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FunTwoDrv

NC

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Posted: 12/10/19 08:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP...When discussing this topic with Sprinter owners, a few subjects seem to come up quite often; Fuel mileage, storage capacity and towing capacity. Fuel mileage seems to always be a "positive". Cargo capacity can be tight and towing is all about weight. By that I mean, the capacity to tow can be greatly influenced by GCWR as opposed to hitch specs.
Familiarize yourself with these as it relates to your travel expectations and you should be quite comfortable with your decision.

Gary

Jayco-noslide

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Posted: 12/10/19 09:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I only have 1 complaint and it's a huge one: price. Or specifically what you get in terms of size and ammenities for the buck. A small Class C offers much more bang for the buck. And don't think the MPG of the Mercedes is enough to offset the price; not even close.


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ron.dittmer

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Posted: 12/10/19 09:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jayco-noslide wrote:

I only have 1 complaint and it's a huge one: price. Or specifically what you get in terms of size and ammenities for the buck. A small Class C offers much more bang for the buck. And don't think the MPG of the Mercedes is enough to offset the price; not even close.
Especially as of late since MB upgraded the Sprinter with all the current-day high tech safety features. The price of the chassis increased immensely.....maybe by $10,000. They were already a bit pricey, but now they are ridiculous. You got to really love the brand to buy the product now. I don't see there being any other justification. In my opinion, the gain in fuel economy did not justify the extra cost to purchase and maintain the vehicle along with higher prices for it's required diesel formula. Now today it is even harder to justify with the steep increase in cost to purchase a Sprinter.

If only the Ford Transit chassis could handle as heavy of a load as the Sprinter. Then it would provide an affordable alternative.

I think the new 2021 E450 coming out with the new 7.3L pushrod engine will also include current-day safety features. I hope there won't be a significant price hike as seen with the MB. If so, the time for an affordable brand new E350 or E450 based motor home could be right now.

* This post was edited 12/10/19 04:40pm by ron.dittmer *


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


gemsworld

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Posted: 12/10/19 04:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We purchased a new 2019 Winnebago Navion 24V (same unit as the View) in January. We have logged about 12,000 miles so far, including a 7,900 mile trip across the U.S. and Canada this spring. We averaged 13.4 MPG in that trip, including driving 75 MPH in western states and having to deal with strong headwinds for several days. Naturally, the MPG improves driving at lower speeds.

We like the cabin in the Sprinter much better than the Ford chassis cabin. The Sprinter cabin is much roomier and taller than the Ford cabin that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield.

As far as driving up the mountains, the Sprinter is a slug and you will be relegated to the right lane in steep climbs. I occasionally tow a utility trailer weighing about 3,000 lbs when loaded and the Sprinter handles the load very comfortably. I have seen several Sprinters towing heavy Jeeps.

I haven't had the need for service yet so I can't speak for the cost of routine maintenance. Having owned 3 Mercedes vehicles I expect the cost to be on the high side.

Having previously owned a Ford chassis class C, which I liked quite a bit, I prefer the Sprinter moho better.





ron.dittmer

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Posted: 12/10/19 04:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gemsworld wrote:

We averaged 13.4 MPG in that trip, including driving 75 MPH in western states and having to deal with strong headwinds for several days.
It sure seems that no matter which direction a motor home is driven, it deals with a significant head wind. Murphy's Law loves to play with motor homes.

Desert Captain

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Posted: 12/10/19 07:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"The Sprinter cabin is much roomier and taller than the Ford cabin that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield. "

Sorry, but for a thread that has had a refreshing amount of honest reports/opinions about the Mercedes chassis Class C's I finally have to take exception to this post. There is no Class C {B+} with less interior volume/room than a Mercedes. Oh, and do not get me started on how uncomfortable the Mercedes seats are, compared to the Ford multi adjustable power seats the difference is day and night.

The last thing a Mercedes is... is much roomier. My 24' E-350 Class C has 7' of head room throughout the coach. I would venture to state {without fear of inaccurate correction} that no Mercedes Class C has that much headroom. I have yet too see any Mercedes chassis Class C even close to the 101" of width our C has.

My biggest objection to the Mercedes Class C's is two fold - they are MUCH smaller inside and the ridiculous cost to buy {not to mention maintain} one vs a Ford or Chevy chassis. Yes they can get 15 mpg though many do not. No they will not even come close to towing like a V-10 or large V-8 Chevy.

