Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Flying J and Pilot moving toward B20 diesel?
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 > Flying J and Pilot moving toward B20 diesel?

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Lwiddis

Morro Bay, CA

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Posted: 12/22/19 08:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No one or group will stop the B20 diesel fuel “invasion” just like the introduction of unleaded gasoline.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watts solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL pole for flags. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, USF&WS, state & county camps. Bicyclist! 14 year Army vet - 11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560)


pigman1

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Posted: 12/22/19 08:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You get a double hit when using the B20. As mentioned, you're paying for a less expensive fuel that the dealer sells at the more expensive price, and then you get the second hit where your fuel mileage drops because there's less BTU's (energy) in a gallon of B20 than in a gallon of straight #2 diesel. 139,000BTU in #2 diesel vs 126,700BTU in a B20 diesel. Welcome to the "how do we screw the consumer again?" game.


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otrfun

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Posted: 12/22/19 09:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When we had our 5th wheel we typically got fuel at FlyingJ/Loves/TA truck stops due to the lack of maneuverability at smaller stations. Unfortunately (like the OP mentioned), it seems most truck stops these days sell B20. Now that we have an in-bed camper we can now fuel up anywhere. We use Gasbuddy and try to stick with major retailers like Shell. Rarely use B20 anymore.

It's my understanding that suppliers can mix as much as 5% bio without any reference to bio on the pump.

MDKMDK

Canada

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Posted: 12/22/19 09:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MDKMDK wrote:

gemsworld wrote:

Thanks for posting the list. As I suspected, all but one of the stations in CA now sell B20. In AZ, only 3 stations show B5 and the rest don't say the type of diesel being sold.


No problem.
You know you can use up to B20 in the MB V6 as long as you keep an eye on the oil level, and some owners have said they shorten the oil/fuel filter and oil change intervals.

MB lays it out in the OM under (go figure) "B20 fuels with bio-diesel content" fuel.
In my 2017 Sprinter manual it's a short blerb on/near page 275.

"B20 fuels with bio-diesel content
! Continuous use of B20 fuel can lead to fuel
filter clogging and injector deposits. This can
cause engine performance degradation.
Injector deposits can cause the engine oil
level to rise due to unburned fuel washing into
the oil pan. This can cause engine mechanical
damage.

To avoid damages and performance degradation:
- Fill up with ULSD (B5 or less) whenever
possible.
- Regularly monitor your engine oil level if
you use B20 fuel on a regular basis.
- Strictly follow the oil change intervals quoted
in the instrument cluster and within
your maintenance booklet.
- Use only engine oils and filters approved for
use in your vehicle.
- If you do not plan to drive your vehicle for
several weeks, fill your vehicle’s fuel tank in
advance with ULSD fuel.

For more information, consult the gas station
staff. The fatty acid methyl ester B5 or B20 label
on the fuel pump must clearly state that the
standard for ULSD is complied with. If the marking
does not make this clear, do not refuel from
that pump.
Do not refuel with any fuels that have not been
approved for your vehicle.
For more information about refueling
(> page 125)."


I should have added that I use PFJ and the other truck stops for their DEF at the truck lane pumps, but rarely for diesel any more, unless I can be sure it's B5 (maybe B10?) or less. Since they're all heading for B5 to B20 at all their pumps, I'll just use them for the amenities, but not the fuel, unless I have no choice. When I drove gas engined motorhomes, I used truck stops all the time. Too bad, because they've lost most of my $$$ business, and they do have some nice loyalty perks for regular fuel users. The coffee is usually great, and the other amenities are still worth stopping once in a while.


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2018 (2017 Sprinter Cab Chassis) Navion24V + 2016 JKU (sold @ ????)
2016 Sunstar 26HE, V10, 3V, 6 Speed (sold @ 4600 miles)
2002 Roadtrek C190P (sold @ 315,000kms)

theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 12/22/19 02:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

starlord wrote:

...NOT supposed to run any bio of any percentage in the system (or so Ford tells me).

Never Ford diesels are certified for up B20.

down home

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Posted: 12/22/19 07:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pigman1 wrote:

You get a double hit when using the B20. As mentioned, you're paying for a less expensive fuel that the dealer sells at the more expensive price, and then you get the second hit where your fuel mileage drops because there's less BTU's (energy) in a gallon of B20 than in a gallon of straight #2 diesel. 139,000BTU in #2 diesel vs 126,700BTU in a B20 diesel. Welcome to the "how do we screw the consumer again?" game.


Don't forget we subsidize BioDiesel production with oru taxes

jolvi

SW Missouri

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Posted: 12/22/19 09:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a diesel car and it says #2 diesel or B5 only. I believe that every time I have stopped at a station it says #2 or B5 specifically. That being said at least in the state we live in B5 to B20 just have to state it is between B5 and B20. Checked with state and it is true and a federal law so it can be anywhere between the points. By the way called company that has the guess ratio sign and they cannot tell you ratio depends on bobber of the day.

pigman1

Delaware

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Posted: 12/24/19 05:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

down home wrote:

pigman1 wrote:

You get a double hit when using the B20. As mentioned, you're paying for a less expensive fuel that the dealer sells at the more expensive price, and then you get the second hit where your fuel mileage drops because there's less BTU's (energy) in a gallon of B20 than in a gallon of straight #2 diesel. 139,000BTU in #2 diesel vs 126,700BTU in a B20 diesel. Welcome to the "how do we screw the consumer again?" game.


Don't forget we subsidize BioDiesel production with our taxes
Yep, thanks for reminding me of that one. We pay our taxes so they can subsidize the alcohol industry and sell you a less efficient fuel, give you less mileage, and make you think you're "saving the environment" On the last issue, If the brewer's grain (What's left after the alcohol is distilled) can't be disposed of very closely to the alcohol plant, there is a net cost that has to be added to the cost of production, which it seldom, if ever, is shown. Another way the government hides the cost of alcohol is by generous carbon credits that can sold to other high pollution producing industries. So not only are alcohol producers getting direct tax advantages, the drivers are subsidizing other high pollution industries. So much for environmentally friendly fuel. Politics at it's worst.

97chevor

US

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Posted: 12/24/19 06:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think this is more state regulations than fuel station choice. Personally, traveling across the country I have encountered regen problems from buying fuel in western states. I think it is not only the high amount of bio but what the bio is made from.

Mike Poorman

Pacific Northwest

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Posted: 12/27/19 04:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

starlord wrote:

...NOT supposed to run any bio of any percentage in the system (or so Ford tells me).

Never Ford diesels are certified for up B20.


Just checked the manual for my 2019 GMC Sierra 3500 HD and that

on page 47 of the 2019 Duramax Diesel Supplement they state

"Do not use a diesel blend containing more than 20% biodiesel by volume"

So it appears that B20 is acceptable.

I will stop by my local GMC dealer and check with a real person to make sure that the truck can actually run on B20 with out issues.

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