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 > Yes boys and girls, you REALLY need to carry a spare...

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Elk_traveler

maryland

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Posted: 11/17/19 05:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lwiddis wrote:

I never go without a spare for the TV and TT.


Agree 100%. I would never leave the house without a spare. Been RVing for several decades and had a flat on an earlier unit without a spare. The charge to replace it on the road by the emergency guy was 3X what it should have been. No choice had to pay it. If you have no spare and a tire needs replacing you are a sitting duck for a rip-off. There may be a few honest people left but in a situation on the road it is too easy to just over charge you and you basically have no choice but to pay up.

klutchdust

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Posted: 11/19/19 09:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This post is almost carbon copy of what I recently experienced. Now I would add that you should check or have checked,

the mounting of your spare tire. On mine, the turnbuckle was rusted and we had to unmount the spare tire carrier to be

able to drop the tire. I was pulling my side by side on a 12 foot trailer so we threw the damaged tire on there. Once home I

updated the mounting hardware and lubed all necessary parts.

The spare tire carrier got whacked a few times by who knows what and was slightly bent as well.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 11/19/19 10:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

klutchdust wrote:

This post is almost carbon copy of what I recently experienced. Now I would add that you should check or have checked,

the mounting of your spare tire. On mine, the turnbuckle was rusted and we had to unmount the spare tire carrier to be

able to drop the tire. I was pulling my side by side on a 12 foot trailer so we threw the damaged tire on there. Once home I

updated the mounting hardware and lubed all necessary parts.

The spare tire carrier got whacked a few times by who knows what and was slightly bent as well.


Just as a reminder regarding the obvious: For those of you who do carry a spare for your RV, make sure you check and maintain proper pressure in it!


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

Dusty R

Charlotte Michigan 48813

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Posted: 11/19/19 10:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Or carry a small air compressor.

Desert Captain

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Posted: 11/19/19 12:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP here:

Just got off of the phone with my GEICO claims adjuster...

Freedom RV where the repairs are being done, had him come out and they showed him the extensive additional damage that I was afraid my be lurking just beneath the surface.

When that tire "grenaded" the force must have been huge as in addition to the obvious damage {bent/twisted frame member} the wheel well needs to be replaced - it was forced up and into the interior flooring by the blast. They found damaged cabinetry inside the coach and are currently checking all of the drainage and electrical systems in that area for any possible additional hidden damage.

Bottom line, their estimate is now sitting at $4,131. It will probably be another week before everything that they have found is repaired {assuming they find no additional problems}. My $500 deductible doesn't sound too bad to me at this point.

As to a couple of recent comments above...

Yep, you not only need to carry a spare but be sure you or the ERS guys can access it and that it is properly inflated and ready to go. The custom mount I had Nexus install beneath the rear of the coach worked perfectly.

Prior to every trip I always have the tires inspected and aired up for the load they will be carrying {as it varies by as much as a thousand pounds depending on how we load and what, if anything I am towing}. About every third or fourth trip I ask them to check the spare for proper psi and yes I always tip the guy a few bucks for the extra effort/service.

[emoticon]





4x4van

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Posted: 11/20/19 09:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

Good points Phil...

We all hope to never need help but all too often an injury, even a minor one can spell disaster. I carry a serious first aid kit and have been trained in its use {the same medical kit I carried when doing extended offshore boating trips modified slightly for the RV environment}. From a suture kit to serious pain meds, I am prepared to deal with burns, fractures and bleeding.

Often we are either beyond cell phone coverage or at its outer limits where help can be hours {or more} away. I also have the GS emergency travel assist but admit to some trepidation as to how effective it will ultimately be. Since we often are riding our motorcycle the possibility of even a minor accident could render us less than able to get ourselves and the rig home.


Yep, plan for the worst and hope for the best, once a Boy Scout always a Boy Scout...
Be Prepared!

[emoticon]
This is a good point (albeit a bit off the OP's subject). We camp in the desert, oftentimes a long ways from "help", and we engage in relatively dangerous pastimes (ATVs, motorcycles, PWC, etc.) I have always carried a small first aid kit, but the reality is that those are really of limited use; more for comforting kids than anything serious.

Then, a few years ago, my son's fiance broke her neck way out in the dunes. After a $100,000 helicopter ride, she thankfully has made a full recovery, but it made me realize that I needed something more serious than a few band-aids. I now carry a large trauma kit in the RV that can address things like heavy bleeding, broken bones, neck/spinal injuries, burns, etc. Although I hope to never need most of the items in it, I am comforted a bit knowing that it's there.


We don't stop playing because we grow old...We grow old because we stop playing!

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pnichols

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Posted: 11/20/19 12:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4x4van wrote:

Desert Captain wrote:

Good points Phil...