If Mercedes floats your boat more power to ya {you will need it} but please folks... let's keep it honest here for the benefit of those who do not know any better.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.





pnichols

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Posted: 12/10/19 08:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

"The Sprinter cabin is much roomier and taller than the Ford cabin that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield. "

Sorry, but for a thread that has had a refreshing amount of honest reports/opinions about the Mercedes chassis Class C's I finally have to take exception to this post. There is no Class C {B+} with less interior volume/room than a Mercedes. Oh, and do not get me started on how uncomfortable the Mercedes seats are, compared to the Ford multi adjustable power seats the difference is day and night.

The last thing a Mercedes is... is much roomier. My 24' E-350 Class C has 7' of head room throughout the coach. I would venture to state {without fear of inaccurate correction} that no Mercedes Class C has that much headroom. I have yet too see any Mercedes chassis Class C even close to the 101" of width our C has.

My biggest objection to the Mercedes Class C's is two fold - they are MUCH smaller inside and the ridiculous cost to buy {not to mention maintain} one vs a Ford or Chevy chassis. Yes they can get 15 mpg though many do not. No they will not even come close to towing like a V-10 or large V-8 Chevy.

If Mercedes floats your boat more power to ya {you will need it} but please folks... let's keep it honest here for the benefit of those who do not know any better.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.


Well stated above.

I don't know what the interior ceiling height is in a Sprinter based Class C (B+?), but what makes me nervous about their construction is their height versus the width (stance) between their rear dually sets.

The Sprinter based motorhomes look too tall for their width. They look to me like they could be blown over if caught just right in a sudden violent cross-wind. Even in moderate highway cross-winds, the ones I've observed from behind seem to lean a lot from the wind pushing.

However I'm pretty sure that most owners or prospective owners of Sprinter based Class C (B+?) motorhomes don't notice, or pay any attention to, or pay any heed to ... this.

* This post was edited 12/10/19 08:48pm by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

gemsworld

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Posted: 12/10/19 08:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

"The Sprinter cabin is much roomier and taller than the Ford cabin that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield. "

Sorry, but for a thread that has had a refreshing amount of honest reports/opinions about the Mercedes chassis Class C's I finally have to take exception to this post. There is no Class C {B+} with less interior volume/room than a Mercedes. Oh, and do not get me started on how uncomfortable the Mercedes seats are, compared to the Ford multi adjustable power seats the difference is day and night.

The last thing a Mercedes is... is much roomier. My 24' E-350 Class C has 7' of head room throughout the coach. I would venture to state {without fear of inaccurate correction} that no Mercedes Class C has that much headroom. I have yet too see any Mercedes chassis Class C even close to the 101" of width our C has.

My biggest objection to the Mercedes Class C's is two fold - they are MUCH smaller inside and the ridiculous cost to buy {not to mention maintain} one vs a Ford or Chevy chassis. Yes they can get 15 mpg though many do not. No they will not even come close to towing like a V-10 or large V-8 Chevy.

If Mercedes floats your boat more power to ya {you will need it} but please folks... let's keep it honest here for the benefit of those who do not know any better.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.


Perhaps you should have read my post a bit closer. I specifically said the Sprinter cabin is roomier compared to a Ford chassis cabin. I never compared the coach portion of the two.

Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 12/11/19 07:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gemsworld wrote:

Desert Captain wrote:

"The Sprinter cabin is much roomier and taller than the Ford cabin that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield. "

Sorry, but for a thread that has had a refreshing amount of honest reports/opinions about the Mercedes chassis Class C's I finally have to take exception to this post. There is no Class C {B+} with less interior volume/room than a Mercedes. Oh, and do not get me started on how uncomfortable the Mercedes seats are, compared to the Ford multi adjustable power seats the difference is day and night.

The last thing a Mercedes is... is much roomier. My 24' E-350 Class C has 7' of head room throughout the coach. I would venture to state {without fear of inaccurate correction} that no Mercedes Class C has that much headroom. I have yet too see any Mercedes chassis Class C even close to the 101" of width our C has.

My biggest objection to the Mercedes Class C's is two fold - they are MUCH smaller inside and the ridiculous cost to buy {not to mention maintain} one vs a Ford or Chevy chassis. Yes they can get 15 mpg though many do not. No they will not even come close to towing like a V-10 or large V-8 Chevy.

