Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Amp hours
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Amp hours

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
CavemanCharlie

Storden,MN

Senior Member

Joined: 03/01/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/12/20 06:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As other people have said the fan in the furnace is the big draw. Try to avoid running that.

If you convert your camper lights to LED bulbs they will use very little electricity and you can get by without using the flashlights so much.

Sorry I can not answer your question. I'm just trying to give suggestions that will help.

beemerphile1

Ohio

Senior Member

Joined: 04/20/2007

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 04/12/20 07:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Guessing that you have somewhere between 210 and 230 ah of battery your 300 watts of solar is sufficient. There wouldn't be much benefit to adding more solar without adding more batteries.


Build a life you don't need a vacation from.

2016 Silverado 3500HD DRW D/A 4x4
2018 Keystone Cougar 26RBS
2006 Weekend Warrior FK1900


deltabravo

Spokane, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 09/08/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/13/20 06:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Camper8251 wrote:

Nobody will be able to answer this for you. Way to many variables.
Need a meter or something else..


Yep.

You need an amphour meter. I have a Victron BMV712


2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
2009 Arctic Fox 811 (bought new 11/9/09)
2018 Timber Ridge 24RLS (bought pre-owned 3/12/20)
2008 Haulmark 8.5x20 toy box trailer

Vintage465

Prunedale CA.

Senior Member

Joined: 05/02/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/13/20 09:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So I can help a little here. I had 2-6v GC batteries and 300w of solar for four years prior to my last upgrade to 4-6v GC batteries and 450w of solar. Assuming your 300w of solar is a poorly designed(yes I did say that)setup that has the controller somewhere in the living space of the coach and the batteries are solid, the only difference between what we do is the TV and Video stuff your kids are doing. I'd start by a Mr. Heater Buddy or Big Buddy to heat up the coach prior nigh, night(meme's), then turn it off. Then set your thermostat down to 55 degrees and blanket up. And as everyone has said, the furnace is the big draw, like 7-8 amps. The less it works the better you are. The Buddy will heat the coach up PDQ in the A.M. And usually you'll have the stove on making coffee that will heat up the coach too. Is the best way to know all this stuff to track it with an actual audit and a battery monitor....yes. Have I gotten that far? No. Will I? Yes, some day. Right now, trial and error, reading forums, then applying this knowledge to upgrading my solar and battery bank has made a huge difference in my boondocking comfort. We went to the Mojave desert and spent a week in the snow and the night temps were in the mid twenty's. Days were like 36 degrees. Holds up perfectly now with no generator. I would really do some reading about what a solid Solar System would look like and start there. The controller in the pass thru as close to the battery as possible is prolly the single most profitable thing you can do for your system.


V-465
2013 GMC 2500HD Duramax Denali. 2015 CreekSide 20fq w/450 watts solar and 465 amp/hour of batteries. Retiring in 2021, then look-out road, here we come!

allen8106

Burrton. KS

Senior Member

Joined: 01/31/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 04/13/20 10:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You need to install a battery monitor. That will tell you how much power you are using. Battery monitor should always be the first device you install long before any other equipment.


2010 Eagle Super Lite 315RLDS
2018 GMC Sierra 3500HD 6.6L Duramax

2010 Nights 45
2011 Nights 70
2012 Nights 144
2013 Nights 46
2014 Nights 49
2015 Nights 57
2016 Nights 73
2017 Nights 40
2018 Nights 56
2019 Nights 76
2020 Nights 36


opnspaces

San Diego Ca

Senior Member

Joined: 12/22/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/14/20 11:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While nobody can adequately answer your question with the information provided, you should be able to.

When the sun goes down are your batteries at 12.7 volts or higher? If yes then you have enough solar.

In the morning are your batteries at or above 12.1 volts? If yes then you have enough batteries.


2001 Suburban 4x4. 6.0L, 4.10 3/4 ton
2005 Jayco Jay Flight 27BH
1986 Coleman Columbia Popup.

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 04/15/20 03:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

opnspaces wrote:

In the morning are your batteries at or above 12.1 volts? If yes then you have enough batteries.
And you have used about 90 to 120 amp hours or about half the capacity.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

Twistedlarch

Cottage Grove, OR.

New Member

Joined: 06/25/2019

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 04/17/20 10:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Vintage465 wrote:

So I can help a little here. I had 2-6v GC batteries and 300w of solar for four years prior to my last upgrade to 4-6v GC batteries and 450w of solar. Assuming your 300w of solar is a poorly designed(yes I did say that)setup that has the controller somewhere in the living space of the coach and the batteries are solid, the only difference between what we do is the TV and Video stuff your kids are doing. I'd start by a Mr. Heater Buddy or Big Buddy to heat up the coach prior nigh, night(meme's), then turn it off. Then set your thermostat down to 55 degrees and blanket up. And as everyone has said, the furnace is the big draw, like 7-8 amps. The less it works the better you are. The Buddy will heat the coach up PDQ in the A.M. And usually you'll have the stove on making coffee that will heat up the coach too. Is the best way to know all this stuff to track it with an actual audit and a battery monitor....yes. Have I gotten that far? No. Will I? Yes, some day. Right now, trial and error, reading forums, then applying this knowledge to upgrading my solar and battery bank has made a huge difference in my boondocking comfort. We went to the Mojave desert and spent a week in the snow and the night temps were in the mid twenty's. Days were like 36 degrees. Holds up perfectly now with no generator. I would really do some reading about what a solid Solar System would look like and start there. The controller in the pass thru as close to the battery as possible is prolly the single most profitable thing you can do for your system.



My controller is in the pass through storage, only because it's been my temporary spot while I figure out how to wire it into the coach. Where it's at now sounds like the best spot for it.

Thanks!

Twistedlarch

Cottage Grove, OR.

New Member

Joined: 06/25/2019

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 04/18/20 09:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hey all, last night I disconnected the shore power from the trailer and let it sit idle for 12 hrs. My voltage started at 13.7 and ended at 12.4. The only things running were the Carbon monoxide detector, stereo (off position), and the fridge which was running on LP.

The batteries I'm running are the 6 volt Interstate GC2 Deep Cycle Extreme (GC2-ECL-UTL) 225 Amp hours 115 min @ 75 Amps.

Brian

CA Traveler

The Western States

Senior Member

Joined: 01/03/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/18/20 09:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Twistedlarch wrote:

Hey all, last night I disconnected the shore power from the trailer and let it sit idle for 12 hrs. My voltage started at 13.7 and ended at 12.4. The only things running were the Carbon monoxide detector, stereo (off position), and the fridge which was running on LP.

The batteries I'm running are the 6 volt Interstate GC2 Deep Cycle Extreme (GC2-ECL-UTL) 225 Amp hours 115 min @ 75 Amps.

Brian
That suggests 80% SOC, 44Ah draw or 3.7A/hour. An ammeter could confirm in addition to a battery load check for weak batteries.


2009 Holiday Rambler 42' Scepter with ISL 400 Cummins
750 Watts Solar Morningstar MPPT 60 Controller
2014 Grand Cherokee Overland

Bob


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Amp hours
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.