We all hope to never need help but all too often an injury, even a minor one can spell disaster. I carry a serious first aid kit and have been trained in its use {the same medical kit I carried when doing extended offshore boating trips modified slightly for the RV environment}. From a suture kit to serious pain meds, I am prepared to deal with burns, fractures and bleeding.

Often we are either beyond cell phone coverage or at its outer limits where help can be hours {or more} away. I also have the GS emergency travel assist but admit to some trepidation as to how effective it will ultimately be. Since we often are riding our motorcycle the possibility of even a minor accident could render us less than able to get ourselves and the rig home.


Yep, plan for the worst and hope for the best, once a Boy Scout always a Boy Scout...
Be Prepared!

[emoticon]
This is a good point (albeit a bit off the OP's subject). We camp in the desert, oftentimes a long ways from "help", and we engage in relatively dangerous pastimes (ATVs, motorcycles, PWC, etc.) I have always carried a small first aid kit, but the reality is that those are really of limited use; more for comforting kids than anything serious.

Then, a few years ago, my son's fiance broke her neck way out in the dunes. After a $100,000 helicopter ride, she thankfully has made a full recovery, but it made me realize that I needed something more serious than a few band-aids. I now carry a large trauma kit in the RV that can address things like heavy bleeding, broken bones, neck/spinal injuries, burns, etc. Although I hope to never need most of the items in it, I am comforted a bit knowing that it's there.


I'm curious ... was that $100,000 helicopter ride covered by air medivac insurance?

I guess a takeaway might be: If a remote area RV'er does have the insurance or personal money for air medivac, they probably should have a way of calling for air medivac when cell phones can't get out.

toedtoes

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Posted: 11/20/19 01:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That's why I got a Garmin inReach. And for a few extra dollars per year, it includes emergency insurance for just type of thing.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
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Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 11/20/19 02:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Stopped by Freedom RV to check on the additional damage they uncovered... yikes!

Here is a shot of the hydraulic ram they are using to straighten out part of the damaged frame. the twisted bar in this pic will be cut out and a new one welded in. The new top box for the wheel well is almost ready to install and the cabinets are ready for repair as well.

[image]

They are hoping to get the rest of the parts in and complete the repairs by the end of the month.

Check your DOT codes folks and if they are 5 years old or more replace them regardless of how good they might look. I didn't and this was the result.

[emoticon]

4x4van

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Posted: 11/20/19 03:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

4x4van wrote:

Desert Captain wrote:

Good points Phil...

We all hope to never need help but all too often an injury, even a minor one can spell disaster. I carry a serious first aid kit and have been trained in its use {the same medical kit I carried when doing extended offshore boating trips modified slightly for the RV environment}. From a suture kit to serious pain meds, I am prepared to deal with burns, fractures and bleeding.

Often we are either beyond cell phone coverage or at its outer limits where help can be hours {or more} away. I also have the GS emergency travel assist but admit to some trepidation as to how effective it will ultimately be. Since we often are riding our motorcycle the possibility of even a minor accident could render us less than able to get ourselves and the rig home.


Yep, plan for the worst and hope for the best, once a Boy Scout always a Boy Scout...
Be Prepared!

[emoticon]
This is a good point (albeit a bit off the OP's subject). We camp in the desert, oftentimes a long ways from "help", and we engage in relatively dangerous pastimes (ATVs, motorcycles, PWC, etc.) I have always carried a small first aid kit, but the reality is that those are really of limited use; more for comforting kids than anything serious.

Then, a few years ago, my son's fiance broke her neck way out in the dunes. After a $100,000 helicopter ride, she thankfully has made a full recovery, but it made me realize that I needed something more serious than a few band-aids. I now carry a large trauma kit in the RV that can address things like heavy bleeding, broken bones, neck/spinal injuries, burns, etc. Although I hope to never need most of the items in it, I am comforted a bit knowing that it's there.


I'm curious ... was that $100,000 helicopter ride covered by air medivac insurance?

I guess a takeaway might be: If a remote area RV'er does have the insurance or personal money for air medivac, they probably should have a way of calling for air medivac when cell phones can't get out.
Luckily, her regular health insurance covered it (no different than an ambulance ride; it was deemed necessary due to the injury and the distance to a trauma center). She was brought out of the dunes on a litter on the side of a BLM buggy, then an ambulance to a nearby hospital (Brawley). After x-rays determined the severity, the helicopter ride 100 miles to the trauma center (Palm Springs). Her out-of-pocket cost (helicopter, ambulance, 2 hospitals) was about $3,000 total.

There are policies that can be purchased specifically for Air Evacs, but most normal health insurance will cover it as well if it is deemed necessary.

* This post was edited 11/20/19 04:50pm by 4x4van *

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