Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Multiple Tire Blowouts
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 > Multiple Tire Blowouts

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theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 08/24/19 02:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ItsMeCarlos wrote:

So if by the manufactures numbers, GVWR 9699 lbs. plus Cargo 2731 lbs. totaling 12.430 lbs. can be safely towed.

treyster wrote:

I think your GVWR minus your carrying capacity is your dry weight.

Treyster is correct. GROSS Vehicle Weight Weight Rating (GVWR) includes the cargo. In theory, your trailer weighs 6968 lbs. The only way you will know for sure is to take your empty trailer to a certified scale and have it weighed. (I will bet it weighs over 7000 lbs. !)

ItsMeCarlos wrote:

... the tires that came with the trailer and the tires that are recommended from factory are Load Range D tires. Load range D tires have a max load 2540 lbs. per tire. My trailer is a dual axle (4 tires), so the total of the max weight for the tires should be 10,160 lbs. This is almost the weight of the TT without anything in it!!!

Yes, the TT manufacturer was cutting a corner, even if the GVWR is 9699 lbs.

In the past, umber of plies and letter load ranges were not always consistent. This is why the DOT requires all tires to have the actual load rating IN POUNDS embossed on the side of the tire.

Also, you CAN use LT (light truck) tires in addition to ST (specialty tires) on a trailer. Just make sure the load rating is adequate (I would about 20%-30% OVER the GVWR of my trailer).

campigloo

Baton Rouge, La

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Posted: 08/24/19 02:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’m on my third set of Carlisle radial trails. They’re 10 ply, wear evenly and run cool at around 65. I’m not sure about truck tires on a TT, some say the side wall on the truck tire is not stiff enough for the squirming that trailers inflict. Just don’t know but you might want to keep it in mind. Had you run over something while towing? Maybe a curb or a really nasty pothole? That damage can hide for a while. If your trailer sits for months at a time that can also cause problems. Keep them inflated to 80.
Good luck!

KM Rolling

Byhalia Mississippi

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Posted: 08/24/19 03:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As others have noted, your total weight, including everything you're carrying (which includes water-fresh, gray & black) should not exceed your GVWR, which is a tad under 10,000 lbs.

Many things, as already noted, can contribute to a tire failure.

Being overloaded is easier than you think. Go across a CAT Scale to find out.

Another big thing is speed. Find out the speed rating of your tires. Some trailer tires are rated above 65 (75), but most are 65. I see folks regularly running faster than their tires are rated for.

Low psi, but you have your TPMS, so that should not be an issue.

Sounds like none of your E tires have failed, so you may have found the solution.

Edited to add: Meant to include. On my previous trailer I ran OEM, Made in China, Castle Rock tires. Kept them at Max recommended PSI, trailer was always loaded within 200 lbs of the max GVWR, never exceeded the speed rating of 75 mph, and ran them for a bit over 20,000 miles without a single issue. Still had good tread when I sold the trailer earlier this summer.

I was concerned with everyone talking negative about "China Bombs", but my experience was not bad. The majority of my travel was in mid 80 to mid 90 degrees, and some in 100+ degrees. Additionally we traveled some really bad roads with a lot of very bad potholes. I was very impressed with how they held up.

On our new trailer we have the same China Brand tires. Less than 2,000 miles on them. We'll see how they hold up.

* This post was last edited 08/24/19 04:59pm by KM Rolling *   View edit history


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jjj

Lancaster,Ca.U.S.A.

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Posted: 08/24/19 03:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As others have stated use a good quality American or other trusted tire. I just recently had problems with Michelin ms2 truck tires on my fiver with sidewall cracking at 6 years. I had a none brand tire named Tacoma usa tires that went 8 years no problems and no cracks. I had 10 year old Yokohomas on my truck with no cracks or problems. I now have a bad taste in my mouth about Michelin and will never use them again. I am going to try the Goodyear endurance or the Saliun tires next. My brother has been using the Goodyear endurance for a year now with no problems. Just use a good quality and trusted tire brand.


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marcsbigfoot20b27

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Posted: 08/24/19 04:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What was the max pressure stamp on the side of the original D tires?
What PSI did you run those tires at?

I only ask because I saw a thread somewhere a guy was running 35 lbs in his D tires because the sticker said so.

Buckeyeclan

NE Ohio

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Posted: 08/24/19 07:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Any hard turns manuvering in or out of storage? Tight turn are very hard on the tires on a twin axle

theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 08/24/19 09:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

campigloo wrote:

I’m on my third set of Carlisle radial trails.

Carlisle ! NEVER AGAIN !

Admittedly these were not radial, but both tires on a new boat trailer failed (total thread separation) within less than 2 years.

I replaced them with Nankook (NOT Hankook) bias tires. Used them for over 8 years. Not made in the US or China, but they were fine.

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 08/24/19 09:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Carlisle makes six different trailer tires.
I would only use the Radial Trail HD with a speed rating at 75+

https://www.carlislebrandtires.com/our-products/product-detail/radial-trail-hd


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twodownzero

NM

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Posted: 08/24/19 11:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What you are experiencing is exactly why I tell people on here do not buy tires made in China. They have no meaningful quality control and are garbage. I bet if you buy some Goodyear Endurance tires and keep them aired up you will not have any more problems.

dtappy3353

Oregon

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Posted: 08/25/19 11:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Carlos...what was the TPMS you eventually installed? I am interested in purchasing one. Thank you.

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