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 > Thoughts on studded tires

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thomas201

Eastern Panhandle WV

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Posted: 12/07/19 08:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am another just a good tire and carry chains guy. Thanks for reminding me to put the chains back in the escape. I gotta go to the garage now.

All I could afford

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Posted: 12/07/19 08:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Modern stud-less winter tires come very close to studded performance without the noise and pavement wear on dry days


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Grit dog

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Posted: 12/08/19 09:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

colliehauler wrote:

Modern winter tires are what you see around here. No one runs studded tires because of there poor performance on dry pavement. Are highway dept does a good job of keeping the roads in a good condition. They are banned in 11 states and others have restrictions on when they can be used.


And the biggest hill in KS is a freeway overpass....
I've driven through KS and NE in blizzards in 1 wheeler peeler sedans and pickups with whatever tires happened to be on them.
Good discussion points, but some are not considering the climate and topography.
SE AK, the coastal areas are prone to the wet snow and ice in early and late season (and mid season, the more it warms up, up there). Similar conditions to the PNW coastal areas. Add in hills/mountains, and plenty of steep grades, even in town and you may see more need for studs than you think. Now add in if its not just an in town grocery getter, there's more remote areas where service for a tow or a push is not readily available.
Are studs "mandatory"? Nope. Are they preferred by some? Yup. Are they the best traction option on glare ice? Yup. (Save for chains, but chains are a pain in the ____ for daily driving, obviously.)


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

PA12DRVR

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Posted: 12/09/19 12:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for all the input....wasn't meant to start "stud vs. studless" debate, that decision's been made. A not so minor part of the decision is what's most likely to keep the wife either out of the ditch or avoiding calling me for a lift. Even an incremental improvement on that aspect is worth something....


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PA12DRVR

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Posted: 12/09/19 12:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

...and to chime in with Grit Dog's last post, every vehicle in my household (except the Jeep Wrangler) has tire chains as part of the "carried-in-case-of..." equipment commencing about 15-Oct. But having done more than one excursion wherein the DW's car, my truck, and the spare truck all needed to be chained up to get out of the driveway (and then chain-off once on the secondary road), anything that incrementally reduces the need for chains is a win in my book.

Grit dog

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Posted: 12/09/19 02:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

True ^. And only people who haven't used chains say things like "Well just chain up when it gets slippery..."

"Well what a little pain in the @ss that is...." lol

ksss

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Posted: 12/09/19 05:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Hanging iron" does suck. We worked a job in Big Sky one Winter, at near the top of the ski hill and we had to chain up to get loaded equipment trailers to the job, EVERY TIME. It was miserable, not as miserable as sliding backward down the hill with an excavator on the back miserable, but it sucked never the less.


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crosscheck

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Posted: 12/09/19 06:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Opinions on personal preferences regarding studded/non-studded snow tires are numerous judging by the replies. The one thing that can be agreed upon are the advances in true winter tires and studs over the years.

We lived in snow/ice country for many years in north central BC and good traction on ice and snow was sometimes the difference between life and death. There always seemed not a day went by when you had to travel on steep driveways or icy roads while going to work or transporting kids to their tournaments to towns that were many hours drive away not to mention up the ski hill which steep grade roads were mainly hard packed snow and sometimes ice.

I can remember the first time trying on a set of Blizzaks on our 4x4 Toyota van and being able to zip up our 16% driveway better than old style hard conpound snow tires with minimal problems. That was my first experience with soft rubber, true winter tires. The only down side was that because the winters were fairly long, you only got 2 seasons out of set of Blizzaks.

We now live in the south to where there is less winter but still drive 4000' vertical from our house to the ski hill at least 6 days a week in the winter and many other trips over the mountain passes includding the "Coke" and Coquahalla connector sections of BC roads frequently driving on very icy/slippery sections at high speeds. Our tires of choice are true winter tires with studs on both our F350 4x4 and the AWD Rav4. Truck has Coopers with studs installed at the local dealer and Rav runs a set of Hakkapelitta 9's which has I think 9 rows of factory installed, 3 sided modern studs which provide less damage to roads and incredible grip in every winter condition.

Dangerous winter driving conditions where there is potential for bad accidents includding injuries and death quite often do not include roads with a build up of snow. Most drivers slow down so if there are accidents they tend to be fender benders. Many serious winter accidents however are caused by black ice on a section of highway where motorists are travelling at least the posted speed which is fast for dangerous winter roads. You can't see the thin layer of black ice and the first time you realize that there is black ice on the road is when you start to lose control on a curve or downhill when going the speed limit. By this time it is too late. This is where modern studded snow tires out perform by a wide margin studless tires even with good winter tires.

For my own safety and my families, I can put up with a bit of extra noise for much better handling on potentially hazardous winter roads.

I learned a long time ago from the northern loggers who equiped their pick ups with studded snow tires for their daily drives to work on very treacheous, icy winter haul roads with very few accidents. "Better to have them and not need them, than need them and not have them".

Dave


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deltabravo

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Posted: 12/09/19 07:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

If studs are allowed where you live, but you intend to travel out of state, check stud restrictions. Some states have outlawed them, other states have restrictions on the dates they can be used.


Washington is outlawing them within a year or two. I don't know what the date it.

If I google it, I'd probably find the date fast.


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drsteve

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Posted: 12/10/19 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Studded tires were illegal for years in Michigan, but I see they are now allowed in the UP.


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