Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: inverter to AC outlet!!
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > inverter to AC outlet!!

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Powts

Vancouver

New Member

Joined: 01/10/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/12/20 10:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So I just purchased a GoPower 700W pure sine wave inverter plus all the install goodies for our TT. The install looks like a piece of cake BUT my wife would like to have 2 outlets in the trailer that run off the inverter to charge phones, laptops, and run the TV. The inverter has 2 gfci plugs but she wants 2 outlets IN the trailer wired up. Can someone, anyone, show me how to do this?! I have no idea what I need to do. Judging by what I've ordered, I've got enough cable to run the lines from the battery banks to a 200 amp fuse to the inverter. I've also ordered a remote for the inverter but that's more of a phone line type wire. How do I charge up 2 outlets in the trailer from the inverter?? I'm lost!!

carringb

Corvallis, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 07/28/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/12/20 11:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Easiest way is keep the inverter close to the batteries (otherwise you’ll need larger cables). Then install new receptacles wired using an extension cord with the female end cut off. Then plug the male end into the inverter. This will avoid any need for transfer a transfer switch or relay.

The TV is likely already a 12-volt unit. If it is, you can simply remove the transformer power supply and hardwire in the 12-volt lead. This will avoid the loses of stepping up then back down, and modified sine inverter can create noise in A/V equipment.


Bryan

2000 Ford E450 V10 VAN! 450,000+ miles
2014 ORV really big trailer
2015 Ford Focus ST


pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/18/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/13/20 01:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Decide where you want the inverter powered outlets to be. Install a female plug. Run wire to the inverter.

plug-->wire-->inverter-->fuse(near battery bank)-->battery bank


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 06/13/20 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you want to power the existing outlets you will need a small transfer switch.

https://www.donrowe.com/KISAE-TS15A-Automatic-Transfer-Switch $50

Switch is easy. Remove the romex of your choice of branch circuit from the breaker panel and connect to the switch OUTPUT. New piece of romex and reconnect to the breaker panel and connect to the INPUT. Plug the switch into the inverter and you are good to go.

If the fridge is on the circuit you choose you will need to set it to propane only or it will run down your battery very fast.

Inverter close to the battery is best but then you are pulling wire as needed. For just small loads you might be able to mount the inverter behind the breaker panel and supply 12v withe the main battery charging wire. This would put all connections near the breaker panel and just make the connections. No pulling wire through the floor or walls.

* This post was edited 06/13/20 09:22am by time2roll *


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

carringb

Corvallis, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 07/28/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/13/20 09:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Also, for charging devices using USB, using 12V adapters is more efficient than using an inverter to power 120v power adapters.

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/13/20 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

transfer switch is IMHO one of the better if not the best solution. In fact if you have the (in)famous WFCO charger system, there is a transfer switch made to attach to the back of it. then put a subpanel next to the switch for the outlets to run off shore and transfer power. Did that in my trailer and have it set so that only the microwave, and the outlets run off the transfer switch. That way can't accidentally try to run the fridge, charger, AC etc. off the battery bank inverter. Inverter is in the pass through close to the batteries and a remote power switch for the inverter is in the trailer for easy access to power on/off.

I did need to run power cable from the inverter up to the power panel in the trailer to the transfer switch.


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!


pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/18/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/13/20 11:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A transfer switch will work. But consider using it with a sub panel so that the fridge, water heater, and converter are not going to be powered. I think that I'd want a larger inverter than 700 watts if I went with the sub panel and transfer switch.

The "work around" is to manually switch these items. If the batteries are hungry and the converter is left on, the fuse for the inverter will blow. Similarly for the water heater.

That is why I prefer the idea of dedicated outlets when the choice is a small wattage inverter.

I deliberately added a dedicated inverter outlet in the kitchen area. As I have a large inverter, it gives me extra power when on shore power and means I can tun the induction cooker, and another high wattage device.

With just the 700 watts, my coffee maker could be run.

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/14/20 10:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

A transfer switch will work. But consider using it with a sub panel so that the fridge, water heater, and converter are not going to be powered. I think that I'd want a larger inverter than 700 watts if I went with the sub panel and transfer switch.

The "work around" is to manually switch these items. If the batteries are hungry and the converter is left on, the fuse for the inverter will blow. Similarly for the water heater.

That is why I prefer the idea of dedicated outlets when the choice is a small wattage inverter.

I deliberately added a dedicated inverter outlet in the kitchen area. As I have a large inverter, it gives me extra power when on shore power and means I can tun the induction cooker, and another high wattage device.

With just the 700 watts, my coffee maker could be run.


we are on the same page. I'd rather rely on my sub panel to control what is powered than my absent minded brain.! In my case the microwave and two 120V outlet circuits are on the subpanel from the inverter, keeps me from trying to run AC, have the fridge on AC accidentally, HWH etc. etc.

Carvhors

Ohio

New Member

Joined: 09/14/2018

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/17/20 10:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's what I've done with success:

Turn off the breakers to the converter, microwave, and AC.

Install the 30amp-to-110 dogbone to the umbilical line and plug that into one of the outlets on the inverter.

This will provide 110 power to all of the outlets in the rig. I turn off the AC and microwave breakers just so they aren't accidently turned on when on battery power. The converter also needs to be turned off because you don't want to be using battery power to backfeed into into your battery(ies). Basically, you don't want to use your battery to charge your battery. Not a good thing.

I've done numerous times with zero issues. It's basically the same as running separate outlets that plug directly into the inverter. You still need to be aware of the amperage usage of whatever your plugging into the outlets so as to not drain your battery bank.

Kayteg1

California > Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 06/18/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/17/20 01:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The cheapest way is just run extension cord to the place where you want the power.
Next step would be running hardwire from inverter plug into additional wall duplex. New era duplex come with USB outlets as option, what solves several issues.
You mark the duplex "inverter" and all you have to do is remember that when you plug shore power.
The best is transfer switch, with converter rewired to shore power connectors.
Similar best option is buying converter/charger with transfer switch built in. That also will give you better converter, than TC manufacturers put into those units.





Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > inverter to AC outlet!!
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.