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aftermath

Washington State

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Posted: 07/02/20 10:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

With a hitch with built in sway control, the set up is a huge part of your safety. Riding "level" is indeed a goal but consider this. You can raise you ball high enough to get it to ride level without putting any friction on your bars. I have an Equalizer hitch and they have some specific steps to follow. Mine is level but, that requires some pressure through the bars. If I had to add more pressure from the bars, then there would be other issues. Read the directions for your hitch and follow them for the initial set up. Call the manufacturer for more specific info.


2017 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab, 5.7L V8
2006 Airstream 25 FB SE
Equalizer Hitch

Hannibal

Tampa Bay Area

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Posted: 07/03/20 06:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Does this sway happen when no other traffic is around and no wind? Tread squirm and light suspension can cause your rig to waller around in your lane. If it only happens when other traffic is passing or mild crosswinds, but then straightens out, it’s likely normal reaction with a lightweight truck. I tow our 32.5’ TT with no sway control with our F250. Tows like a champ but we occasionally feel passing trucks. Box trucks are the worst as bow wave pushes while vacuum pulls the rear as they pass. Nothing scary but it’ll keep you awake. If you’re having sway as in oscillation above 45mph with no wind or traffic around, then I’d say tongue weight or too much hanging from the rear of the trailer. Some trailers tow better than others as well. Short wheelbase trailers are worse. Too much WD Trying to compensate for not enough truck can induce some steering disturbances as well. Been there too many years ago.


2020 F250 STX CC SB 7.3L 10spd 3.55 4x4
2010 F250 XLT CC SB 5.4L 5spdTS 3.73
ex '95 Cummins,'98 12v Cummins,'01.5 Cummins,'03 Cummins; '05 Hemi
2017 Jayco 28RLS TT 32.5'. Reese HP Trunnion 800

Boomerweps

Hills of PA

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Posted: 07/03/20 08:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It appears you have a TV and WDH that can handle your TT.
Go over the set up procedure for your WDH. It seems something may be off there.
I am one who recommends pumping up your TT and TV tires to their maximum sidewall pressure when towing to prevent any tire squirming. Makes a big difference with P tires.


2019 Wolf Pup 16 BHS Limited, axle flipped
2019 F150 4x4 SCrew SB STX 5.0 3.55 factory tow package, 7000#GVWR, 1990 CC Tow mirrors, TBC


Mike134

Elgin

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Posted: 07/03/20 09:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree about max pressure with P tires


2019 F150 4X4 1903 payload
2018 Adventurer 21RBS 7700 GVWR.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 07/03/20 10:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP, be more specific. The fact that you mention it’s your “first trailer” and that it’s a good size trailer for a half ton, it could just be that your expectations aren’t in line with what it feels like to tow a trailer, or it could need some fine tuning.
Could be trailer is a bit light on the tongue and/or a lot of weight aft of the axles causing it to wag the dog a bit. Could be soft tires on the truck, could be not enough weight transfer and steering is light.....
Some expect a trailer to tow like it’s “not there.” Maybe a minor issue or 2 maybe nothing.
Some will say it’s too much trailer for the truck. I can tell you definitively, while it may be too much for some people, it is absolutely NOT too long or heavy for a new half ton. Not in the least. Difference in opinion, I know, but after 30 years of towing probably 100s or different trailers with dozens of different trucks of all sizes, it’s fine.
Some specifics could help dial it in or confirm its just normal behavior.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

afidel

Cleveland

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Posted: 07/03/20 11:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

He has E rated tires, they certainly aren't passenger tires!


2017 KZ Sportsmen Classic 181BH
2015 GMC 1500 Sierra 4x4 5.3 3.42 long bed
E2 WDH


Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 07/03/20 01:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

He has E rated tires, they certainly aren't passenger tires!


And E rating is not "stock" for that truck.

If OP is following inflation chart on the truck door post and is running LT tires rated for E loads, that chart is invalid as it will give them too low of a pressure.

That truck was equipped with PASSENGER tires and as such will have typical passenger tire pressures.

The tires in E rating will require MORE pressure than P tires to get the same weight rating or higher than P tires.

E rating tires to get max rated capacity are rated at 80 PSI, Passenger tires typically will max out at 35-36 PSI..

35 PSI in LT E rated tires would be considered as having a flat tire..

Too little air pressure in those E rated tires can easily give you an odd feeling of being pushed around..

OP should have gone with LT tires with C rating which would have given them some extra weight capacity over stock P tires and would be a much better match to the vehicle.

E capacity is too much overkill and potentially part of the problem they are having. And yes, you CAN have overkill on tires.

afidel

Cleveland

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Posted: 07/03/20 01:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Who follows the door sticker for tire inflation, especially for non-OEM tires? I put in the max cold PSI indicated on the sidewall.

BarabooBob

Baraboo, WI

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Posted: 07/03/20 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Someone that does not know about increasing the tire pressure for E capacity tires may look at the door sticker. Gdetrailer was just being helpful. I also run near max pressure for my LT tire on my F150. I checked the manufacturer's site and run the psi that is suggested for my wight.


Bob & Dawn Married 32 years
2017 Viking 17RD
2011 Ford F150 3.5L Ecoboost 420 lb/ft
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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 07/03/20 09:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

Who follows the door sticker for tire inflation, especially for non-OEM tires? I put in the max cold PSI indicated on the sidewall.


OP HAS "E" load rated tires.

What do you not understand about that?

E load rated tires have a side wall pressure of 80 PSI which is most likely well above the rim pressure rating.

Those tires have a load rating well over 3000 lbs at the sidewall pressure of 80 PSI.

Those tires BELONG on a F250/350, not on a F150.

That combo is not going to work well at full sidewall pressure and most likely will become a lot more unhinged.

For some odd reason folks seem to believe moving to the heaviest LT tires are the fix to everything, it is not, this is the case where doing so can and will make things far worse.

You cannot ever make a 1/2 truck into a 3/4 or 1 ton truck by simply switching tires. It takes a whole bunch of OTHER parts and even then in the end you STILL have a truck that legally is a 1/2 ton truck.

You REALLY should stick to the MANUFACTURERS OEM tire size and style choices.. If you want to move from P to LT tires, choose wisely and don't over choose, a "C" load rating would have well exceeded a 1/2 ton capability by around 1,000 lbs on the axle and it would have done that with 45 PSI.. The E load rated will most likely need around 60-65 PSI to be near the "C" load rating..

Should be illegal for tire shops to sell E load rated LT tires to 1/2 truck owners.

Heavier tire is not "always" better.

All I can say is another "amateur day" rookie mistake [emoticon] ..

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