Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Water pressure regulator question (yet another)
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 > Water pressure regulator question (yet another)

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a64armt

Greencastle PA

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Posted: 11/02/20 04:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Built-in vs external in-line water pressure regulator.

Our 5th wheel has a ShurFlo wall Mount Filler/regulator, this seems to be common on many RV’s (although our Minnie Winnie did not have one). This unit has a built-in 65psi regulator.

https://www.pentair.com/en/products/accessories/rv-plumbing-accessories/pressure_reducing_city_water_entry_wall_mount.html

Is this sufficient for water pressure management or should we still use an external / hose regulator at the water connection?

I was using a regulator at the faucet set around 40psi and the water pressure is annoyingly low (ie. Can’t use more than one item at a time (faucet, washer, toilet, etc).

Thoughts?

Thanks
OJ


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MFL

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Posted: 11/02/20 04:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've no experience with that oem auto regulator, but most RV gadgets are of cheap design. I would use a high quality adjustable unit at the source. One with a gauge on it, set 50-60 psi. My method is to fill my fresh tank, and use my pump, which supplies good pressure at all faucets, including the shower. It is safer too, and handy to just switch off, overnight, or if you leave the camper.

Jerry





Bumpyroad

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Posted: 11/02/20 06:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

why 40 psi?
bumpy





dougrainer

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Posted: 11/02/20 06:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NEVER use more than 1 pressure regulator at a time. Adding an extra will indeed diminish flow and pressure. I have a hook up at work to demonstrate this. I connect a standard in line RV regulator to the end of the shop hose(shop about 65 psi). I then add the 2nd and then 3rd Regulator and the customer sees that the volume pressure is almost none. MY preference is to have the Water Regulator(adjustable) at the CG faucet to help protect my potable feed hose from the sun and excess pressure. Doug

naturist

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Posted: 11/02/20 07:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:

NEVER use more than 1 pressure regulator at a time. Adding an extra will indeed diminish flow and pressure. I have a hook up at work to demonstrate this. I connect a standard in line RV regulator to the end of the shop hose(shop about 65 psi). I then add the 2nd and then 3rd Regulator and the customer sees that the volume pressure is almost none. MY preference is to have the Water Regulator(adjustable) at the CG faucet to help protect my potable feed hose from the sun and excess pressure. Doug


This.

And double on the regulator being as close to the source as possible. I once made the mistake of putting my regulator at the TT inlet. The white hose blew out.

* This post was edited 11/02/20 08:53am by naturist *





a64armt

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Posted: 11/02/20 07:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:

NEVER use more than 1 pressure regulator at a time. Adding an extra will indeed diminish flow and pressure. I have a hook up at work to demonstrate this. I connect a standard in line RV regulator to the end of the shop hose(shop about 65 psi). I then add the 2nd and then 3rd Regulator and the customer sees that the volume pressure is almost none. MY preference is to have the Water Regulator(adjustable) at the CG faucet to help protect my potable feed hose from the sun and excess pressure. Doug


I figured that was the case. I didn’t know the city water inlet was a pressure regulator as well until I had to replace it due to corrosion.

Makes sense and thank you for the info!

OJ

2 many 2

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Posted: 11/02/20 05:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:

NEVER use more than 1 pressure regulator at a time. Adding an extra will indeed diminish flow and pressure. I have a hook up at work to demonstrate this. I connect a standard in line RV regulator to the end of the shop hose(shop about 65 psi). I then add the 2nd and then 3rd Regulator and the customer sees that the volume pressure is almost none. MY preference is to have the Water Regulator(adjustable) at the CG faucet to help protect my potable feed hose from the sun and excess pressure. Doug


This is the correct answer, unfortunately, if you do a search with that regulator for leaks, you will find that it is a plastic Chinese multi piece assembly that is notorious for leaking at the seams.

This happened to me as well as many others, the best solution is to gut the face plate, install a solid metal inlet fitting in the original faceplate and start using a pressure regulator at the supply faucet as suggested.

ssthrd

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Posted: 11/02/20 07:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I suggest you get rid of the onboard PRV and get a good quality brand name (Watts, Mueller, Ford) PRV that you can install at the supply source. In my 40 odd years of installing municipal water systems, the highest line pressure I have seen was 180 PSI. A quality PRV should be good for at least 200 PSI, so if your system is less than that, one regulator will work for you, or you can get a two stage PRV that will do the trick for higher pressures. The manufacturer should be able to provide the max pressure that the PRV is designed for.

Whatever you choose to get, I would check the pressure setting at the RV the end of your supply hose before hooking it up to your RV. So...... put the new PRV at your source point, then put your hose on, and then put a pressure gauge at the end of your hose before you hook up. (there are some PRVs available with an integral gauge) Set it up with a valve so you can have a trickle of flow through the gauge because you will need it to adjust the PRV. To get to your target pressure, turn the nut/screw clockwise for more pressure, counterclockwise for less pressure. To fine tune if you want to, shut the valve at the RV end, and check the pressure. It will probably be a bit more than you saw on the gauge while you had a trickle of flow. I am comfortable with 60 PSI in my rig, but I definitely would not go over 80 PSI. Old plumbing and high pressure don't go together.

If you are happy, close the source valve, hook up to your RV, load it, and Bob's yur Uncle.

Hope this helps.


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wa8yxm

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Posted: 11/03/20 04:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

65 PSI is on the high pressure end.

Sureflo sells an "inline" (has male and female hose connections) unit that is IDENTICAL to the installed regulator with the following changes
Take an "installed" model. remove the "Bib" (Mounting flange) add a male hose adapter to the outlet. It is literally screwed on to the outlet end Identical "Works"

I would recommend a WATTS or ZURIN in-line. these are designed to be put in line in a house with pipe fittings not hose fittings but a 3/4 (or 1/2) inch unit works great with hose adapters applied.. They are Brass not plastic so don't freeze them.. They are REBUILD-ABLE but so is the Sureflo what I don't know is if you can get kits for the sure-flo The Watts and Zurin units are very much alike in design with a bell shapped "Upper" housing the mounting bolt of the "Bell" is the pressure adjustement and a brass Lower body The spring is in the bell. I tested mine by using the shower.. Set the pressure to 50 PSI static and opened the shower valve.. SureFlo dropped slightly.. ZURIN the needle did not even wiggle.


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