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kellem

Shenandoah valley,VA

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Posted: 09/08/20 08:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Weldon wrote:

I drove a new one recently. Mileage when I started the trip was 7.4 the truck only had 23 miles on it. 250 miles later of highway driving it had climbed ti 11.6 mpg. I was not really impressed with the truck. Perhaps another trip would be better.


Go to any Ford forum and you'll find the 7.3 does way better than that once broken in but big displacement engines by nature aren't going to be fuel efficient.

FishOnOne

The Great State of Texas

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Posted: 09/08/20 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Looks like TFL's 7.3 had a coil wire go bad and the part maybe on back order.

Link


'12 Ford Super Duty FX4 ELD CC 6.7 PSD 400HP 800ft/lbs
"Built Ford Proud"
'16 Sprinter 319MKS "Wide Body"


FishOnOne

The Great State of Texas

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Posted: 09/08/20 07:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's some eye candy for you gear heads...

Link

danrclem

Ky.

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Posted: 09/09/20 08:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't know how many times I've heard that the 7.3 is a copy of the LS engine. I'd like to know what it is that makes it a copy and what the LS has that is exclusive to itself and this engine. I'm not saying that there aren't any similarities but what are they and what does the LS have that no other engine except this one have.

The original small block Chevy engines had the middle two exhaust ports very close to each other and the LS doesn't. Could it be said that the LS copied other manufacturers head designs. The way I look at it they all build off of each other.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/09/20 10:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

FishOnOne wrote:

Here's some eye candy for you gear heads...

Link


Looks like a great 1/4 mile motor stuffed into a Mustang! Unreal what can be had out of a stock NA gas engine!
Now if it could make more torque than any run of the mill clapped out 15 year old diesel pickup, it would be a good truck engine!


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

thomas201

Eastern Panhandle WV

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Posted: 09/09/20 01:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here are 6 pages of discussions of the old gas heavy duty truck motors. https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/447226-534-vs-everyone-else.html

I think this is the model for the new (?) 7.3. Us old timers remember when diesel heavy duty trucks were the minority, my FIL hauled freight on the eastern seaboard with a gas tractor. My father bought the first diesel Ford 9000 (the gas job would be a 900) dump truck where we worked in about 1971. Do you guys remember when the truck islands had the same number of gas and diesel pumps?

In the oilfield the first frac pumpers were surplus Allison aircraft engines. They were followed by turbine (international solar) jet engines, because diesels were too heavy to produce 1,000 hydraulic horsepower on a standard tandem truck. A Dowell B902 (I think) pumper was my first piece of frac equipment, that turboshaft on a cold day would break the power end of the pump before it ran out of power. Later came the two stage inter and after cooled diesel piston engines.

colliehauler

Mc Pherson KS USA

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Posted: 09/09/20 03:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

thomas201 wrote:

Here are 6 pages of discussions of the old gas heavy duty truck motors. https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/447226-534-vs-everyone-else.html

I think this is the model for the new (?) 7.3. Us old timers remember when diesel heavy duty trucks were the minority, my FIL hauled freight on the eastern seaboard with a gas tractor. My father bought the first diesel Ford 9000 (the gas job would be a 900) dump truck where we worked in about 1971. Do you guys remember when the truck islands had the same number of gas and diesel pumps?

In the oilfield the first frac pumpers were surplus Allison aircraft engines. They were followed by turbine (international solar) jet engines, because diesels were too heavy to produce 1,000 hydraulic horsepower on a standard tandem truck. A Dowell B902 (I think) pumper was my first piece of frac equipment, that turboshaft on a cold day would break the power end of the pump before it ran out of power. Later came the two stage inter and after cooled diesel piston engines.
A person I know had a old International dump truck with a 6 cylinder gas that was around 800ci if I remember correctly.

JRscooby

Indepmo

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Posted: 09/09/20 04:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

thomas201 wrote:

My father bought the first diesel Ford 9000 (the gas job would be a 900) dump truck where we worked in about 1971. Do you guys remember when the truck islands had the same number of gas and diesel pumps?



When I got into dump trucking most of the Louisville cab Fords with gas engines where badged as LT 880. Most of the 900s I saw had lighter front axles and where set up as tractor. But if it said "Super Duty" there was 850 in VIN.
I will never forget the first trip out of the quarry with the NTM 9000 with a 250 Cummins. The day before, with 427 GMC, pull the hill in 2+2. Top the hill, drop the auxiliary into direct, and let the air tank mufflers talk. Don't need brakes to hold 110,000 lbs until just before get to scale.
That 855 CID 250 hp did much better on the up, but didn't hold snot on the down.

steve-n-vicki

arkansas

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Posted: 09/09/20 07:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have about 13,000 miles on my 7.3, I’m averaging 14 miles to the gallon combination 30 % highway 70% city driving, Driving a 24 mile stretch of a straight level 2 Lane Rd. I can average 16.2 at 57 miles an hour in 10th gear, Pulling an 8 1/2 foot wide 16 foot 6‘6“ inside height enclosed car hauler trailer @‘70 mph was 9.8, I have a 14 foot dump trailer that is rated at 15,500 GVWR, the truck has no problem pulling this trailer @ it’s gross weight,

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/09/20 07:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^ Sounds a bit better than the 6.2 F250s that I had, although mine came with a gas card so generally driven like a rental!

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