Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Changes in Air Temp and Tire PSI
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 > Changes in Air Temp and Tire PSI

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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 10/28/19 01:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"My 80 pis tire went to 125psi just going from 80 degrees to 115 degree climate. This was combo of ambient temps and the heat generated from driving - mostly heat from driving with a lot of weight on the tires."

If this is actually true and not a typo, then you would have 3rd degree burns on your hands from touching the tire and the air inside would be roughly the temperature of a pizza oven.


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time2roll

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Posted: 10/28/19 01:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Going 80F to 115F is fairly common for some of us in coastal CA driving to Vegas. And I will assure the OP no one is adjusting air pressure enroute.


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Beverley&Ken

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Posted: 10/28/19 08:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As you are going to do, check every morning, but I would bleed any off if it were only 5 psi or so. If it gets above 10 over yes. I may affect your handling and ride, (assuming a MH or tow vehicle).
Years ago, we left home (north of Toronto) , the temp was about -20F and pressures set for ambient cold at 80 psi and 65psi in front (c-class). Later in the trip, after getting on the road in the morning, the handling was a nightmare and horribly rough ride, only thoughts were about the pothole I'd hit the day before, not tire pressures. Next day I checked the tire pressure before getting on the road, The fronts were well over 90psi. After reducing the pressure to the appropriate pressures, the ride and handling were back to normal.

Ken


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Gonzo42

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Posted: 10/28/19 08:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree with the previous posts. Just wanted to mention that wear on the tire will indicate if your pressure and your driving is causing uneven wear you should re-asses. If your pressure is low, the wear will be close to the sidewall. If your pressure is too high, the middle of the tire will wear more.


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JimK-NY

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Posted: 10/28/19 09:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ajriding wrote:

......

My 80 pis tire went to 125psi just going from 80 degrees to 115 degree climate. This was combo of ambient temps and the heat generated from driving - mostly heat from driving with a lot of weight on the tires.

It is smart to check psi in this situation, but a warm tire would not need to be deflated back to the cold psi rating (in this case 80), rather something around 100 would be fine. .....


Absolutely, not fine and very dangerous advice. Never, ever deflate a hot tire because the pressure increases due to driving. If it is hot and you are carrying a heavy load at high speed, the solution is to slow down. Even then expect high pressure during highway driving in hot weather.

CapriRacer

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Posted: 10/29/19 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gonzo42 wrote:

As a rule of thumb, air pressure in tires incraase about one psi for a temperature increase of 10 degrees F. …...


Sorry that only applies to passenger car tires - 30 psi or so.

For higher pressure tires use 3% for every 10°F. So for an 80 psi tire, that's 2.4 psi for every 10°F - or from 45°F to 80°F, it's 8.4 psi increase.


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RobWNY

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Posted: 10/29/19 08:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think since there's so much different information being provided that doing as I posted earlier, checking each morning of our trip and adjusting accordingly, would be the best thing to do. I have a TPMS system so I'll know if pressures and/or temperatures get out of the normal range.


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ajriding

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Posted: 10/29/19 10:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:


Absolutely, not fine and very dangerous advice. Never, ever deflate a hot tire because the pressure increases due to driving. If it is hot and you are carrying a heavy load at high speed, the solution is to slow down. Even then expect high pressure during highway driving in hot weather.


Maybe so. I never deflate tires in middle of drive so do not know. The tire should be able to handle being heated up and the increased psi that goes with it.
So, what happens if a tire is deflated a little bit?

pizza-oven guy, 115 deg is hot to walk around in all day, but not going to burn anything. A sauna is usually 180 degrees by comparison. water boils at 212.

JimK-NY

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Posted: 10/29/19 02:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ajriding wrote:


......
So, what happens if a tire is deflated a little bit?

......

Tires flex and build up heat which increases the pressure and decreases the flexing. If you lower the pressure the tire is going to flex excessively which will shorten its life and if severe enough will cause a failure.

philh

Belleville MI

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Posted: 10/29/19 06:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pure nitrogen has ZERO advantage in car/truck/trailer tires.

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