Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Down a truly rough road in my class C?
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 > Down a truly rough road in my class C?

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RobertRyan

Australia

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Posted: 12/30/19 06:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Garyhaupt wrote:

You must sell RV's for a living.


Gary 

No par for the course here, going off road is done by 40% of RV'ers in Australia as against maybe 10% in the US/ Canada

T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

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Posted: 12/30/19 08:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RobertRyan wrote:

Garyhaupt wrote:

You must sell RV's for a living.


Gary 

No par for the course here, going off road is done by 40% of RV'ers in Australia as against maybe 10% in the US/ Canada

I've always been very impressed with Australian products. The Australian items I've owned were top quality. I often look at Australian RV's on the web, and they look top notch as well. In America, there is usually a disclaimer in many owners manuals that states "Not designed for off road use" Particularly travel trailers are more prone to break the welds at the shackle frame interface when taken off road.


Retired Anesthetist. LTP. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. Between rigs right now.. Wife and daughter. Four cats which we must obey.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 01/01/20 03:13pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

DrewE wrote:

pnichols wrote:


BTW, I have a theory regarding how a washboard road surface comes about: Maaaaaaybe from folks down through the years before the washboard existed driving too fast on the road surface. Perhaps related to the torque on drive axles being applied via a series of pulses from an internal combustion engine's up and down piston motion? I'll bet that roads didn't get "washboarded" in the good old horse-and-buggy days.


The engine vibration has nothing to do with washboarding; it's at a wildly different frequency (at least a few octaves higher). According to the very quick "research" I've done, the main contributors seem to be the speed of traffic--below maybe 5 mph or so it doesn't occur at all--the amount of traffic, and the susceptibility of the road material to be moved about by wheels going over it, which in turn depends on its makeup and the general climatic conditions: whether it's muddy, dusty, etc.

It was likely a far less prevalent problem in horse-and-buggy days due to the slower speed of travel. That does not mean the roads were not rough, of course; horse shoes and skinny iron-bound wheels can tear up dirt pretty well under the right (wrong?) conditions.


I wasn't referring to engine vibration.

The (heavy) engine flywheel notwithstanding, what I had in mind was the diameter of the drive tires - versus vehicle speed - versus crankshaft RPM - versus piston up/down motion causing their power pushes to make the crankshaft torque come in a bunch of "rapid spurts" ... all this interacting together to cause the drive tires to kindof "hop" down the road and hence eventually carve out a series of lateral ripples in a flat and soft road surface that originally was smooth. As time goes on, the lateral ripples only get worse as drive tires continue to hop more violently and dig out the ripples deeper and deeper.

I've scene how vehicles rip down those desert roads trying to "smooth out" the washboarding -> washboarding that maybe was itself originally started by vehicles ripping too fast down those roads when they were smooth, long ago. There's always an excuse to drive fast everywhere and always an eventual price to be paid, IMHO. [emoticon]


Pinichols, no that’s not what causes washboards. It’s simply repeated traction/loss of traction that is exaggerated more as the bumps get worse.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

Chum lee

Albuquerque, NM

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Posted: 01/03/20 01:24pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One important factor which I learned as a pilot. Time changes everything, mostly due to weather. Don't assume the road will be in the same condition on your way out as it was on your way in. The weight of your vehicle may also change, . . . . . significantly, which affects how it handles in the muck.

Chum lee

That said, we made the trip to Chaco Canyon off I-40 @ Thoreau. (Hwy 371) When we got to the dirt portion, (Hwy 57) it had just been graded the day before. The dirt road was smoother and in better condition than many paved roads in New Mexico. It rained for two days while at the canyon. The way out was passable but treacherous. Several hours with the power washer later, no worse for wear. Talk about caked on mud, . . . no, . . . . . lets not!

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 01/03/20 03:32pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My experience crossing a "dip" in the road resulted in the rear of my coach getting hung up as the wheels sunk in a soft spot. Using the hydraulic levelers and wood/rocks we lifted the coach filled in the dip and were once again on level ground. The overhang in the back can be deceiving.
I travel down washboard roads and allow sufficient time so as not to have everything fly out of the cabinets. patience grasshopper.

RobertRyan

Australia

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Posted: 01/09/20 01:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit Dog wrote:

Pinichols, no that’s not what causes washboards. It’s simply repeated traction/loss of traction that is exaggerated more as the bumps get worse.


Quote:

Washboarding or corrugation of roads comprises a series of ripples, which occur with the passage of wheels rolling over unpaved roads at speeds sufficient to cause bouncing of the wheel on the initially unrippled surface and take on the appearance of a laundry washboard.

Wikipedia article on wash boarding
Wikipedia Article on Washboarding

* This post was last edited 01/11/20 05:11am by an administrator/moderator *   View edit history

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