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 > Replacing a Travel Trailer floor

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mgirardo

Brunswick, GA

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Joined: 05/04/2007

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Posted: 10/06/19 08:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mrstan64 wrote:

I am looking for a local to MA or NH to replace my 21 ft TT floor due to it becoming spongy.I have attempted to do this on a local area of the trailer, but I found many other soft spots throughout. Does anyone have any recommendations?

Mark


I don't know anyone in your area, but as others have said, it will be costly.

Our Hybrid TT had a soft floor from a leak at one of the outside storage doors. Factory didn't seal the bottom (have seen that on lots of TTs and MHs) and water came in. It started under the dinette, so we didn't notice it until the rot came out beyond the dinette.

I ended up replacing about 40% of the floor. Ours was an ultralight and after making the fix, the floor was not as stiff as new. I ended up putting in a few 2x4s to act as I Beams between the main trailer supports. It helped, but still not as stiff as new.

The process was a long one. I had a friend help me pull the furniture up (sofa, dinette and the front storage cabinet). We also had to remove the pump, fresh water tank and the hot water heater. We just the vinyl floor and pulled it back as far as we could, which was to the refrigerator. There was a small amount of rot under the refrigerator, but it wasn't bad enough to warrant removing the pantry and refrigerator cabinet.

After we removed the rotten wood, I let the trailer sit for a week in the backyard with the bed ends out and the door open in the middle of the summer in GA (no rain all week) to dry out. Then I replaced most of the insulation (foam board) and I used 1/4" oak plywood instead of luan. Glued the floor back down and replaced everything we removed.

-Michael


Michael Girardo
2017 Jayco Jayflight Bungalow 40BHQS Destination Trailer
2009 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS Class C Motorhome (previously owned)
2006 Rockwood Roo 233 Hybrid Travel Trailer (previously owned)
1995 Jayco Eagle 12KB pop-up (previously owned)

Gdetrailer

PA

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Joined: 01/05/2007

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Posted: 10/06/19 02:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mrstan64 wrote:

Yes it is a sandwich of luan. the Luan was completely rotted on the upper layer and the foam was a bit moldy.

I wont be paying 5 grand for a 21 foot trailer floor, but I would be ok with 2 grand.


OK, to put this into perspective..

Not including materials or taxes this is what $2K gets you..

$25 per hr, gives you 80 hrs of labor

$50 per hr, gives you 40 hrs of labor

$100 per hr, gives you 20 hrs of labor.

$150 per hr, gives you 13.3 hrs of labor.

Now, take into consideration the amount of work YOU did to fix ONE spot you should easily be able to see the problem here..

Additionally, keep in mind the person you hire, just may not be all that caring about how it is fixed or what they may damage or break in the process of repairing the floor.

Even worse is the fact you ARE also looking for help in New England states, an insanely costly place to live with insanely high cost of goods and services.. Had a Brother that lived in VT, paid 4 times more for stuff than states south of New York, you would swear that VT was some remote island..

Unless you are firmly attached to this trailer you might really wish to consider replacing it if you are not wanting to finish fixing it..

I have fully rebuilt two different TTs, it is a labor of love, not planning to EVER rebuild another, it is a lot of labor. Took me 9 months on my current TT to completely gut inside and out, replace all of the rotted wood (rot just kept going) then build all new cabinets, resided it and reroofed it on top. Yeah, I did buy it knowing it was rotted and yes, I intended to gut it.

You may not be intending to gut, but, until you start ripping things apart there is no way to know for sure..

BobsYourUncle

Calgary Alberta Canada

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Posted: 10/06/19 07:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Putting things into perspective, with the aforementioned TT rebuild I did, all the work I described in my previous post, I didn't mention that I actually rebuilt nearly 100% of the entire thing, only exception being a few floor joists that somehow escaped the rot. Roof, walls, floor, furniture and partitions etc, all completely rebuilt with new wood.

I figured, the stuff is out anyways, cannot match the paneling of the original. most of it is rotten on the bottom anyways, may as well rebuild all of the furniture, partitions etc while I have it apart.

Labor wise, I roughly figure I had about 1000 hours of my own time into it. Yes I took my time, but like my father taught me, If a job is worth doing, its worth doing right.

I also spent, I forget exactly, but somewhere around 4G in materials too. Maybe more, I never had the guts to total it all up. I'd be depressed if I did that!

No, it is never worth rebuilding an RV of any kind. You will get upside down in a heck of a hurry.

After I was too far into it to quit, I still had a 1981 Citation 25 foot TT, and it was far from complete when I sold it for parts for $1750.

Unless you are madly in love with this thing, and want to be buried in it one day, I can tell you from personal experience that it isn't worth it.

I could have spent those 1000 hours camping instead.


2007 GMC 3500 dually ext. cab 4X4 LBZ
Dmax/Allison

1997 Triple E Topaz 27' Bunkhouse TT

I do
Precision Guesswork
based on
Vague Assumptions
&
Unreliable Data of Dubious Accuracy
provided by persons of
Questionable Intellectual Capacity

Now, What would you like done?


CavemanCharlie

Storden,MN

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Posted: 10/08/19 06:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't know if this would work for you. But,,, I once just used 1/2 inch plywood to, Cover, and not replace a bad floor.

By doing this I was able to just go around cabinets and things like that and not replace the floor under them (where it was in good shape anyway).

I found that the little half round aluminum piece on the inside of the entry door was exactly 1/2 inch thick so I did not have to move the entry door. After covering the floor with new plywood the bottom of the door was now flush with the floor instead of the little kick up that it used to have. (I did not explain that very well but if you look at the inside of your entry door at the bottom I think you will see what I'm talking about. )

The rest of the drawers and cabinets doors were high enough to clear the new floor. The only thing I had to do was remove, and cut, a little off of the bathroom door to give it extra clearance.

I then went to the home center and bought some of those square glue on vinyl plank flooring and covered up all the plywood with them. It looked nice when I was done.

Worked fine for me and no one ever knew. But, I'm a caveman.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Joined: 04/08/2002

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Posted: 10/09/19 03:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CavemanCharlie wrote:

I don't know if this would work for you. But,,, I once just used 1/2 inch plywood to, Cover, and not replace a bad floor.

By doing this I was able to just go around cabinets and things like that and not replace the floor under them (where it was in good shape anyway).

I found that the little half round aluminum piece on the inside of the entry door was exactly 1/2 inch thick so I did not have to move the entry door. After covering the floor with new plywood the bottom of the door was now flush with the floor instead of the little kick up that it used to have. (I did not explain that very well but if you look at the inside of your entry door at the bottom I think you will see what I'm talking about. )

The rest of the drawers and cabinets doors were high enough to clear the new floor. The only thing I had to do was remove, and cut, a little off of the bathroom door to give it extra clearance.

I then went to the home center and bought some of those square glue on vinyl plank flooring and covered up all the plywood with them. It looked nice when I was done.

Worked fine for me and no one ever knew. But, I'm a caveman.
This could work. It will add more weight, but if you have enough CC, it would be OK... The risk is in not knowing just how bad the rot is. If it gets to the point where the structure is weakened,,,,It would be a waste of time. One can inspect all you want to try to determine this.... A total demolition is the only sure way to know. But with the right TT, and some luck, it could work


Huntindog
100% boondocking
2010 Palomino Sabre 30 BHDS
84 gal. Grey. 84 gal. Black
2 bathrooms, no waiting
2011 Silverado CC DA big dually.



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