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mikeratz

Alberta

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Joined: 05/03/2020

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Posted: 05/03/20 09:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I appreciate all the feeback!
So as originally thought, it sounds like I should spring for a new WDH.

From the reviews I looked at I like the Equalizer. It's also a lower profile and my trailer is fairly low (the Reece dual cam does hang down a bit. Had one a few trailers ago)

Should I go with the 1200#?? 1400# would allow more weight options but would it give up ride quality when running less load?

Also according to the Equalizer website you only add behind the axle cargo weight? (I've always used all passengers and truck cargo)

Thanks for putting up with all my questions...[emoticon]

jerem0621

Tennessee

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Posted: 05/03/20 10:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mikeratz wrote:

I appreciate all the feeback!
So as originally thought, it sounds like I should spring for a new WDH.

From the reviews I looked at I like the Equalizer. It's also a lower profile and my trailer is fairly low (the Reece dual cam does hang down a bit. Had one a few trailers ago)

Should I go with the 1200#?? 1400# would allow more weight options but would it give up ride quality when running less load?

Also according to the Equalizer website you only add behind the axle cargo weight? (I've always used all passengers and truck cargo)

Thanks for putting up with all my questions...[emoticon]


No worries at all, this is a helpful group of people.

I suggest making a trailer tongue scale (bathroom scale method) and use it for EVERY POSSIBLE SITUATION.

I weighed my TW with the trailer nearly empty, I weighed it will full grey water tanks (behind the axles on my trailer) ... and then I did a worst case scenario. I added full fresh water (50 gallons in front of the axles) with empty gray and black tanks WITH NOTHING loaded behind the axles.

I also had the hitch head latched into the coupler and hanging with the entire hitch on the tongue for accurate weights.

Yes you also count cargo weight behind the TV axle. I just make it a rule that nothing goes behind the TV axles. Load the camper and not the TV.

Also, if you weigh your tongue weight under the jack like I did you need to multiply that number by .95 to get a close approximation to what the weight is at the coupler.

I did my math and took a screen shot on my phone and scribbled some reference notes on it.

Here are some crude pics and screen shots I took when weighing. Yea I know it should be on concrete but I don’t have any and I’ve done this for years and double checked via a cat scale that this works pretty good.

[image]

[image]

[image]

Thanks, and JMHO

Jeremiah


TV- 2011 Chevy Tahoe, 2WD, Hayden transmission cooler
TT - Zinger 270BH
WD Hitch- HaulMaster 1,000 lb Round Bar
Dual Friction bar sway control
Tekonsha Voyager brake controller (Great Brake Controller)

It’s Kind of Fun to do the Impossible
~Walt Disney~


GrandpaKip

Flat Rock

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Posted: 05/04/20 07:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sounds like that is too much for the Andersen. Most of the recommendations I’ve seen are for a max tongue weight of 800# or so.


Kip
2015 Skyline Dart 214RB
2018 Silverado Double Cab 4x4
Andersen Hitch

ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 05/04/20 08:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Weight distribution hitch and a sway bar.
Go back to stock rake.

camp-n-family

London, Ontario

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Posted: 05/04/20 08:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

By your calculations your Andersen hitch isn’t transferring enough weight which is a known problem with tongue weights over 600lbs. An Equil-I-zer hitch with 1200lbs bars would likely solve a lot of your problems.


'17 Ram 2500 Crewcab Laramie CTD
'13 Keystone Bullet Premier 310BHPR
Hitched by Hensley


mordecai81

United States

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Posted: 05/04/20 10:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I used an Andersen with our former TT with a 600lb tongue weight and it worked great. Our new TT has an 1100lb TW and the Andersen couldn't transfer enough weight so got an Equalizer with 1200lb bars and it is perfect, both for sway and weight transfer. I would guess 1200lb bars would be what you need.

TomG2

Central Illinois

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Posted: 05/05/20 07:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Borrow or rent a F-250 to find out how enjoyable towing can be. Much more stable platform, even for a 6,500 pound trailer. Or, keep changing hitches, tires, suspension, etc. until you find something workable.

OleManOleCan

Alabama

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Posted: 05/07/20 12:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not To Simple answer... More truck... Tow with a F-250 or Chevy 2500 and you will see a difference. I tried my camper behind an F-250, I eventually traded for one.

My Solution... Buy something like an Equalizer with 1200# bars.
Install it yourself. Plenty of videos to teach you how.
Add a sway bar... Lots of problems will disappear.
When you tow, load up your tires to 60-65 lbs. A stiffer tire helps.

Can't do squat about the wind. It will push your wind catcher around.
I got in a strong cross wind situation coming home from the Smoky Mts. I was on I-24. My solution was to get off the Interstate and drive 2 lane black top, back to Alabama. There are enough trees and buildings to serve as kind of a wind break. The guys are right that tell you the set up is wrong, and you have too much weight on the hitch.
BTW: An F-150 HD with an Equalizer will tow that trailer just fine if it is set up correctly.

