Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Towing: Sway Control options - help please
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 > Sway Control options - help please

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Janie Ryan

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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Posted: 10/31/19 01:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lwiddis wrote:

What is your TT’s wet and loaded weight? What is your TT’s tongue weight wet and loaded?


These are the numbers I can see on the trailer
hitch (dy) 683 lbs
UVW 6933
NCC 1567
GVWR 8500


Dennis & Janie Ryan,
RV - 2014 F150 4x4

opnspaces

San Diego Ca

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Posted: 11/02/19 09:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would add about 1,200 lbs to the UVWR so it would be 8,133 lbs loaded. This gives you a potential tongue weight of 1,200 lbs at 15% of the loaded weight. It looks like the manufacturer is calculating only 10% tongue weight which is the minimum recommended percent of tongue weight.


2001 Suburban 4x4. 6.0L, 4.10 3/4 ton
2005 Jayco Jay Flight 27BH
1986 Coleman Columbia Popup.

ttavasc

Western Washington

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Posted: 11/07/19 10:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm assuming you have an Outdoors RV trailer from the Timber Ridge family line. Which specific model is it? ORV trailers are known to be somewhat tongue heavy which is why we went with a 3/4 ton instead of a 1/2 ton for our recent Timber Ridge upgrade. Our 23DBS is about 900lbs heavier as delivered compared to the published full featured dry weight. Lightly loaded at around 8000lbs the tongue weight is 1180lbs which is close to 15%. We are using a Blue Ox SwayPro 15K hitch with 1500lb bars. Excellent sway control, easy to hitch up and pulls very nicely.

As others have suggested you should get everything weighed so you know exactly what your weights are and what your actual tongue weight/percent is. That will help to make an educated decision about which hitch and sway control to use.


TT: 2019 ORV Timber Ridge 23DBS, Blue Ox SwayPro 15K/1500
TV: 2019 F-250 XLT SuperCab LB, 6.2L, 4.30/e-locker, 164" WB, 4x4
TV - 2014 RAM 1500 Big Horn CC (Traded In)
TT - 2015 Jayco Jay Flight SLX 195RB Baja Edition, Andersen No-Sway hitch (Traded in)


Flapper

Minnesota

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Posted: 11/07/19 11:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So much unknown here...
True sway is where the rear end of the trailer starts wagging back and forth (many times getting stronger with each "wag") and can get to the point of you going totally out of control. Wind, road bumps, deviations in steering, and a host of other things can make it start. The only way to stop it is to slow down (using only the trailer brakes, NOT the truck brakes). It is ONLY due to not having enough weight on the tongue. Fix that, and you fix the sway. All other measures are ways to try and damp it down so it doesn't get started. But with enough energy (speed) it can come back, and at the higher speed, it may be much worse. If using "sway control", the goal is to raise the threshold of where it will start to way above any speed you would be traveling at. Adding tongue weight is far better. You'll hear 10-15% of the weight of the trailer. But in most cases 12% should be your low end. Try loading more stuff up front, more batteries, over the hitch bike racks, etc. to get the tongue weight up.

Side pushes (and "wobbly" handling) due to wind, "truck suck", rough roads and the like can seem like sway (at the beginning). Reducing those can also help reduce true sway from initiating. Sway controls, proper wd bars, better truck tires, better suspension, better weight distribution, bigger trucks and other items can all have a part in reducing/eliminating those issues.

So first is to get to a scale, and find out what everything weights. Then look at your TRUCK load capacities (payload on the door sticker). Report those back. From there you can get more meaningful advice to assist with the issue. Be prepared for possibly some follow up questions - size/kind of tires, additional weight in the vehicle, etc. as people try to assist.


2012 F150 Eco, 4x4, SCrew, Max Tow, HD Payload
2017 Grand Design Imagine 2670MK


Slowmover

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Posted: 12/11/19 07:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ron Gratz did this up years ago, I borrowed his Three Pass Scale Method and have pushed it heavily as it gives an unparalleled picture to the operator and all others who wish to help.

On the same day, consecutively:

1). Loaded for camping. Max fuel. Full propane & fresh water. All passengers aboard. Cross the CAT SCALE (get phone app) with hitch adjusted (tensioned) as at present.

2). Cross scale second time, EVERYTHING the same; EXCEPT all tension removed from hitch (don’t remove).

