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 > Expert Towing Advice

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ZINGERLITE

Union Lake, MI

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Posted: 07/22/20 10:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mr_andyj wrote:

The #1 bit of info needed is
Where do you plan to tow, mountains, flat?
How far will you be towing?
How often will you tow?

Many vacationers just do not have time to take cross country trips, this eats into your days, so they take shorter trips, less than 3 hrs from home. This is different than towing across the country, over mountain passes, down mountains, through cross-winds...
For short trips you can just drive slow and deal with it, but long multi-day drives you will want to move at a decent speed likely.

If Chevy says you can tow the weight then you can tow it.
WD hitches do not add 100 lbs to the tongue weight.
Do use a WD hitch as that lessens some of the issues.
Check your hitch rating. There are different Classes of hitches from 1 to 5, 5 is the strongest and will rip the truck frame out before it breaks.

A trailer this size should have brakes, so that will be very important and an expensive controller is better than the cheap ones, but you say your truck already has it factory installed. good.
Keep brakes in top notch condition for safety. The trailer should be able to stop/slow itself so the truck only needs to slow itself.

Use low gear going down mountains and keep the speed slow without using the brakes much. Hot brakes will be dangerous. You may need to creep down in 2nd gear to really keep it safe (or if you have 9 gears then whatever low gear needed).

Light trucks and short wheel bases are not a friend of towing. These mid-sized trucks are considered light.

Again, for short infrequent trips you have enough truck to get you there.
For long drives on a regular basis it would be worth getting a bigger truck or a smaller trailer. I think you chose smaller trailer. Small as possible is some people's motto


Well said! i feel like the common theme on these threads is "you need a 1 ton". no one takes into consideration what type of towing and how often. you don't need to spend 80k on a 1ton to tow once or twice a year. A half ton will do just fine in a lot of cases. If you tow regularly then id consider the upgrade. If you can squeak by a couple times a year a half-ton or Colorado would do just fine. Id rather drive a half ton to work everyday then a 1 ton.

Jebby14

Windsor Ontario

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Posted: 07/22/20 11:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

curious how you think adding 100 lbs of hitch to a truck does not remove 100 lbs from payload available?


Q: Whats brown and sticky???

A: A Stick....


kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 07/22/20 11:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ZINGERLITE wrote:

mr_andyj wrote:

The #1 bit of info needed is
Where do you plan to tow, mountains, flat?
How far will you be towing?
How often will you tow?

Many vacationers just do not have time to take cross country trips, this eats into your days, so they take shorter trips, less than 3 hrs from home. This is different than towing across the country, over mountain passes, down mountains, through cross-winds...
For short trips you can just drive slow and deal with it, but long multi-day drives you will want to move at a decent speed likely.

If Chevy says you can tow the weight then you can tow it.
WD hitches do not add 100 lbs to the tongue weight.
Do use a WD hitch as that lessens some of the issues.
Check your hitch rating. There are different Classes of hitches from 1 to 5, 5 is the strongest and will rip the truck frame out before it breaks.

A trailer this size should have brakes, so that will be very important and an expensive controller is better than the cheap ones, but you say your truck already has it factory installed. good.
Keep brakes in top notch condition for safety. The trailer should be able to stop/slow itself so the truck only needs to slow itself.

Use low gear going down mountains and keep the speed slow without using the brakes much. Hot brakes will be dangerous. You may need to creep down in 2nd gear to really keep it safe (or if you have 9 gears then whatever low gear needed).

Light trucks and short wheel bases are not a friend of towing. These mid-sized trucks are considered light.

Again, for short infrequent trips you have enough truck to get you there.
For long drives on a regular basis it would be worth getting a bigger truck or a smaller trailer. I think you chose smaller trailer. Small as possible is some people's motto


Well said! i feel like the common theme on these threads is "you need a 1 ton". no one takes into consideration what type of towing and how often. you don't need to spend 80k on a 1ton to tow once or twice a year. A half ton will do just fine in a lot of cases. If you tow regularly then id consider the upgrade. If you can squeak by a couple times a year a half-ton or Colorado would do just fine. Id rather drive a half ton to work everyday then a 1 ton.


That's like saying I don't need gloves in the winter because I've only had frostbite twice.

Having the right truck for the job is wise once or 100 times and the OP may have enough truck. IDK

ZINGERLITE

Union Lake, MI

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Posted: 07/22/20 12:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

kellem wrote:


That's like saying I don't need gloves in the winter because I've only had frostbite twice.