Slowmover

Fort Worth, TX

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Posted: 05/09/20 11:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

An Andersen shouldn’t ever be considered if a WDH is needed. It isn’t one.

Of the obsolete hitch types (non-Hensley patent) the original WDH is still the best. The Reese Dual Cam. (An Equalizer IS NOT in its class).

The DC takes more time to first set up — and benefits again by adjustment from significant weight changes to vehicles — that “sensitivity” pays.

A 4WD pickup with a lift kit describes the worst possible tow vehicle.

In the same way, a TALL conventional travel trailer (slides) on leaf springs — a box without aero design — is the worst of its type.

The combination isn’t worth owning, IMO. Not if one really wants to travel.

The pickup when loaded for camping and with passengers SHOULD BE close to 50/50 in weight distribution BEFORE hitching. (Cat Scale proof).

The purpose of WD is to re-distribute TW approximately 1/3-13-1/3: Steer, Drive, Tandem. Ideally it shows the solo truck Steer value and Hitched (tensioned) Steer value as the same. The Drive ought to then be 10% greater than Steer when finished.

Tires are inflated to the load value pressure. No higher. TT tires to sidewall max.

Better than stock shock absorbers a requirement. Even a brand new truck.
The trailer needs them also, but changing to Dexter Torflex axles the best way forward.

The pickup bed WILL move against the suspension. A Panhard Rod is a GREAT addition. And/Or upsizing anti-roll bar size one step, front and rear.

Braking tests are mandatory. Properly hitched, the combined rig should stop FASTER than the loaded TV, solo.

Contributor Ron Gratz posted a Three Pass Scale Method back in 2010. That’s the minimum. The start. THERE IS A RANGE OF ADJUSTMENT FOR A GIVEN COMBINED RIG. Need to know both ends of it.

.


1990 35' SILVER STREAK Sterling, 9k GVWR
2004 DODGE RAM 2WD 305/555 ISB, QC SRW LB NV-5600, 9k GVWR
Hensley Arrow; 11-cpm solo, 17-cpm towing fuel cost

Slowmover

Fort Worth, TX

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Posted: 05/09/20 12:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Work on getting the truck “right”. Mine — at 8,940-lbs solo with driver and ready to hitch for any trip — is within 40-lbs at each corner.

1). The gear in the bed MUST BE ahead of the rear axle. Barely on it if at all.

No matter how many changes you must undertake to do this, do it.

I had to spend days by myself to get things organized in this way. 1,200-lbs of gear.

2). THEN the gear MUST be secured against movement. If the truck rolled on its side, it would still be in place. Contacting the bed.

3). The empty box is a penalty to overcome. Flawed design for a road vehicle. A compromise so a contractor or farmer/rancher can carry needed gear or supply. A truly lousy choice for anyone else. Who is without corresponding IRS miles.

4). A pickup will roll over in an accident where a car or SUV just spins around. Rollovers account for a quarter of all fatalities, and an even higher percentage of dead serious injury. They are a low speed farm vehicle.

5). Lousy highway dynamics which are worsened by hitching a wind-catching trailer.

6). The dumb guys believe “weight” to be a problem. It isn’t. WDH solves it over 50-years ago. A 1k TW is the province of cars and minivans. A nothingburger.

The problems in towing are the same as when solo. The order of importance for stable control is:

1). Steering control
2). Braking
3). Throttle.


Crosswinds are what cause loss-of-control accidents. Natural, or man-made.

If my 63’ rig can go down the highway in winds that park 5’ers and tractor-trailers — with fingertip steering — the EQUAL IMPORTANCE of

Tow Vehicle design
Hitch Rigging
Trailer design

cannot be overstated.

Those three are EQUAL. The hitch (and it’s actions) is about STEERING.
About minimal BRAKING distance. About EFFECTIVE throttle use.

These are each about DEGREE of input, and DURATION of same.

Details matter. Some take effort.

Test. Verify. Confirm.

Start with the pickup. Stock suspension and highway tires matter.

Clue #2 about who are the dumb guys: bought a bigger truck that climbs the ascent faster. But his trailer is still on leaf and with drum brakes. A cheap hitch (as he willfully “fails” to understand the importance), and an even cheaper brake controller.

There’s no situation MORE dangerous than a mountain descent. A crosswind gust. The source may be a straight truck blazing past or Mother Nature. What acceleration distance do you need to simultaneously floor the throttle and slam home the brake controller?

How fast up the hill? (Dunce caps on sale in quantity).

All the details come together here. The worse the pickup flaws, the less likelihood there will be time to act. A billboard trailer on leafs will have all tires in the air before the 1-T 4-WD driver notices.

The hitch is a STEERING component.

Make its working conditions best



.

* This post was edited 05/09/20 12:32pm by Slowmover *

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