Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Winter RV'ing in Northern NWT/Yukon
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 > Winter RV'ing in Northern NWT/Yukon

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westernrvparkowner

montana

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Posted: 10/25/19 02:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Peter-hs,

https://www.yukoninfo.com/listing/eagle-plains-hotel-service-station/

66.504070, -136.688115

Inuvik, Northwest Territories 68.560742, -133.383327

https://www.inuvik.ca/en/index.asp

and

https://www.inuvik.ca/en/discovering-inu........urces/FLAT-SHEET_CAMPS-AND-PARKS-web.pdf

Unless you are an extremely seasoned winter camper, I would not go away from other human habitation. You really don't wish to end up as Robert Falcon Scott did.

What you are attempting is dangerous and any mistakes won't be forgiven. You will need a way to call for help. A satellite phone would be a requirement. Even if you call, assistance may be days away from you. Helicopters and planes do have cold weather "no fly" temperatures.

Likely you will be required to file a proposal (permission may be denied) and may have to buy "rescue" insurance.

I've boondocked at -37 C, and been storm stayed by a four day blizzard where the daily high was -27, but I was in a town. That allowed me to replenish fuel supplies. I burned 50 pounds of propane in 48 hours. I ran a Kipor 2800 electric start generator for about 6 hours per day and burned 44 liters of fuel in 4 days.

Winter diesel gels at -40 C, and the boiling point for propane is -42 C. That means using some kind of tank heater in truly cold weather. I have a "magnetic mount" block heater that I can use on the propane tank. It can be used on the bottom of my generator as well.

My RV has been highly modified for cold weather use. I can heat 100% electrically--but the peak load is 7700 watts (about 26274 BTU's). That is more than the output from my propane furnace.

A wind mill that would produce significant power and be reliable may cost more than your RV. Steel doesn't behave the same way in extreme cold. There are documented reports of hammers shattering. Two commercial wind turbines in Rankin Inlet lasted less than two years.

Your diet will need to be calorie rich, so forget about eating sparingly. You will need LOTS of water. Tonight, where I am, it is currently -4 C. Relative humidity in the RV is only 30%. I've measured as low as 5% RH inside my unit.

If you still want to do this, plan on triple redundancy for ALL the necessary systems. I've been camping and boondocking in extreme cold since 2000. I'd not attempt what you seem to want to do.
If Don, who is about as close to crazy in his ability to stay in a winter environment, wouldn't do what the OP is planning, I would say the most important thing the OP can add to his plan is to have an updated will.
Montana is by no means the Northwest Territories or upper Yukon Territory and I can attest that even a Montana winter will tax every system. Plastic will crumble, metal will shatter, and everything will need constant maintenance to even marginally function. An even bigger concern the effect extreme cold has on your mental faculties. Every year people die due to exposure even though safety was within their reach. What sounds possible while sitting in a 72F living room isn't what you are going to find when you actually face reality.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 10/25/19 04:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Western,

Thanks for the compliment.

I think it could be done--but it surely won't be fun. It would be safer and easier if there were two persons. Folks do get ill, but the weather doesn't care about that. If there is no power and no heat things may go sideways rather rapidly.

The longer the planned expedition, the harder the task will be. What I have done is a cake walk by comparison. Doing what the OP wants to do is NOT on my bucket list.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

cewillis

Tucson, az, usa

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Posted: 10/27/19 01:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator


Yeah, Eagle Plains, 'great spot', they claim to have 30a hooks ups.
Are you going that far north?


Cal


cewillis

Tucson, az, usa

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Posted: 10/30/19 05:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wait a minute -- is this some sort of purification ritual?

sue.t

Ibex Valley, YUKON

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Posted: 11/02/19 09:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While living on Vancouver Island, we made two December trips into Yukon to visit my Dad for Christmas.
December 1998 http://yukonsights.ca/19981212_AlaskaHwy.html
December 2001 http://yukonsights.ca/20011215_AlaskaHwy.html
In 2001 we experienced -40 temperature.
Now we live in Yukon so am very familiar with winter conditions, no where near as cold as when I grew up here though. When I was a kid I remember -65F
Don't expect any campgrounds to be open, but some businesses might let you plug in because vehicles overnighting in very cold weather need to plug in their block heaters. We usually used the opportunity to plug in the RV's engine block heater so it would be able to start in the morning. It is useful to have a generator if needed.
Filling with propane can be an problem when it is very cold and propane may liquefy if it is very cold. Read the solution in my December 1998 story.
If you're going north of the Arctic Circle, there is no sunrise on the shortest day of the year.
Also be prepared for blizzards, it is common for the Dempster Highway to close in the winter due to wind and snow.
You might also see Northern Lights
[image]


sue t.
Pictures from our many RV Adventures to Yukon & Alaska from Vancouver Island. Now we live in Yukon!

sue.t

Ibex Valley, YUKON

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Posted: 11/02/19 09:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

peter-hs wrote:


MDKMDK - Thank you for this suggestion. So far, I've looked at the tourism sites for both provinces to see if any of the parks/RV sites are open during the winter and provide hookups. Unfortunately, the information on the sites indicates all parks are closed during this period. But, I'll take your suggestion and contact the tourism offices for both provinces to get information, such as feasibility, from them directly.

Yukon is not a province - officially it is a territory.
And NWT is Northwest Territories - also not a province.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 11/03/19 01:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

sue t,

Thanks for sharing those links. Fascinating!

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 11/04/19 11:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Back to the OPs thoughts, in short, while this is doable, even with a source of plug in electricity, it’s more like a winter survival experience than a “trip.”
Having spent time in some camps that were temporary rig camps, Basically well insulated adco trailers, they take a huge amount of power and/or fuel to live comfortably in.
And in the winter, I can tell you we were only outside because we had to be (work). You don’t recreate outside up there in the winter. Period. Unless you’re an Eskimo or have mental issues.
And have at least 2 backup plans for heat, for whatever residence option you choose.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

free radical

Canada

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Posted: 11/10/19 07:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Anything posible IF one knows how,but then these people are used to such temps.

Going to school in coldest place on earth

https://youtu.be/5HXXJg4vDF8

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