Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Yes boys and girls, you REALLY need to carry a spare...
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 > Yes boys and girls, you REALLY need to carry a spare...

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Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 10/27/19 01:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LOG wrote:



Running the fronts on most 25' or less Class C's at 80 psi per the door stickers {which are a bad joke}, will reduce the contact patch to the point that it will handle like a pig on skates and be blown all over the road by passing trucks and/or cross winds. Putting 80 in the rears would be serious overkill las at 80 they are rated for 2,640# of load X 4 = 10,560# to carry a 7,700# load. This also creates a very stiff ride that will beat you to death and shorten tire life.

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Most Michelin tires for a 25' or less Class C would have a load rating of 2,470# in a dual wheel configuration. Please provide the tire size.



I stand corrected, with duallies the max load is less {not sure why} but even if it is only 2470 X 4 = 9880 to support a load of 7,700 { the ten percent fudge factor - 7,700 x 1.1 = 8470}. All four of my duallies are always aired to the same psi which is based upon the actual load they are carrying and typically varies from 65 when not towing or loaded heavy to 75 when towing and loaded heavy. Since the load on the front axle varies less I typically run them at 60 - 65.

My tires are all 225 75 16's and the last three I just brought are the new Michelin Agilis Cross Climate which were the successors to the LTX MS 2's and Defender series and have a max psi of 90.

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pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/27/19 03:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our 24 foot E450 Class C handles great using the door pressures of ~80# rear, and ~65# front ... in the taller Defender 215/85/16E tires I retrofitted on it (six, plus the spare) a few years ago.

HOWEVER ... in the rear I had to remove shock stiffness from the situation on sharp bumps - and add shock stiffness to the situation on gentle bumps and curves - by using frequency selective damping shocks in the rear. This has worked like a champ so as to allow a gentle ride while at the same time using ~80# of pressure back there.

I want a worry-free Class C simultaneous with minimum messing around adjusting parameters, so high tire pressure in the rear allows us to load up the RV with no weight concerns before trips, or when on trips. Our rig now handles identical alone or when towing our boat - regardless of how much we've piled in it or on it. I call it having "chassis overkill" in what's underneath the coach.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 10/27/19 05:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A couple of thoughts to share...

Look at the second pic and note how far over the rig is leaning to the passenger side. About 15 minutes after parking there in my best attempt to get as far from the right lane as possible it dawned on me... Duh! the frig is on and running on gas.

I quickly shut it down but was wishing I had thought about this about 14 minutes earlier and began to wonder if I had compromised my refrigeration. Fortunately no damage was done as the it continued to work throughout the trip. Just add checking your frig when parked at less than level to your checklist {yep Methinks I dodged a bullet here}.

I had lost track over the last 6 years as to the DOT codes on all of my tires and yes they all looked good, no cracking or checking but time is not your friend. I should have known better and from now on will keep a log for each tire.

Get a set of the emergency triangles... they work very well. Next time you drive down the interstate and see a truck broken down with the triangles deployed take note of how they quickly they catch your eye. At night they light up in headlights for even better visibility. They are far safer and less trouble than lighting conventional road flares.

While I carry a large heavy duty "X" style lug wrench I am retiring it in favor of an air wrench {probably from Harbor Freight} as that is what the tire guy had. They are easy to keep charged and use . Given that most lug nuts on a Class C are torqued to 150# {with Class A's even higher} breaking them loose without the mechanical advantage of a power wrench makes this upgrade a no brainer.

I did not need my compressor but I carry two {1 DC and 1 AC}. If ERS is not available you might just need that option. While waiting for ERS getting well away from the traffic is critical. Things like chairs and sunscreen not to mention proper hydration {snacks etc.} are essential. Bottom line we weren't, but you might be there for hours... just read through the nightmare complaints about bad road service found in this and other RV Forums.

Hope my experience helps someone avoid a problem, or a bigger problem. Be safe out there, plan for the worst and hope for the best.

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DrewE

Vermont

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Posted: 10/27/19 07:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rather than an impact wrench (which I think is what you mean by air wrench--it sounds as though you're talking about rechargeable electric ones, not pneumatic ones that require a halfway decent compressor to use), you may want to consider a breaker bar. 140 foot-pounds of torque using a two foot breaker bar is seventy pounds of force, well within what most people can exert without undue strain (if only by stepping on the end of the breaker bar). The impact wrenches do work pretty well, though, and are definitely quicker if you're going to be changing out wheels frequently.





ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 10/27/19 07:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DrewE wrote:

...you may want to consider a breaker bar. 140 foot-pounds of torque using a two foot breaker bar is seventy pounds of force, well within what most people can exert without undue strain (if only by stepping on the end of the breaker bar).
I carry a 32" long 3/4" breaker bar and a 12" x 3/4" extension to reach into the deep well of the rear wheels. I also have a 3/4" proper-size socket for our E350. It is surely over-kill but gives me peace of mind. Our rig being stored indoors won't have rusted-on lug nuts, but the extra long bar might be handy helping someone else with a badly weathered motor home, made worse yet if equipped with alloy wheels.

The extra long breaker bar stores perfectly inside our front dinette bench.

* This post was edited 10/28/19 10:58am by ron.dittmer *


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Jack Spratt

Maine

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Posted: 10/28/19 04:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bauer electric impact from Harbor Freight $90 about 1100 ft/pounds.
Works great if you have a generator.
It is hefty but that is why there is so little torque passed through the handle


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jjrbus

FT Myers FL

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Posted: 10/28/19 04:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I also carry a large 3/4" breaker bar, my lug nuts are torqued to 170 ft lbs so takes a bit to get them loose. I read that the table support leg can be used as an extension on the bar, but have never thought to try it.

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 10/28/19 09:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jack Spratt wrote:

Bauer electric impact from Harbor Freight $90 about 1100 ft/pounds.
Works great if you have a generator.
It is hefty but that is why there is so little torque passed through the handle
I have a Craftsman electric gun and it works great at home. The torque wrench serves me fine on the road. Just can't take every tool or I would need an additional trailer.


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Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 10/31/19 09:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Many people I know don't carry a spare with 19.5 or 22.5 in tires because they are too heavy to change and some would argue too dangerous to change on the side of the highway. I carry a spare with a 3/4 in breaker bar with a steel tube that will extend to 3 ft with 6 point sockets to break the lug nuts. The 19.5 in tire has gotten heavier since I bought the MH 15 years ago but I can still change it. In 100k miles of travel thankfully I have never had to change a blown tire on the hiway. I picked up a large screw crossing the Canadian border but used a tire plug kit to fix it without removing the tire. I hit a large pot hole in a paved road in Alaska and bent the steel rim on both the MH and the tow car. I was able to straighten both rims with a large hammer without leaking any air and moved the bent rim to spare when I got home.

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 10/31/19 10:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We've owned various MH's in the past 10 years and I have never carried a spare. Kudos to the guys that carry them but I'd rather have the storage space for something else, not have to buy an extra tire that I may never use and age out at the same rate of the one's on the ground, and hope that I can actually lift and mount it, and my credit card for Coachnet takes up much less room and effort. To each his own.

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