3). Drop trailer. Return to scale third time. Solo truck where all is as in (1).

See CAT website for any directions you may need. At end, go inside and get the three paper copies of the scale tickets. Post the four lines of info from each as above.

Also, from the TV door sticker: the axle limits Steer & Drive (front & rear).

Me, I’d start beforehand by using Andy Thomson's HITCH HINT column, “How to Set Your Torsion Bars”, from the RVLife article as my way to get the hitch roughed in at home. That, with the hitch manufacturers instructions. (Hitch bead tilted as far back as possible, one example)

Then, before setting out, get the cold overnight tire pressure readings. Once at the scale the actual load on each TV axle (with any hitch corrections) gives me the COFRECT basis for tire pressure (trailer tires are ALWAYS to maximum).

The result here is a start. A baseline.

We’d like to see the STEER AXLE weight in #1 & #3 to be the same. If they aren’t, adjust the hitch until it’s close.

This is where one makes evaluations which can be repeated. The highway feel is (will be once you’re finished) as if on rails.

Braking will also be improved. To the point you stop faster than the loaded tow vehicle while solo.

Get the tools. Borrow a friend (many heads make confusion more pleasurable) to do the rough-in. A SHERLINE Scale is a tool many of us like. The Dual Cam is the original, and still the best of the obsolete hitches. (A Hensley-patent hitch superceded them all more than 20-years back).

At the end, the WD is traditionally 1/3-1/3-1/3. Not perfectly, but enough that set is a rule of thumb.

And it’s why an 1,100-lb TW is the province of cars. It’s not a problem and hasn’t been since the latter 1960s.

Do the work. Get the numbers as above.

.


1990 35' SILVER STREAK Sterling, 9k GVWR
2004 DODGE RAM 2WD 305/555 ISB, QC SRW LB NV-5600, 9k GVWR
Hensley Arrow; 11-cpm solo, 17-cpm towing fuel cost

badsix

north bend or.

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Posted: 12/12/19 10:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lynnmor wrote:

How about this one?

I don't have sway problems but I did install one of these, for the price why not. I did tighten it up coming across the desert in east Oregon with about a 30-40mph side wind. I think it helped a little, again I don't have much problem.
just a side note I have a friend one of those that thinks if a little is ok then a lot is better. anyway I ask him how tight he sets his. he said you just have to play with it. he then said he tightened it real tight the first time and he couldn't turn the tow vehicle.
Jay D.

Lynnmor

Red Lion

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Posted: 12/12/19 11:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

badsix wrote:

Lynnmor wrote:

How about this one?

I don't have sway problems but I did install one of these, for the price why not. I did tighten it up coming across the desert in east Oregon with about a 30-40mph side wind. I think it helped a little, again I don't have much problem.
just a side note I have a friend one of those that thinks if a little is ok then a lot is better. anyway I ask him how tight he sets his. he said you just have to play with it. he then said he tightened it real tight the first time and he couldn't turn the tow vehicle.
Jay D.


What are you guys tightening, the handle or the bolt?





nickthehunter

Southgate, MI

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Posted: 12/12/19 07:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

They both will do the same thing provided you know how it works and what you are doing - regardless of what the directions say.

Lynnmor

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Posted: 12/14/19 03:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

nickthehunter wrote:

They both will do the same thing provided you know how it works and what you are doing - regardless of what the directions say.


As always, folks can't follow simple directions. You loosen the handle so that the sway control can be removed or installed. You tighten the handle when you want the sway control to work. There is no need for extreme tightening, it will work the same regardless of the torque applied. You use the bolt to adjust the amount of control. This device is so simple, but rarely are they adjusted correctly with all the misinformation out there.

wing_zealot

East of the Mississippi

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Posted: 12/15/19 07:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lynnmor wrote:

nickthehunter wrote:

They both will do the same thing provided you know how it works and what you are doing - regardless of what the directions say.


As always, folks can't follow simple directions. You loosen the handle so that the sway control can be removed or installed. You tighten the handle when you want the sway control to work. There is no need for extreme tightening, it will work the same regardless of the torque applied. You use the bolt to adjust the amount of control. This device is so simple, but rarely are they adjusted correctly with all the misinformation out there.
The only thing that matters is you get the proper amount of pressure on the bar from the friction pad. Doesn't matter how you get there.

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