Having the right truck for the job is wise once or 100 times and the OP may have enough truck. IDK


If your at or over payload a couple/few hundred pounds for a short trip once or twice a year i wouldn't see it as justification to spend more on a bigger truck. What your doing with it also comes into play. are you towing it to the local campground under an hour away? or are you pulling across the country and through the mountains? if its the latter id definitely upgrade the vehicle.

that being said i wouldn't pull a 10,000lb trailer with a ranger or a colorado.

mr_andyj

Georgia

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Posted: 08/03/20 10:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I will wear glove in the winter if I am out for a long period, but just for going outside for a few mins, or in a situation I can put hands in pockets I will not bother with gloves.

Every single thread about towing there will be several people who insist that you need a one-ton truck to pull a jet ski because that is safer. Your truck will be rated for what it can tow, those are your guidelines.

If you really want to do it right and are pulling a big trailer then get a class-8 truck with one rear axle. The motor will last one million miles and your mpg will be around 15. You will never have towing issues, the truck will never be under strain, and unlikely you will have break-downs like you would in a passenger vehicle that is near its limits all the time. Those little class-8s that pull the Coca-Cola trailers are about as small as they come and would be way more than any one-ton.
But, you are making a compromise, so based on what you plan to do that will be how much truck you decide you need.

TomG2

Central Illinois

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Posted: 08/03/20 12:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ZINGERLITE wrote:


that being said i wouldn't pull a 10,000lb trailer with a ranger or a colorado.


But they have a "tow rating" of 7,000 pounds or more!

Just kidding. That is why "tow ratings" are not the only thing to consider.

aftermath

Washington State

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Posted: 08/03/20 03:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mr_andyj wrote:

I will wear glove in the winter if I am out for a long period, but just for going outside for a few mins, or in a situation I can put hands in pockets I will not bother with gloves.

Every single thread about towing there will be several people who insist that you need a one-ton truck to pull a jet ski because that is safer. Your truck will be rated for what it can tow, those are your guidelines.

If you really want to do it right and are pulling a big trailer then get a class-8 truck with one rear axle. The motor will last one million miles and your mpg will be around 15. You will never have towing issues, the truck will never be under strain, and unlikely you will have break-downs like you would in a passenger vehicle that is near its limits all the time. Those little class-8s that pull the Coca-Cola trailers are about as small as they come and would be way more than any one-ton.
But, you are making a compromise, so based on what you plan to do that will be how much truck you decide you need.


Boy, I like your input. Of course it is steeped in common sense and lacks testosterone laden claims. I would like to second your comments earlier about having good and well adjusted trailer brakes. The theory is the truck brakes will stop the truck, the trailer brakes will stop the trailer. And, you know, this works well when they are properly set up, maintained and adjusted regularly. The controller is a really big part of the picture and if the built in one in your truck is good, then you are good to go. I tow a 25 ft trailer with a Tundra. Horrors! How I have survived since 2009 must be some kind of miracle. Upgraded to a 2017 a few years ago to get, among other things, a built in brake controller. It was, a piece of S*#@. They put in a timed controller and not a proportional controller. I took it out and installed my old Prodigy. I guess the point here is, if you have a built in controller you probably will be good to go. I did and I wasn't. I can't believe any other manufacture would do what Toyota did back in '17. Glad to hear that you are making decisions with safety and comfort in mind. Your first choice of trailer would have ended up with quite the challenge. I think you are moving in the right direction now . Best wishes.


2017 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab, 5.7L V8
2006 Airstream 25 FB SE
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ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 08/04/20 08:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

At least a 1/2 ton truck or a smaller trailer is the most expert advice I can give you.

Curly2001

Tucson, Arizona

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Posted: 08/04/20 11:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What I would look at is the width of the trailer versus the width of the truck. You don't think it is a big deal but it really is. You will need some big mirrors and when you look back at the trailer, you will be surprised at how much wider it is than your truck. It will push you down hills even if you try and go slow. You will struggle going up some hills and probably get frustrated with the whole deal. I towed a 19' Wilderness with a S-10 Blazer with the 4.3 V6 and would never do it again. The mass of the trailer against the truck just didn't work.
Good luck with your decision.
Curly


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ZINGERLITE

Union Lake, MI

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Posted: 08/05/20 09:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Curly2001 wrote:

What I would look at is the width of the trailer versus the width of the truck. You don't think it is a big deal but it really is. You will need some big mirrors and when you look back at the trailer, you will be surprised at how much wider it is than your truck. It will push you down hills even if you try and go slow. You will struggle going up some hills and probably get frustrated with the whole deal. I towed a 19' Wilderness with a S-10 Blazer with the 4.3 V6 and would never do it again. The mass of the trailer against the truck just didn't work.
Good luck with your decision.
Curly


The new mid size trucks are pretty similar to the old full-size trucks from 20 years ago. the Colorado is only 5" narrower than the full-size. on paper they compare to some of the older half tons.

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