If Mercedes floats your boat more power to ya {you will need it} but please folks... let's keep it honest here for the benefit of those who do not know any better.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.



Perhaps you should have read my post a bit closer. I specifically said the Sprinter cabin is roomier compared to a Ford chassis cabin. I never compared the coach portion of the two.




No need for me to reread your post... You stated:

"that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield. "

and I replied:

"There is no Class C {B+} with less interior volume/room than a Mercedes."

You simply confirmed my theory that they are much smaller in volume by pointing out the illusion of size you get when sitting in "the house". Spend a little time in an actual class A and the illusion will disappear like smoke in the wind.

This also points out that most Mercedes chassis' have fewer and smallish windows. One often needs to duck down just to see out except forward with no view at all to the rear. The lack of interior width along with Murphy Beds and rear extending slides to create temporary sleeping accommodations exacerbates this.

Another issue for me is the galley set up. I like to cook but in most Mercedes would find it necessary to bend down to see what is in the pan on the stove to get under the vent/hood {and it is a small two burner - one normal size with a second tiny burner - try putting two pans to the flame at one time... good luck with that}.

The microwaves are often the size of a shoebox and few even offer a conventional oven as an option. Counter space is at a premium if you have any at all. The refrigerators, out of necessity {lack of available space} are much smaller than in conventional Class C;'s {Ford/Chevy chassis'}.
In our E-350 Class C I have a full 3 burner stove top with a conventional oven and a microwave as large as the one in our home. Counter space is enhanced by a foldup counter extension.

Once or twice a year we wander the local RV Show browsing a dozen or more Mercedes Class C/B+'s along with the new crop of Ford and Chevy models looking at the features and space being discussed here.

If a more compact coach works for you and money is no object Mercedes offers lots of options {models} to choose from but they really are a different animal when it comes to actually using them out on the road.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

[emoticon]

* This post was edited 12/11/19 07:41am by Desert Captain *

ron.dittmer

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Posted: 12/11/19 07:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

.....but what makes me nervous about their construction is their height versus the width (stance) between their rear dually sets.

The Sprinter based motorhomes look too tall for their width. They look to me like they could be blown over if caught just right in a sudden violent cross-wind. Even in moderate highway cross-winds, the ones I've observed from behind seem to lean a lot from the wind pushing.

However I'm pretty sure that most owners or prospective owners of Sprinter based Class C (B+?) motorhomes don't notice, or pay any attention to, or pay any heed to ... this.
I have to agree with you concerning this point.

My own observation of Sprinter motor homes is that most of them are constructed too tall for their narrow width dual rear wheel axle. I have watched them maneuver around on irregular unpaved parking areas in truck stops. More than once my heart skipped a beat watching them tip sideways so extremely. I can't imagine what goes on inside the cabinets. I also see them getting tossed around on the open road from passing trucks and significant cross winds.

I am perplexed that Sprinter owners don't complain or discuss any of it on RV forums like this one. There are plenty of E350/E450 discussions over the same thing, with replies sharing practical and very affordable solutions.

I wonder if there are after-market heavy duty front and rear stabilizer bars available for the Sprinter. It would not surprise me if there is nothing available because MB is very stern on keeping everything MB down to the motor oil. Anything not MB voids their warranty. What a scam MB has going there.

I lead a team of volunteer mechanics at THIS AUTOMOTIVE CHARITY within our church. We work on all kinds of older high-mileage vehicles including Mercedes and BMW. Those two brands will never be seen in my garage at home.....and I am 100% German. The Germans can keep their German engineering.

PS: If you click on that link called THIS AUTOMOTIVE CHARITY and scroll down, there is a 2 minute video on the charity. You might find the video interesting because there is no other charity that actually uses the donated vehicles to help people with their transportation needs. CARS for kids, CARS for vets, those types of vehicle-donation charities liquidate the vehicles at wholesale auctions to support another mission. This charity goes deep with their donated vehicles. Your donated vehicle could be gifted to someone in need of reliable transportation. The most common scenario is a single mother with small children, but all kinds of people qualify. Whether given another vehicle, or repairing a vehicle already owned (helping owners with repairs is most popular) the recipients do go through an extensive screening process to assure the charity is helping the right people. It is one of the most rewarding things I have ever been a part of, been serving now in my 23rd year.

* This post was last edited 12/11/19 08:26am by ron.dittmer *   View edit history

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