Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Truck Campers: F250 Payload Capacity
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YellowLightning

Down da Bayou

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Posted: 06/02/20 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mbloof wrote:

YellowLightning wrote:

Essentially adding the 18" tires and wheels should allow the truck to handle a Rear GAWR of 7000lbs and give the truck an 11000 GVWR.

Thoughts on my thoughts? haha


Fords SD rear axle is rated for 9,750 lbs so your rear axle weight rating comes down to the ratings of the installed tires at 80PSI times two. (the weakest link)

My stock OEM tires on my 2017 F250 were rated at 3450LBS each giving me a rear axle weight rating of 6900.

Needless to say, the stock tires and rims were replaced with less than 500 miles on them for higher rated parts. [emoticon]


- Mark0.


Yes I think that's what I was finding out. Factory tires being the weak link. I believe I will buy the F350 I found and change out the tires. "Should" be good for close to 4020lbs payload, with the proper tires.

adamis

Northern California

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Posted: 06/02/20 05:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grab the popcorn indeed. These discussions are great when they come up every couple of months. Nothing seems to get a good lively discussion going more than weight capacity of a truck. To YellowLighting... There are lots of good opinions on both sides of the argument here. Do your research and go with what you feel comfortable with in the end.

My own two cents... Yup, you could get an SRW and worry about the weight police, tire ratings, axle ratings, whether you can afford to bring that extra piece of equipment, telling the Mrs to leave the kitchen sink or the ironing board behind (not kidding, actually had a family friend who's wife packed a full size ironing board for a trip they were taking in a station wagon). Or, get a dually and don't stress about the rest.

I would venture to guess that many of the people who have an SRW probably bought the truck long before they thought about buying a camper. Keeping the truck made financial or emotional sense and as BigFootFord has proven, with the right upgrades you can go hundreds of thousands of miles worry free.

On the otherhand... If you are still in the market for a truck and if you really intend to put a LOT of miles on it with the camper then skip the SRW and go for the dually. About the only two negatives I can think of for a dually are the higher operating cost (2 extra tires) and the higher upfront cost. What you get in return is a truck designed specifically to carry your expected payload without a lot of upgrades and peace of mind having an extra tire in case of a rear blowout. When it comes to registration fees, register it as an RV (if allowed) if you intend to keep the camper on full time (or remove it but don't have a need to carry payload) and that will knock a lot off your fees.


1999 F350 Dually with 7.3 Diesel
2000 Bigfoot 10.6 Camper


YellowLightning

Down da Bayou

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Posted: 06/02/20 05:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

adamis wrote:

Grab the popcorn indeed. These discussions are great when they come up every couple of months. Nothing seems to get a good lively discussion going more than weight capacity of a truck. To YellowLighting... There are lots of good opinions on both sides of the argument here. Do your research and go with what you feel comfortable with in the end.

My own two cents... Yup, you could get an SRW and worry about the weight police, tire ratings, axle ratings, whether you can afford to bring that extra piece of equipment, telling the Mrs to leave the kitchen sink or the ironing board behind (not kidding, actually had a family friend who's wife packed a full size ironing board for a trip they were taking in a station wagon). Or, get a dually and don't stress about the rest.

I would venture to guess that many of the people who have an SRW probably bought the truck long before they thought about buying a camper. Keeping the truck made financial or emotional sense and as BigFootFord has proven, with the right upgrades you can go hundreds of thousands of miles worry free.

On the otherhand... If you are still in the market for a truck and if you really intend to put a LOT of miles on it with the camper then skip the SRW and go for the dually. About the only two negatives I can think of for a dually are the higher operating cost (2 extra tires) and the higher upfront cost. What you get in return is a truck designed specifically to carry your expected payload without a lot of upgrades and peace of mind having an extra tire in case of a rear blowout. When it comes to registration fees, register it as an RV (if allowed) if you intend to keep the camper on full time (or remove it but don't have a need to carry payload) and that will knock a lot off your fees.


Thank you for your insight. After extensive research, I feel I have a better understanding on Ford's configurations and why they rate their trucks like they do. It's essentially just spring rate and tire capacity. I'm not concerned about registration fees. I am concerned about whether the truck could handle the camper we want and about the stated payload capacity, in the instance of a legal run in if the vehicle could be proven to have been overweight.

