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 > Travelling from Nevada to Alaska in the Middle of Winter

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StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 02/06/21 06:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pipsfc wrote:

First of all, sorry for the delayed response. We had our household goods shipped this week and our home inspection on base, so it's been a busy week.

Next, I'll be trying to readjust the brake pads on the TT tomorrow. Not sure how to do it with mine but I'll be looking for videos. I've posted the image below of my brakes if anyone has advice.

[image]

Lastly, I use ULSD. Will diesel in Canada meet the requirement? I see the talk of #1 but I thought I could use only #2. I'm a noob... sorry.

Oh! Thank you for the cardboard option on the grille!


ya all we have is ULSD here also, I dont even know if you can buy the old leadded stuff anymore.

Steve


2014 F350 6.7 Platinum
2016 Cougar 330RBK

SideHillSoup

South Eastern British Columbia

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Posted: 02/06/21 08:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Like what Steve said, all our ( Canadian) Hwy diesel is ULSD and has been since about 2008, as directed by the Canadian Gov’t.
Soup.


2018 Northern Lite 8-11 EX Dry Bath
2017 Sierra SLE, 3500 HD / 4x4 / Duramax with a 6 speed Allison Trans
Torklift Super Hitch 20K, 48" Super Truss, front and rear frame mounted tie downs
Fast Gun Long Range SS Turnbuckles, Fast Gun locks

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 02/06/21 10:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Getting close!
I’m sure you’re busy.
Adjusting the brakes is easy. And presume you didn’t have to adjust them down to remove the drums. Doesn’t hurt to get them just right though.
In your pic, bottom of the brakes in the middle the piece that connect between the 2 pads has a little “star wheel”. Official term lol. And the backing plate should have a knockout with a rubber plug in it to access it when the drum is on.
Spin the wheel to thread the adjuster out or in. Make sure you know which direction to go. Thread it out a bit until the drum slides over tight, back it off a little. Put drum on. Adjust out until drum drags a little on the pads. Adjust back in a little until it just spins free.
Or if your brakes worked well to begin with and you didn’t adjust any, they are fine.
On that note, snow and ice = go easy on the trailer brake gain to prevent the wheels locking up prematurely.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 02/06/21 10:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good thoughts on fuel.
Your truck will run fine on whatever is at the pumps. Canada and US. And fuel is treated for the expected weather in the geographical area.
IE you shouldn’t have to add anything to fuel bought due to temps.
However, if you fill up in Vancouver and somehow make it to -30 deg weather it may not be treated enough.
Added security. This is the one time I’d say add some antigel treatment at each tank just to be safe, once you get into cold country. And carry a bottle of 911 in the event you should happen to gel up. And don’t buy any greater than B5 bio diesel if given the option.
Again, everyone up there drives their diesels around all winter. You shouldn’t expect any issues. Only recommend the extra measures because hampering a cross continent trip due to some silly old fuel from bfe northern BC is a very small chance of happening but not worth risking with family in tow, extreme cold and a schedule to make.

Pipsfc

Nevada

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Posted: 02/06/21 12:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks all for the help again. I feel better about the fuel. I believe the 911 also comes in a standard additive to prevent gelling. I think that's what I saw when I was looking at it. I'm definitely get the 911 as well.

I did watch a video on YouTube for the brakes. I feel confident I can take care of it easily.

Getting the truck serviced as I type this to prep it for the trip. We leave in a few days and getting excited!

Pipsfc

Nevada

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Posted: 02/06/21 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So everyone makes adjusting the brakes look easy, but not me. I can easily tighten but not loosening. The star won't turn I guess clockwise. Any advice?

I'll edit my post. I moved to the opposite wheel on the same axel and I seem to have no issues with that one. It appears the star adjustor on the other wheel just doesn't want to loosen.

* This post was edited 02/06/21 07:47pm by Pipsfc *

AKsilvereagle

North Pole, Alaska

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Posted: 02/07/21 03:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are one of two options I recommend :

1 - Use the same spur adjuster...and lubricate BOTH the male and female thread assemblies with anti seize lube after cleaning the spur adjuster and threads on the assembly

2 - Replace with a new spur adjuster assembly...and lubricate BOTH the male and female thread assemblies with anti seize lube

On rigs still using the current assembly parts (like the travel trailer on this thread), what I do with the same spur adjuster is mark a dot on a tooth or on the side of the round wheel at any position (like 12 o' clock) before rotating it, so you know how many full turns it takes to remove the thread assembly which in turn knowing the exact position it originally was when you reassemble it after cleaning and lubricating the threads....

I used brakeleen to clean old assemblies, and apply a light lube spray on the threads and thread hole, installing fully in and back out to ensure the assembly turns freely and knowing there is no piitted or hang up areas of the assembly - before I re-lubricated the threads again with anti seize lube by applying it on both male and female threads, screw the assembly all the way in and back out, and reinstall again to original position (which will be very close to the original adjustment)....

