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fj12ryder

Platte City, MO

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Posted: 04/23/20 12:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Hers is a simple example of how to determine how much weight you will add to your front axle depending on pin placement VS center of rear axle.

My truck has a 170" wheelbase, if i move my hitch 4" forward that will mean I will transfer .0235% of my 6k pin weight or 141#. This does jive with my loaded and unloaded front axle weights.
I think you mean 2.35%. .0235% of 6000 lbs. would be 1.41 lbs. [emoticon]

I'm not really sure it would work that way, 4 inches is 2.35% of your wheelbase, but not sure that weight transfer would be that linear. But I dunno.


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 04/23/20 12:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ford truck guy wrote:

Ron,

With my WB being 176"... and my pin being 3640#... When I move my mounts, I will only move 86# to the front axle??

I think I would rather leave it and keep the extra clearance between the tailgate down and the fiver ?? Thats 1" ~ VS ~ 3" ahead....


I see no issue doing so. I give you my BLESSING. [emoticon]


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 04/23/20 12:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Hers is a simple example of how to determine how much weight you will add to your front axle depending on pin placement VS center of rear axle.

My truck has a 170" wheelbase, if i move my hitch 4" forward that will mean I will transfer .0235% of my 6k pin weight or 141#. This does jive with my loaded and unloaded front axle weights.
I think you mean 2.35%. .0235% of 6000 lbs. would be 1.41 lbs. [emoticon]

I'm not really sure it would work that way, 4 inches is 2.35% of your wheelbase, but not sure that weight transfer would be that linear. But I dunno.


Picky, Picky! [emoticon]

4 divided by 170 is .0235%, or .0235 x 170 is 4. Take 6000x.0235 = 141.

Sure does work and I do believe my math is correct.

ford truck guy

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Posted: 04/23/20 01:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

fj12ryder wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Hers is a simple example of how to determine how much weight you will add to your front axle depending on pin placement VS center of rear axle.

My truck has a 170" wheelbase, if i move my hitch 4" forward that will mean I will transfer .0235% of my 6k pin weight or 141#. This does jive with my loaded and unloaded front axle weights.
I think you mean 2.35%. .0235% of 6000 lbs. would be 1.41 lbs. [emoticon]

I'm not really sure it would work that way, 4 inches is 2.35% of your wheelbase, but not sure that weight transfer would be that linear. But I dunno.


Picky, Picky! [emoticon]

4 divided by 170 is .0235%, or .0235 x 170 is 4. Take 6000x.0235 = 141.

Sure does work and I do believe my math is correct.


2.35% of 6000# is in fact 141... converting 2.35% to decimal form takes it to .0235...

Your both right


Me-Her-the kids
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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 04/23/20 01:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ford truck guy wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

fj12ryder wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Hers is a simple example of how to determine how much weight you will add to your front axle depending on pin placement VS center of rear axle.

My truck has a 170" wheelbase, if i move my hitch 4" forward that will mean I will transfer .0235% of my 6k pin weight or 141#. This does jive with my loaded and unloaded front axle weights.
I think you mean 2.35%. .0235% of 6000 lbs. would be 1.41 lbs. [emoticon]

I'm not really sure it would work that way, 4 inches is 2.35% of your wheelbase, but not sure that weight transfer would be that linear. But I dunno.


Picky, Picky! [emoticon]

4 divided by 170 is .0235%, or .0235 x 170 is 4. Take 6000x.0235 = 141.

Sure does work and I do believe my math is correct.


2.35% of 6000# is in fact 141... converting 2.35% to decimal form takes it to .0235...

Your both right


It can't be ETHYL!!!

Thanks, I used my "BASIC" calculator.

valhalla360

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Posted: 04/24/20 09:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:



Picky, Picky! [emoticon]

4 divided by 170 is .0235%, or .0235 x 170 is 4. Take 6000x.0235 = 141.

Sure does work and I do believe my math is correct.


Your answer is correct but the work you showed to get there is incorrect.

.0235% =/= .0235

.0235% = .000235

When used as an example, it matters because some people will follow your work and get the wrong answer.


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 04/24/20 09:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4 divided by 170 is .0235, or .0235 x 170 is 4. Take 6000x.0235 = 141.

Better?

Put numbers in a calculator that's how it looks. NOT a math guru but this sure looks fine to me.

Anyway thanks for confirming my answer is correct.

valhalla360

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Posted: 04/25/20 05:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

4 divided by 170 is .0235, or .0235 x 170 is 4. Take 6000x.0235 = 141.

Better?

Put numbers in a calculator that's how it looks. NOT a math guru but this sure looks fine to me.

Anyway thanks for confirming my answer is correct.


Yep.

Lots of modern calculators allow you to include the "%" and then the calculator makes the adjustment automatically, so if you make the conversion from percentage in your head and then include the %...it winds up doing it twice and you are off by a factor of 100.

Hedgehog

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Posted: 04/27/20 03:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just went through this with my new truck, 2019 f450. I started with the b&w hitch in the 3” forward position. After doing my measurements to adjust the height of the hitch, I ended up changing the position to 1” forward to gain a little more wiggle room between the tailgate and front of the Rv. I didn’t feel a difference in towing stability but for the he’ll of it, I called b&w. They informed me that it is a negligible difference between the two.

Cummins12V98

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Posted: 04/27/20 08:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree not a big difference. If you can it’s better to be full forward.

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