The recent F350 I found with a 3720lbs capacity will work just fine for everything I am concerned about.

I appreciate everyone's response. It was all very helpful.

Kayteg1

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Posted: 06/02/20 05:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Beats me why pointing that taxable ratings have very loose connection with carrying TC never made it to section stickies.
Bottom line, the rear axle on my dually has about 7000 lb "payload" capacity, while front another 2000lb.
Long way from door sticker.





JD5150

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Posted: 06/02/20 05:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I could be wrong but I think my 2017 SRW F350 has a bigger rear axle tube than the 2017 SRW F250.

I have the gas 6.2, crew cab, long bed with max payload 4160

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 06/02/20 06:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Had a big long informative response that rv.net choked on.
So simply, OP, you still don't understand much of what you speak after your considerable research and there still aren't many if any material differences between the trucks your considering based on their real world design, construction and capability.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

JIMNLIN

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Posted: 06/02/20 07:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Yes I think that's what I was finding out. Factory tires being the weak link. I believe I will buy the F350 I found and change out the tires. "Should" be good for close to 4020lbs payload, with the proper tires.

Looking at Fleet Ford specs shows the weak link is 3590 lb capacity for their OEM 18" and 20" wheels.

For years tires were the weak link with 16"/17" tire capacity. Truck mfg turned to 18" and 20" tires, when GAWRs started up, that may have 3750-4000 lb ratings so their no longer the weak link in a OEM suspension.

Taxable weights ?
Means nothing in a state like my state... Oklahoma. We have no weights of any kind to register our non commercial vehicles. A GVWR or GVW on a out of state vehicle registration simply isn't used.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

'03 2500 QC Dodge/Cummins HO 3.73 6 speed manual Jacobs Westach
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JIMNLIN

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Posted: 06/02/20 08:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JD5150 wrote:

I could be wrong but I think my 2017 SRW F350 has a bigger rear axle tube than the 2017 SRW F250.

I have the gas 6.2, crew cab, long bed with max payload 4160

Yeah the gas F250 gets a smaller axle dia vs the F250 diesel. It gets the same axle as F350 srw. Axles don't carry weight...just twist the gears/axles.

That 4160 lb payload is a gvwr based payload and will have to be spread over FAWR/RAWR. The F250 gas or diesel simply doesn't have enough RAWR to carry 4160 lbs in the bed.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 06/02/20 10:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

JD5150 wrote:

I could be wrong but I think my 2017 SRW F350 has a bigger rear axle tube than the 2017 SRW F250.

I have the gas 6.2, crew cab, long bed with max payload 4160

Yeah the gas F250 gets a smaller axle dia vs the F250 diesel. It gets the same axle as F350 srw. Axles don't carry weight...just twist the gears/axles.

That 4160 lb payload is a gvwr based payload and will have to be spread over FAWR/RAWR. The F250 gas or diesel simply doesn't have enough RAWR to carry 4160 lbs in the bed.

OMG. You actually contradicted yourself in the same response.

Axles DO carry weight, as a unit. If they didn't, the axle weight rating wouldn't matter and you could put a little 8.8 axle under a F250 gasser because it's not going to twist it apart.

RAWR = REAR AXLE WEIGHT RATING. Not RATR (rear axle toruqe rating)...

JD5150

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Posted: 06/03/20 09:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

JD5150 wrote:

I could be wrong but I think my 2017 SRW F350 has a bigger rear axle tube than the 2017 SRW F250.

I have the gas 6.2, crew cab, long bed with max payload 4160

Yeah the gas F250 gets a smaller axle dia vs the F250 diesel. It gets the same axle as F350 srw. Axles don't carry weight...just twist the gears/axles.

That 4160 lb payload is a gvwr based payload and will have to be spread over FAWR/RAWR. The F250 gas or diesel simply doesn't have enough RAWR to carry 4160 lbs in the bed.

So I'm guessing bigger stronger axles will benefit me for off road and turning 35 inch tires. I don't plan on doing anything extreme.

My plan is installing 35 inch tires and a aluminum flatbed with a flatbed pop up TC. I can get 35 inch tires under it without a lift or a leveling kit. Stock tires on it now are really close to 33's. I also have the snow plow package which sits the front end a little higher than an F350 without it. I will eventually install a heavy duty front bumper with a winch since my front end can handle it

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