This is a new spur adjuster I purchased when I assembled all new rear shoe brakes on my 1973 half ton F 100 Ford pickup that needed it :


[image]

Even with the brand new part, I still fully worked in the anti seize lube shown on this spur adjuster assembly (the silver-gray color coating the threads)

One of the old spur adjuster assembly still had three minor hangup spots after lubricating (but still fully turned throughout after cleaned and lubricated) as the other side was still usable and turned freely with no hangup spots, however I replaced it with a new one anyway since the other side needed the new spur assembly and saved that used good part for a spare if needed....

[image]

As you can see the spur adjuster at the bottom of the brake hardware on this axle, the advantage of applying the anti seize lube is the adjuster will always turn freely and protect the threads at the same time...

[image]

As an additional precaution shown here on the backing plate - I coated the brake shoe pin mount areas with grease to slow down the long term rusting process as I also coat the pin mounts themselves with grease on the inside of the brake assembly, installed a vacuum cap over the bleed valve to protect it, etc. as the tricks of the trade of living in the arctic and avoiding long term problems.

I have yet to have any problem with a seized, rusted, or dried up spur assembly ever re-occur under extreme cold or extreme heat conditions, even in the long term when I apply anti seize lube on the spur assemblies, - the spur adjuster will always turn freely at all times whenever the self adjuster kicks in....I mainly use anti seize lube for brake assemblies, exhaust nuts and bolts, and other assemblies where areas of heat or extreme moisture surround it so it will not be stubborn for any disassembly and what have ya - great stuff.


1975 Ford F250 2WD Ranger XLT (Owned June 2013)
460 V8- C6 Trans- 3.73:1 (171K Total Mi)
2000 Fleetwood Angler 8ft Cabover
Air Lift 1000 (Front)
Hellwig 3500 lb Helper Springs (rear)
Hellwig Front and Rear Sway Bars
Goodyear G971 LT Series (siped)


Pipsfc

Nevada

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Posted: 02/07/21 09:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

AKsilvereagle wrote:

There are one of two options I recommend :

1 - Use the same spur adjuster...and lubricate BOTH the male and female thread assemblies with anti seize lube after cleaning the spur adjuster and threads on the assembly

2 - Replace with a new spur adjuster assembly...and lubricate BOTH the male and female thread assemblies with anti seize lube

On rigs still using the current assembly parts (like the travel trailer on this thread), what I do with the same spur adjuster is mark a dot on a tooth or on the side of the round wheel at any position (like 12 o' clock) before rotating it, so you know how many full turns it takes to remove the thread assembly which in turn knowing the exact position it originally was when you reassemble it after cleaning and lubricating the threads....

I used brakeleen to clean old assemblies, and apply a light lube spray on the threads and thread hole, installing fully in and back out to ensure the assembly turns freely and knowing there is no piitted or hang up areas of the assembly - before I re-lubricated the threads again with anti seize lube by applying it on both male and female threads, screw the assembly all the way in and back out, and reinstall again to original position (which will be very close to the original adjustment)....

This is a new spur adjuster I purchased when I assembled all new rear shoe brakes on my 1973 half ton F 100 Ford pickup that needed it :


[image]

Even with the brand new part, I still fully worked in the anti seize lube shown on this spur adjuster assembly (the silver-gray color coating the threads)

One of the old spur adjuster assembly still had three minor hangup spots after lubricating (but still fully turned throughout after cleaned and lubricated) as the other side was still usable and turned freely with no hangup spots, however I replaced it with a new one anyway since the other side needed the new spur assembly and saved that used good part for a spare if needed....

[image]

As you can see the spur adjuster at the bottom of the brake hardware on this axle, the advantage of applying the anti seize lube is the adjuster will always turn freely and protect the threads at the same time...

[image]

As an additional precaution shown here on the backing plate - I coated the brake shoe pin mount areas with grease to slow down the long term rusting process as I also coat the pin mounts themselves with grease on the inside of the brake assembly, installed a vacuum cap over the bleed valve to protect it, etc. as the tricks of the trade of living in the arctic and avoiding long term problems.

I have yet to have any problem with a seized, rusted, or dried up spur assembly ever re-occur under extreme cold or extreme heat conditions, even in the long term when I apply anti seize lube on the spur assemblies, - the spur adjuster will always turn freely at all times whenever the self adjuster kicks in....I mainly use anti seize lube for brake assemblies, exhaust nuts and bolts, and other assemblies where areas of heat or extreme moisture surround it so it will not be stubborn for any disassembly and what have ya - great stuff.


AKsilvereagle, you always provide outstanding information. I really appreciate that.

I am going to replace my stuck adjuster because one of the spurs got slightly disfigured when I was trying to rotate it. I was trying to put a lot of pressure on it and the screwdriver just slipped off. I have since purchased a brake spoon to help. I now need to watch a video on how to replace it.

Darryl&Rita

Grande Prairie, Alberta

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Posted: 02/07/21 10:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't be in too big of a rush. It's -42* C an hour from Mile Zero, Alaska Highway, and most of Alberta is experiencing very similar temps. I'd expect cold well south of the border, so be ready for it.


***UPDATE 2006 3500 SRW MegaCab pulling a 2007 fleetwood 5'er

time2roll

Southern California

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Joined: 03/21/2005

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Posted: 02/07/21 10:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Better hurry, winter will be over soon [emoticon]


2001 F150 SuperCrew
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