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Buzzcut1

Norcal

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Posted: 07/19/20 08:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok as a horse hauling guy with a Truck Camper and know tongue weights and horse trailer dynamics and having used my set up to go from San Francisco to Lexington KY and back this is my .02

You can modify your F350 SRW to "do " the job. It will take 19.5 tires and wheels to handle the load. You will need a super hitch, a super truss extension, and a weight distribution hitch. The suspension at the rear will either need a beefed up spring pack beefier anti sway bars, and something like upper and lower Torklift stable loads and airbags to level everything I rolled that way for years.

Then I bought a F350 CC 4x4 Long bed Diesel Dually. The improvement is amazing. Little sway, great handling even in high winds and a much more relaxing drive. I do have upper and lower Stable Loads and Airlift 5000 extreme air bags ( only need the airbags to level the rig when towing the horse trailer). I still needed the super hitch, 48" super truss and a weight distribution hitch

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2011 F350 6.7L Diesel 4x4 CrewCab longbed Dually, 08 Lance 1055, Torqlift Talons, Fast Guns, upper and lower Stable Loads, Super Hitch, 48" Super Truss, Airlift loadlifter 5000 extreme airbags


bwlyon

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Posted: 07/20/20 02:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Welcome to the rude awakening of trying to figure out what Truck camper to get with not much cargo capacity. This is especially true when you initially have high expectations of your truck to haul a nicely equipped and sized truck camper. I know the dilemma, been there done that! I thought I’d hit pay dirt with a gas powered Ram 3500 with 4060 pounds of payload, only to be let down when I bought a nice camper with a claimed wet weight of 3250 lbs. The true wet weight ready to camp was just shy of 5000 pounds. I’m overweight everywhere but the front axle. Which brings be to this, the campers you are indeed looking for are going to be smaller campers with minimal frills to stay under the manufacturer’s guidelines. To be honest an 8.5 foot pop up camper is gonna be the most like candidate. However, if you don’t mind going over your GVWR, but under your rear axle capacity an 8.5 foot hard side camper will likely work. No 9-12 footers with all the bells and whistles they are going to be to heavy. Good luck.

* This post was edited 07/20/20 03:48am by bwlyon *

ticki2

NH

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Posted: 07/20/20 04:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cptqueeg wrote:

Couple questions on the topic.

Does each seating position deduct 150lbs(Ford) from the payload?

Where can you source 19.5" wheels and tires for SRW (other than Rickson)?

I'm planning on a pop-up TC on a SRW, but want to tow a 19' boat or utility trailer at times.


I'll try to answer your first question . The short answer is some of it . Some of the passenger weight is carried by the front axle , some by the rear . To know how much goes to each you would have to weight the truck with all seats filled and then with only driver and passenger . Subtract the difference on the rear axle weights and that's what you can add the the payload . It's actually a little more complicated than that but it's close enough .


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bighatnohorse

Gig Harbor - Cave Creek

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Posted: 07/20/20 08:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

.... our truck sticker says max weight for cargo and occupants is about 3100 pounds.


I assume that you're looking at the tag on the door frame?
The door frame tag weight limit is based on the load capacity of the tires.

If you would look at the print on your tire wall for the tire's rated load capacity - you will see that it is only a few hundred pounds more than the door frame max weight.

This fact is consistent throughout various truck models.
(And you will read a lot of posts about GVWR and axle ratings etc, etc. but your crucial need is to understand where the weak link is in your truck's laod carry rating.)


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Kayteg1

California > Nevada

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Posted: 07/20/20 08:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bighatnohorse wrote:



I assume that you're looking at the tag on the door frame?
The door frame tag weight limit is based on the load capacity of the tires...


When that might happen, I have never seen it.
Door sticker is TAXABLE rating and has very loose connection to truck ratings.
For example on my dually numbers are about.
Taxable cargo 5000lb.
Combined axle ratings give me 8000lb cargo
Combined tire ratings would give me 10,000lb cargo, but I rather stay with axle limit.
But once again, front axle capacity is not usable with TC, so it all comes to rear axle rating.





cptqueeg

Idaho

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Posted: 07/20/20 09:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ticki2 wrote:

cptqueeg wrote:

Couple questions on the topic.

Does each seating position deduct 150lbs(Ford) from the payload?

Where can you source 19.5" wheels and tires for SRW (other than Rickson)?

I'm planning on a pop-up TC on a SRW, but want to tow a 19' boat or utility trailer at times.


I'll try to answer your first question . The short answer is some of it . Some of the passenger weight is carried by the front axle , some by the rear . To know how much goes to each you would have to weight the truck with all seats filled and then with only driver and passenger . Subtract the difference on the rear axle weights and that's what you can add the the payload . It's actually a little more complicated than that but it's close enough .


Thanks, makes sense.

bighatnohorse

Gig Harbor - Cave Creek

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Posted: 07/20/20 06:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

bighatnohorse wrote:



I assume that you're looking at the tag on the door frame?
The door frame tag weight limit is based on the load capacity of the tires...


When that might happen, I have never seen it.


Please don't digress into "taxable" babble - it doesn't apply.
Please spend some time at a truck dealership - you'll have to ditch the sales people first - and it will happen after your first three visits - and then look at the axles, the tires, the load ratings and see how they vary from truck-to-truck.
(Yes, it takes some homework.)

You, as will anyone, will begin to see how the GVWR and axle ratings are established by the truck manufacturer.
The real axle load ratings are established by the axle manufacturer - not the Ford/Chevy/Ram manufacturers - and never listed on the door frame.

You will see the same axles on different truck models - but the "axle rating" will vary - and it will always be dependent on the tire load rating.
Usually a few hundred pounds under the tire load rating will be the trucks GVWR and axle rating.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 07/21/20 11:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Safe is subjective. Truck rated capacities are subjective.
Take it from there.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

3 tons

NV.

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Posted: 07/21/20 06:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DRW...

adamis

Northern California

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Posted: 07/27/20 08:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you only we're planning on hauling the camper, your truck would be fine for most campers available as evidenced by the thousands of single rear wheel trucks hauling campers on the highways today and the lack of news stories indicating that there are mass rollovers of said vehicles causing mayhem on the highways.

Yes, the fine details get into axle and tire ratings and staying under those is highly recommended. Trying to stay under the vehicles door tag weight will be an exercise in frustration and as others have noted, those door tags have more to do with taxes and registration fees than actual capacity.

However, it appears that hauling a horse trailer might also be in the works and that is a little different. Unless you are emotionally attached to the truck or financially limited, sell the truck and upgrade to a dually. What you want to do with towing horses and hauling a truck camper is doable on a single rear wheel but for me it always comes down to a tire blowout on the freeway. I feel much more comfortable driving down the freeway knowing I have the safety of a second tire should anything happen. Hauling animals in the trailer with significant emotional attachment is the tipping point in my calculations.

One suggestion though... If you are going to be hauling a horse trailer, consider having the tongue of the trailer modified so that it can be extended to meet the hitch of the truck with the camper on. I did this for my cargo trailer where I can extend the trailer tongue nearly four feet by just removing a pin and sliding the tongue out of the box frame. The advantage to this is that your don't need a super truss hitch which puts less bending moment stress on the frame of your truck, helps with ground clearance and sharp angle of attacks when hitting steep driveways and saves a lot of extra weight for not having a hitch extension.

* This post was edited 07/27/20 08:48am by adamis *


1999 F350 Dually with 7.3 Diesel
2000 Bigfoot 10.6 Camper


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