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Open Roads Forum  >  Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping

 > where can I do this (purchase a lot and put an rv on it)?

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solismaris

Massachusetts

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Posted: 09/04/19 05:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What's to stop me from just buying a nice lot somewhere and putting my trailer on it, using it maybe 10-20 weeks out of the year for camping?

Presumably, zoning laws.

But seriously, is this possible any place in the northeast us? (MA, ME, NH, VT)?


David Kojen

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Posted: 09/04/19 06:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't know about the NE but in Florida you have to have 5 acres of land to do that. Plus you need power, a well (can be a big deal in the rocky NE I understand) and a septic tank if they are allowed. Not chump change by the time you are ready to move in.


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Merrykalia

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Posted: 09/04/19 06:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are many places in/around Eastern Kentucky, Southern West Virginia, Southwest Virginia and Northeast Tennessee that has little/no zoning, but you will still have to conform to the Dept of Health requirements for water and sewer. It can still be done.


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DutchmenSport

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Posted: 09/04/19 06:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Or do like we did... we purchased a house so we could park the camper on the property and use the camper full time if we wanted. We made sure what the zoning rules were before we purchased the house. The house has water, sewer, electricity. We park the camper in the driveway or behind the house, and basically use the house to do laundry, and when propane usage reaches 1 - thirty pound tank every two days in the winter for heat, then we move back into the house. We have a fire pit and a way to dump the tanks in the trailer. I installed two - thirty amp RV receptacle and one 50 amp receptacle so the camper can be moved to different locations on the property.

If we could not do this, we'd be looking for a new property.

It's an alternative. Maybe you could find an existing property that has an RV port, like a car port, but for RV's, or an existing farm lot with a barn that already has power running to it.

Works for us. But we do keep the camper completely mobile too. In 30 minutes we could be buttoned up, hitched, and out the driveway at any time. We do camp away from home almost every week-end. So these tires never have time to grow moss.

DrewE

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Posted: 09/04/19 08:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In Vermont (and I think New England generally), zoning regulations are determined on a town by town basis. I think there are some areas where that would not be prohibited, particularly on sufficiently large lots.

Septic may be the biggest hurdle from a legal point of view if it's required. At least in Vermont, it's very easy for a septic system design and approval to be five figures--and that's before any parts are bought or dirt is moved. Electric service is, of course, also not inexpensive to install, particularly if fairly distant from the power lines.

DuchmenSport's approach may be more practical. The obvious downside is that you have a whole extra house to maintain.





lane hog

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Posted: 09/05/19 02:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It's not a permanent residence, so trying to apply building codes might not be the right approach, folks...

Look for unincorporated land where there isn't a HOA or other county/town rule which says you can't park/store a vehicle long term.

As long as you're not dumping black tank waste on the ground, I don't see why your holding tanks wouldn't suffice. Solar panels on the roof go a long way towards not needing electricity, and you can always bring water to fill your fresh tank.



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wanderingaimlessly

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Posted: 09/05/19 04:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One way I have seen people get around this is to buy a location with an old mobile home on it, well and septic are in and they just tap in, another is if you can find somewhere that a house has recently burned out or down. Again well and septic are in, and if they had a separate garage that had power to it, even better.

CFerguson

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Posted: 09/06/19 09:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Answered your own question: Zoning.
That said, and as noted already, there are LOTS of places in the USA that still 'allow' you that freedom.
Your research starts.................Now.

Roy&Lynne

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Posted: 09/06/19 11:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

solismaris wrote:

What's to stop me from just buying a nice lot somewhere and putting my trailer on it, using it maybe 10-20 weeks out of the year for camping?

Presumably, zoning laws.

But seriously, is this possible any place in the northeast us? (MA, ME, NH, VT)?

Before you invest, make sure you check state, county and city zoning laws. We had a gentleman invest in some land here in Washington and then found out it wasn't allowed.


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Roy&Lynne

Pacific Northwest

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Posted: 09/06/19 12:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

solismaris wrote:

What's to stop me from just buying a nice lot somewhere and putting my trailer on it, using it maybe 10-20 weeks out of the year for camping?

Presumably, zoning laws.

But seriously, is this possible any place in the northeast us? (MA, ME, NH, VT)?

Before you invest, make sure you check state, county and city zoning laws. We had a gentleman invest in some land here in Washington and then found out it wasn't allowed.

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