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canoe on top

Denver, CO, US

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Posted: 02/02/20 04:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a Nash and now have an Arctic Fox, both Northwood.Have storm windows for both which makes a huge difference. Been to zero and a bit below a number of times with no problems.She will need a generator if no hookups. Don't forget chains for the trailer. You may never use them but, in most states, if they are required, you need them for the trailer too. 4X4 is almost a necessity for tow vehicle. I've used 4WD, low range when descending mountain passes with snow and ice. It allows you to roll along nice and slow. Northwood encloses the dump valves in the tank compartments. If the valves are exposed, they will freeze.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Posted: 02/03/20 02:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Vintage465 wrote:

If your trailer has a good solar setup and a generator for backup the winter camping locations you describe you'd be fine. I'm partial to Northwood and Outdoor RV(ORV), but in all fairness, most any half way decent trailer will work in high twenty's to forty's and do fine. As stated earlier in the post, Nevada, Arizona winters are different story. We boondocked with 16-24 degree nights and started loosing ground with batteries about a 10th of volt a day. After 4 days I was at 12.3-12.4 volts. Then we moved to another location and it was regularly 7-14 degrees but we had hookups. The issue of power and gas is conquerable. The big issue is going to be moisture and managing that.....as mentioned earlier.
In my previous post I forgot to mention the other reason for my Generator use.... A big dehumidifier. This keeps the moisture under control, and puts out a little heat. That and being able to close the TT up tight saves a lot of propane. We do crack a window next to the stove and run the exhaust vent while cooking,as that puts too much humididty into the air faster than the dehumidifier can remove it.


Huntindog
100% boondocking
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ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 02/03/20 03:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I like Nash besides the ones you mentioned.
These discussions always make me laugh. I just came from Elko, NV a mining town with below zero winters. Don't tell all of those people living in RVs that they are not supposed to be there.

Having a covered under carriage makes a big difference.

kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 02/03/20 03:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Huntindog wrote:

Vintage465 wrote:

If your trailer has a good solar setup and a generator for backup the winter camping locations you describe you'd be fine. I'm partial to Northwood and Outdoor RV(ORV), but in all fairness, most any half way decent trailer will work in high twenty's to forty's and do fine. As stated earlier in the post, Nevada, Arizona winters are different story. We boondocked with 16-24 degree nights and started loosing ground with batteries about a 10th of volt a day. After 4 days I was at 12.3-12.4 volts. Then we moved to another location and it was regularly 7-14 degrees but we had hookups. The issue of power and gas is conquerable. The big issue is going to be moisture and managing that.....as mentioned earlier.
In my previous post I forgot to mention the other reason for my Generator use.... A big dehumidifier. This keeps the moisture under control, and puts out a little heat. That and being able to close the TT up tight saves a lot of propane. We do crack a window next to the stove and run the exhaust vent while cooking,as that puts too much humididty into the air faster than the dehumidifier can remove it.


Good advice, exactly what we do.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 02/03/20 04:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Edd505 wrote:

Why would you take an RV up in the passes to ski? Its a couple hr drive from the coast, rent a room at the resort or in the area when you want to spend the weekend. Way safer that taking an RV into the mountains in the winter for a weekend.


Because it's fun. And most of our ski "resorts" have few to no accommodations at the ski hill, or even nearby.

Different scene than most of the Rockies ski resorts. Think Sandia Crest and you have to drive back down to Tramway or out to Rio Rancho for a room.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
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deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 02/04/20 06:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Freeway Flyer 05 wrote:

Can you folks suggest any other brands or lines to check out?


Check out the Nash line, it's a lower cost RV from Northwood MFG, who also builds the Arctic Fox.

I ended up buying a TimberRidge 24RLS

* This post was edited 12/17/20 07:07am by deltabravo *


2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
2018 Arctic Fox 992 with an Onan 2500i "quiet" model generator

Freeway Flyer 05

Pacific Northwest

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Posted: 02/06/20 11:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All good info, thanks, she is heading to the Seattle RV show this weekend. If they make her a deal, she will be calling me to come get it. (Her truck isn't ready yet.)

deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 12/17/20 07:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

richardcoxid wrote:

I understand that the Northwood Fox line is Aluminum framed and the Nash (same manuf.) is wood framed if that makes any difference.


As of the 2021 Model year, the Nash is now aluminum framed laminated walls like the AF.

TECMike

Texas

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Posted: 01/27/21 09:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Deltabravo is right. Nash is now aluminum framed, according to their website. This is causing me and my wife to now consider the Nash 23D, as we like shorter trailers.

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