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KD4UPL

Swoope, VA

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Posted: 11/22/20 04:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The truck's tow rating is correct but it's not that simple. You have to use your head and figure out the other ratings like payload and axle weights.
There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.
So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.

wing_zealot

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Posted: 11/22/20 06:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

KD4UPL wrote:

..There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.lo

So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.
You apprently aren't familiar with the SAE J2807 standard, which is how truck ratings are established, or you would never had made such a ridiculous statement.

* This post was edited 11/22/20 06:57pm by wing_zealot *

wing_zealot

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Posted: 11/22/20 06:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wing_zealot wrote:

KD4UPL wrote:

..There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.

So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.
You apprently aren't familiar with the SAE J2807 standard, which is how truck ratings are established, or you would never had made such a ridiculous statement.


JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 11/23/20 08:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

KD4UPL wrote:

The truck's tow rating is correct but it's not that simple. You have to use your head and figure out the other ratings like payload and axle weights.
There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.
So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.

Good points. Lots of newbs get taken in by GVWR based payloads... especially on many of todays new gen trucks with high gvwr numbers. Even one ton srw and 3/4 ton trucks can have higher payloads than the trucks rear axle/tires/wheels/rear spring packs are rated for.
The F150HD did have a 8200 gvwr but those gvwr based payloads were far exceeding the F150HD 4800 rawr numbers. Even the newer 7850 gvwr with the 33xx lb payload overloads the 4800 rawr in many cases.

Tow rating cover all types of rv and non rv trailers.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

'03 2500 QC Dodge/Cummins HO 3.73 6 speed manual Jacobs Westach
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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 11/23/20 10:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lots of newbs also get sucked into the “one too many bags of Cheetos in the truck bed and you’ll be a menace to the roadway and society in general” paranoia that is fairly rampant on this website and many others.
Typically processed by “experts” who have googled way more than they’ve towed....


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

TomG2

Central Illinois

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Posted: 11/23/20 09:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Buy it and try it. Then come back on here asking about fancy hitches, suspension upgrades, and tires that don't feel "Squishy". Happens every day. Then start shopping for an adequate tow vehicle.

* This post was edited 11/24/20 02:05am by TomG2 *

philh

Belleville MI

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Posted: 11/24/20 06:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

Lots of newbs also get sucked into the “one too many bags of Cheetos in the truck bed and you’ll be a menace to the roadway and society in general” paranoia that is fairly rampant on this website and many others.
Typically processed by “experts” who have googled way more than they’ve towed....

You forgot, and will be sued by every lawyer in the county when you crash into grandma going to church.

I've towed at gross, and was probably over. Towing under capacity limit is a less stressful experience. I was surprised at the difference "E" tires made on my F150 tho.

LanceRKeys

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Posted: 11/24/20 09:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Really, the best solution is to buy the trailer you like best and try pulling it with the 150, if your truck isn’t enough get a SRW 350. Towing will be easy again. Then, since you have a big truck, get a bigger trailer....

KD4UPL

Swoope, VA

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Posted: 11/25/20 05:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wing_zealot wrote:

KD4UPL wrote:

..There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.lo

So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.
You apprently aren't familiar with the SAE J2807 standard, which is how truck ratings are established, or you would never had made such a ridiculous statement.


None of my statements are ridiculous. Their are multiple types of trailers, they do have different physical characteristics and quirks, they do tow differently. Wind resistance and tongue weight are absolutely factors that must be considered in how suitable a tow vehicle is.
Are you suggesting that a trailer that vastly overloads the rear axle, tires, and hitch is just fine as long as it weighs no more than the "tow rating" of the vehicle?

wing_zealot

East of the Mississippi

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Posted: 11/25/20 06:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

KD4UPL wrote:

wing_zealot wrote:

KD4UPL wrote:

..There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.lo

So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.
You apprently aren't familiar with the SAE J2807 standard, which is how truck ratings are established, or you would never had made such a ridiculous statement.


None of my statements are ridiculous. Their are multiple types of trailers, they do have different physical characteristics and quirks, they do tow differently. Wind resistance and tongue weight are absolutely factors that must be considered in how suitable a tow vehicle is.
Are you suggesting that a trailer that vastly overloads the rear axle, tires, and hitch is just fine as long as it weighs no more than the "tow rating" of the vehicle?
No, I'm suggesting the tow rating is not established with a flatbed trailer. Per J2807 standard, Its established with a high wall trailer with a 65 Sft frontal area; completely opposite your statement.

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