Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Incline Parking Tips
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 > Incline Parking Tips

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dieseltruckdriver

Black Hills of SD

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Posted: 12/11/20 01:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

abmatos714 wrote:

MFL wrote:

With that amount of slope, and using the HD rubber chocks, I don't see a need to use the X-chocks. The weight of trailer allowed to snug up to the chocks, before disconnect, should stop any back/forth motion.

Don't forget to level trailer for fridge operation.

Jerry


Thank you. That’s what I was looking for, I wasn’t sure if the slope was as bad as I thought or not. I’ve seen some ways to build up under the tongue Jack to help level out, are there any issues with strain on the axles or is the slope minimal enough that chocking and leveling will suffice?

I agree with this. I also park my 5er on a much steeper slope. Enough that my front axle is not in contact with the ground. But then again I chock my wheels if I am on flat ground. If I were you I would build a blocking "system" for the front so you can use it the same way in the same spot every time. That is what I do to hopefully prevent any accidental runaways.


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abmatos714

Reading, Pa

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Posted: 12/11/20 02:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

camperfamily wrote:

We use 6x6 treated lumber cut as chocks. With a large 5th on a driveway MUCH steeper than that. Use the good chocks, allow trailer to settle against them as part of unhitching. Level the rig and move on. If concerned use chocks on the downhill side of each wheel.

Enjoy your new house!!!


Thank you! I appreciate your response. I didn’t think it was all that steep but reading other forums and seeing pictures I was really second guessing myself. I will make sure to have the good chocks ready to go for when we move

camperfamily

New Jersey

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Posted: 12/11/20 02:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

abmatos714, I actually fully extend the landing gear, nearly raising the front axle off the ground and I'm still several inches low to the front. I can easily park a sedan under the king pin of the 5ver its up so high. Ideal, no but its secure and works. Storage is prohibitively expensive here.


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JRscooby

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Posted: 12/11/20 02:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To hold it solid, and keep anybody from moving chocks I would get a pair of good rubber mud flaps for a truck, some nuts and all-thread and some short 4X4s. Bolt the board to 1 end of each flap. When parking, take trailer back past where you want it. Lay flaps in front of tires, pull onto flap and against block.
Note if the drive is steep, the rear might hit ground before the front is high enough to call "level" If that is the case build a pair of ramps with stop block on top, and rubber on bottom so pull on rubber before ramp.

mobeewan

Hampton, Va

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Posted: 12/11/20 02:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Build 2 chocks from 2x salt treated wood. Use plenty of screws.

Screw a piece of salt treated plywood to the bottom each chock using plenty of screws. Make the plywood the width of the chock side to side, but longer than the chock from front to back leaving it long enough as needed to extend under one tire on each side.

Back the trailer close to the garage door and place the chocks in front of the front trailer tires and roll the trailer onto the plywood making contact with the chocks. The weight of the trailer will keep the chocks from slipping and the trailer from rolling down hill.

* This post was edited 12/11/20 04:15pm by mobeewan *

Lwiddis

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Posted: 12/11/20 04:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

IMO ice is your number one enemy. Couple that with an incline, oh boy!


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profdant139

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Posted: 12/11/20 06:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

First, congratulations twice -- once for the new house and twice for having a built-in parking place on your driveway. You will be surprised at how often the trailer gets used as a getaway for folks in your family needing a little peace and quiet.

Second, our driveway is steeper than yours, and we have had no trouble with using ordinary rubber chocks. The heavy duty ones are better. It is very unlikely that anyone will be able to remove them -- the weight of the trailer secures them very well!

Third, if I understand it correctly, the nose of the trailer will be on the downhill side. If that is right, you will have to extend the jack pretty far, which is going to be pretty wiggly.

So to prevent that, stack a couple of very hefty wood blocks for the jack to rest on. The jack stem will be shorter, and the trailer will wiggle a lot less. And if you need to, do the same thing for the front stabilizer jacks.


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abmatos714

Reading, Pa

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Posted: 12/11/20 07:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

profdant139 wrote:

First, congratulations twice -- once for the new house and twice for having a built-in parking place on your driveway. You will be surprised at how often the trailer gets used as a getaway for folks in your family needing a little peace and quiet.

Second, our driveway is steeper than yours, and we have had no trouble with using ordinary rubber chocks. The heavy duty ones are better. It is very unlikely that anyone will be able to remove them -- the weight of the trailer secures them very well!

Third, if I understand it correctly, the nose of the trailer will be on the downhill side. If that is right, you will have to extend the jack pretty far, which is going to be pretty wiggly.

So to prevent that, stack a couple of very hefty wood blocks for the jack to rest on. The jack stem will be shorter, and the trailer will wiggle a lot less. And if you need to, do the same thing for the front stabilizer jacks.


Noted! Thank you for the support and advice! Do you suggest constructing a “tower” of 2x6/8s with screws or just stacking them each time I park? I’ve seen a couple pics of log cabin style stacks to rest the jack into. I wasn’t sure if my slope was enough to need something like that or not. I know when we move it will take a few tries til I figure out how to park it right. Hopefully by the time the season starts back up I’ll know what I am doing lol

Jackathan

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Posted: 12/11/20 07:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is how I do it. If you look close, I also attach a 1/4" cable around the axle and use a lever jack to tension it. It is attached to a post in the garage. Probably overkill, as I have been parking 3 different campers in the driveway in this manner for over 10 years, and non have ever moved at all. If storms are forecasted, I will lower the front all the way to help stabilize it.

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Jackathan

Nebraska

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Posted: 12/11/20 08:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I see this is in the travel trailer section. I also kept a Forest River Cherokee 28BHG in this spot. With that one, I would raise the front as far as the jack would go, then lower the front stabilizers for support. Then, I would retract the jack, and place more blocks under it. Then I could raise the front to level the trailer.

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