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time2roll

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Posted: 08/08/20 05:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dedicated or shared 20 amp circuit?
Otherwise tighten all connections at the outlet and main panel and enjoy the cool air.


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Posted: 08/08/20 05:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RVs bounce and vibrate down the road and all electrical connections need to be tightened every 2 years. Junction boxes, EMS, ATM all CB panel connections etc. And all male blades need to be bright and clean.


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Posted: 08/08/20 05:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Damage to induction motors can happen with AC Voltage at 108V/lower

I wouldn't be running my A/C at those Voltages

Larger gauged wire extention cord and good dogbone adapter vs a puck style for use on 20A utlet


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Posted: 08/08/20 05:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

Dedicated or shared 20 amp circuit?
Otherwise tighten all connections at the outlet and main panel and enjoy the cool air.
Good point. The typical household plug is 15A and one of many on a 20A CB. As a result there are other loads on that circuit. A dedicated 20A plug to a dedicated 20A CB is the minimum for a RV IMHO.

I have a 8 outside plug circuit on a 15A CB with a lot of 14ga wire. Not knowing this I plugged my saw into the last plug and it would not cut hot butter let alone a 2x4. The circuit is to code.

azrving

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Posted: 08/08/20 09:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My whole house is wired in 12 gauge. From the panel to the bedroom plug that also runs out to one of my rv spots is about 140’. Its 80 degrees and i just turned the rv ac on. Starting volts 125. Ac draw 14 amps voltage 115 Pretty good for that long of run

jodeb720

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Posted: 08/08/20 10:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had my 5er out in front of the house a few weeks ago
I put my volt meter in a few of the outlets and found it between 120 and 121 consistently.

I turn on the AC and it dropped immediately down to 112 and hung in there, but as time went, the voltage dropped to 109, then 108.

That's when I switched it off.

I had a roll of 12gauge wire in the basement, unrolled it out for the 35' I needed put a couple of 20amp rated plug heads on it and connected the 5er's dogbone to the 30 amp plug and tried again.

The voltage started out exactly the same - 120-121, but as the AC started to work harder, the voltage did drop but only down to 113 - 112 and stayed there.

Bottom line, the 12gauge extension cord which is 50' long wasn't able to handle the current needed by my ac.

Now, I know there's some out there who will tell me that's not legit - and they are correct, but for an emergency, and not wanting to damage my AC unit, I'll go with it.

As it was, because the AC was on, I finished reassembling the inside of my 5er after a major repair and we were able to use it for the weekend (first time in 8 months).

theoldwizard1

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Posted: 08/09/20 05:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

azrving wrote:

My whole house is wired in 12 gauge. From the panel to the bedroom plug that also runs out to one of my rv spots is about 140’. Its 80 degrees and i just turned the rv ac on. Starting volts 125. Ac draw 14 amps voltage 115 Pretty good for that long of run

Curious. How are you measuring AC current ?

azrving

Oatman

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Posted: 08/09/20 05:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

azrving wrote:

My whole house is wired in 12 gauge. From the panel to the bedroom plug that also runs out to one of my rv spots is about 140’. Its 80 degrees and i just turned the rv ac on. Starting volts 125. Ac draw 14 amps voltage 115 Pretty good for that long of run

Curious. How are you measuring AC current ?


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Timeking

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Posted: 08/09/20 07:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I never plug my RV directly into any outlet at a campground; I use a Progressive Industries box that monitors amps, voltage. So I am monitoring voltage at the source NOT in or at the RV.

Based on what jodeb720 and azrving posted, my voltage drop is excessive. So that is now the question: Do I need to hire an electrician to run a dedicated line out to where the RV plugs in?

Also FYI, the AC has a slow start device so it doesn't kick in immediately and overload the generator when using that.

azrving

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Posted: 08/09/20 07:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Timeking wrote:

I never plug my RV directly into any outlet at a campground; I use a Progressive Industries box that monitors amps, voltage. So I am monitoring voltage at the source NOT in or at the RV.

Based on what jodeb720 and azrving posted, my voltage drop is excessive. So that is now the question: Do I need to hire an electrician to run a dedicated line out to where the RV plugs in?

Also FYI, the AC has a slow start device so it doesn't kick in immediately and overload the generator when using that.


I am starting out at an advantage though, my source is 125 v so there’s a 5 v bandaid right there. I don’t think ive ever had a residence with 120 volts. Iirc Ive always seen 124 125 etc. When i built the house before this one it had a new pole and transformer Installed but don’t remember if i had a refrigerator issue or flickering lights but i called them and they adjusted the transformer and it was then about 124 v iirc

The house im in now has a transformer on the pole on the property that drops down to my outdoor shut off panel then runs into the house sub panel about 25’.

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