Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: When do you throw in the towel?
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 > When do you throw in the towel?

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gmckenzie

BC

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Posted: 09/06/19 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GW Rider wrote:

When I have to pay for the same major repair a second time, time is up.


Had a 2001 GMC Duramax.

First time the injectors went, I did it myself. Major PITA and ~$2,500 CDN, but would have been $6K for a shop to do.

When I started to see a puff of white smoke again, it was off to the dealer to trade it in. Was not doing THAT job again.

The rust would scare me as much as the mechanical issues.


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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/06/19 08:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Age and miles are low and the 8.1 is a monster but hit and miss for reliability.
13-14 midwest winters is alot for most any daily driven vehicle to hold up. Even with the super low miles, presume it was the snow-mobile and not just a summer towing rig. There's more things to rust out, you've just started with that stuff, although some would be replaced soon based on time and miles anyway.
If the body looks good still, it's the perfect time to sell it. That rig is in demand and they fetch a decent amount of money, until the body is rusted out and then it's a beater with a heater.

I'd ditch it now, especially because it will cost you several times more $ to keep on the road than someone who does their own work.
(Based on your post, you pay retail rate for repairs.)


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

solismaris

Massachusetts

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Posted: 09/06/19 11:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

At $60000 for a new truck I'll keep mine going as long as possible. $5000 already this year for fuel lines, brake lines, and new brakes. That's a lot but still well under the cost of new truck payments.

I agree with the person who advised "When annual repair cost reaches 70% of new car payments, that's when it's time." Which is about what I would do if I was comfortable with new truck prices. But for me, when my truck and trailer wear out beyond repair I plan to majorly downsize.

I don't subscribe to the "When repair costs exceed replacement cost it's time" theory. The used vehicle I own and know inside and out is always better than the new-to-me used vehicle I don't know.


David Kojen

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/07/19 10:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^How long do you average annual reaper costs before making that determination?
Trying to put a hard fast quantifiable number to this is like trying to pick the winning lottery numbers.
For those that aren't mechanically inclined and pay retail rates for even basic repairs, nevermind larger repairs, that "time" is much sooner than the guy who can do a complete brake job in his driveway on a sat afternoon for $300 and a 6 pack.

The OP is not fighting age as much as he's fighting the Wisconsin DOT, lol!
I remember replacing brake lines, fuel lines, all sorts of stuff that get ate up by road salt prematurely. It's a never ending battle once it starts. Sure you can limp anything along, but put the price tag on luxury, power, reliability and other even more subjective stuff and the waters get pretty muddy.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/07/19 11:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a year where i dumped new injectors, new clutch, new rear driveshaft, new hydro boost pump and a couple other small things into the old Mega cab.
Some things I spent more $ on for better parts that would last longer or make the truck better, and if I had it all done at the dealer, it would have been, idk, probably $10k or more. As it was, I put probably $4k worth of parts in it.
Shoulda traded it in? I'll say no, since that was 5 years ago and since then I've put about $600 into repair parts, which could have been about $40, but the avg life span of the components surrounding the failed one was about up, so buy once cry once.

Point is, it's subjective. The uninformed would have said this truck is junk, dealer charged me $10k this year alone. I can buy a new truck for $9600 a year in payments.

Btw none of this was/is rust related. That adds another level of uncertainty.

FishOnOne

The Great State of Texas

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Posted: 09/07/19 04:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sometimes it's a crapshoot... We always buy used diesels for farm/ranch work and sometimes they can go on for years with very little repairs and sometimes it's one thing after another. We buy these trucks knowing that there will be repairs along the way but the key is we buy diesel trucks that don't have EGR's and DPF's. Having said that we had one truck that everyone hated to drive because of the manual transmission we cut our losses after the transfer case took a dump so off she went after a list of repairs. Early this year we had another truck purple aftermarket transmission took a dump and the dealer didn't want to take it for the core. It's currently on the short list to be sent on it's way.


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Vintage465

Prunedale CA.

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Posted: 09/08/19 08:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had somewhat the same issue with a '99 suburban used for everyday driving and towing. Put an engine in at 205,000 miles. Transmission @ 319,000 miles. Replaced heater cores, power window switches, compressor etc over the years. Started a "growl" somewhere in the drive line I couldn't locate. It was a great car and tow vehicle, but we got to a point that my bride and I weren't comfy with taking it any real distance. At 400,000 miles, I gave it to a needy family that needed a daily driver. Saw it the other day! Still running! Bought the Denali and been happy since. Since we are going to do "real travel" when I retire, I will likely use the same type "maintain it like crazy and sell it when I lose control of the repairs" montra


V-465
2013 GMC 2500HD Denali. 2015 Creekside 20fq w/450 watts solar. Retiring in 2021, then look-out road, here we come!

garyp4951

TN

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Posted: 09/08/19 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You just spent a years worth of payments fixing it, sell it before something else breaks down.
You don't want to put your family in a dangerous situation breaking down on the road.

krobbe

West Michigan

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Posted: 09/08/19 12:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For me in Michigan, the amount of rust usually determines when I offload a vehicle and look for another rust free one. The southwest states should have something in the used market to tow with.
My '03 3/4 Burb with 140K miles is from TX and has no rust. It still has never seen salt and I'm fortunate to only occasionally drive it in warmer months. I would cry if anything should happen to it.
The insurance and registration on a new vehicle is also a consideration at least in my state.


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minnow

Upstate South Carolina

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Posted: 09/08/19 02:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If the old vehicle left me stranded while towing a trailer, it would be gone before sun down. I can stomach fixing things when I'm home and on my terms. It's a whole 'nother story when you are sitting along side some interstate with big rigs whizzing by you at 75 mph and 3" off your mirrors.

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