Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: RV Lifestyle: Traveling Alone
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beachcomber_1

Alton, Illinois

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Posted: 12/04/19 01:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just an update. My wife and I had 52 good years. Camped somewhere in every year. From tent to various popups ans last to a class c motor-home. Towed a car since 2005. Chevy Malibu and now a Honda CRV.





mockturtle

AZ

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Posted: 12/04/19 02:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

IMO, it's all good. [emoticon]


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naturist

Lynchburg, VA

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Posted: 12/04/19 06:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My sympathies on the loss of your spouse. Mine is still here after 52 years of marriage, for which I am grateful. But I have done some traveling alone. She's always had a career that allowed only two weeks vacation at a crack, even though she's been with her current employer long enough to have gotten into the 7 or 8 weeks annual leave. This has left us with many a trip where I drag the TT out, and she flies to meet me. One year we decided to do a great circle around the Grand Canyon, starting in Vegas, where I had a professional conference, and hitting South Rim, North Rim, Bryce, Zion and points in between. We spent the entire two weeks making that circle, so she flew out, then flew back. I dragged the trailer there, then back alone. I've also served as a campground host by myself.

I'll second the "put out two chairs" suggestion, not as a security measure, but as a way to invite other folks over for a campfire and a cold adult beverage and the company they can bring. I've found that having some novel trick campfire helps break the ice. I've used a Swedish Candle (google it) sometimes, and other times a Solo Stove Bonfire. Throw a little of those colored flames stuff into the fire as well, and you'd be surprised how many folks on the way to/from the bathhouse will say hello. A friendly dog is also a magnet for attracting company.





LadyRVer

Florida

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Posted: 12/04/19 06:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My husband and I full-timed since 2004, although we owned our own lot in a RV resort. He passed away in 2015. I did all the driving, most of the work involved, he was not able to do a lot. Last year I decided I wanted to travel, sold the lot, took off with my cocker spaniel and traveled out west from FL. Am now back in FL, had a fantastic time. Things happened, but deal with it as you have to. No regrets. Never felt alone. Hope to have a couple of more good years of traveling. I am now 76. Seend things, done things, only dreamed about before.

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 12/04/19 07:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I haven't lost a spouse, but I do regularly camp and travel solo. Here are my thoughts:

I take my pets (2 dogs, parrot, plus 2 cats as of this year). The pets do ease some of the "loneliness". Dogs are great as hiking or exploring buddies. Cats are great for cuddling and comfort, and make for conversation starters. The parrot is great for having "interactive talk" as they are vocal.

If you can live your life at home alone, then you can camp alone. It's not much different. The parts that seem to be the hardest are: 1) eating alone; 2) not having someone to share the moment; and 3) fear of strangers.

1. This was hardest for me. But when I started doing non-RV travel alone, I either ate out alone or hid in my hotel room eating take out. I found that eating a late lunch rather than a timely dinner took a lot of the "people are staring at me" vibe away. A good book or a game on the tablet let me slow down the meal a bit. And the more I did it, the easier it got.

2. When something exciting happens, it can be a bit depressing not to have someone there to share it. That's where texting comes in. I just send a quick text to a friend back home giving a "the wildest thing just happened!" They text back asking what happened and I get to share the moment.

3. The fear issue is really personal. You have to do what makes you comfortable. If you can't find a solution to make you comfortable, then soloing may not be you.

I have my cameras whenever I'm out. I find it's a great way to enjoy the sights and I can spend hours taking photos without having a companion sighing in boredom.

I've never felt the need to join a "solo group". I have a small circle of friends who will meet up with me once in a while. I just tell them where and where I'll be and if they can come out they do. Like ppine, if I am camping nearby someone, I will invite them out to my campsite for the day/evening.


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jfak7670

New York

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Posted: 12/08/19 09:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Before marriage I've travelled alone and I didn't feel lonely. But, travelling solo has it's pros and cons.

For starters, there is one fact I'd like to note. Sometimes it happens that people really want to travell to see the different countries, cities, but they just afraid doing this alone. They just wait for the right moment to come, when their friends or relatives can go with them, but it's actually only upsetting. I had it as well. But once, I had a very good opportunity to go abroad and thought that I shouldn't whistle for a wind and just used my chance and went alone.

So, that trip was very exciting and challenging in the same time, because I had never travelled alone and I wanted to discover what I'm capable of when I am out of my comfort zone. That was my first journey that jolted me into travelling solo experience.

So, these is my positives and negatives about RV travelling:
Positives:
- you meet people and situations that teach you things that can't be learned when you are in your comfort zone.
- you have an endless amount of opportunities to meet people, make friends and that is one of the most exciting things about travelling.
- travelling solo turned me into a good photographer. I had all the time in the world to take some amazing pictures.
- the entire decision making authority is yours and there is no one to influence you.

Negatives:
- As I've mentioned the entire decision making process is in your hands. It can be a drawback as well, because you don't have someone to help you and give you a piece of advice. So, trust your instincts and sometimes don't be afraid to ask for help from strangers. I mean, the world is not without good people. There are people everywhere willing to help.
- you don't have someone to share the moment. And even if you send a photo to your friend about how exciting the place was he/she won't share it to the full.

Veebyes

Bermuda & Maryland Eastern Shore

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Posted: 12/09/19 04:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not something I want to think about. We are very much a team, right down to the dumping chores. The subject has come up from time to time. What if? My suggestion to her is to keep at it. Downsize to a comphy class B & keep at it. When minor technical things go wrong she is not helpless. Many years of being a boat woman & many more years of passing tools & being involved in all repairs have put her in a good position to go it alone.

She is the social butterfly & very quick to make new friends in CGs so she would adapt to solo very quickly.


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mr. ed

Tucson, AZ

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Posted: 12/16/19 12:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

steveh27 wrote:

I never married and travel alone.


I'm a long-time divorcee and have RV'd full timed many years. I find I prefer to live alone, although I have many friends around the country. IMO, I can't think of a better lifestyle for a single person than to be a full time RVer. Unfortunately, a sudden disability took my out of full timing over 5 years ago. I'd quickly return to the lifestyle if, by some miracle, my disability went away. [emoticon]


Mr. Ed (fulltiming since 1987)
Life is fragile. Handle with prayer.

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