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 > How will my new F350 behave in cold temps?

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artie2908

Central Vermont

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Posted: 12/20/20 12:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have been in very cold weather with my duramax pickup truck where I was unable to plug in the block heater. Even though it sure would have been preferable, it wasnt a problem. Started right up I do use low viscosity oil 5W-40
Cold weather---- -20 to -30 below

riah

ny

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Posted: 12/20/20 01:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Winter of Jan 2018? New Year’s Eve - drove to Canton Ny to pick up kid from college, and the temps dipped to below zero and we experienced the gelling issue-> not a fun experience in the middle of nowhere, in frigid temps! We had filled up at a open fueling middle of nowhere (presume in hindsight it was not winter blended) - Thankfully somebody stopped and we limped the vehicle to his driveway a couple miles away and he called a tow truck. Our truck spent a week at closest dealership miles away and thankfully tow truck driver had room for all 3 adults and dropped us off at hotel near the dealership. Also thankfully, my sis and BIL drove 3 hrs to get us and brought us back home! Long story short, It was an expensive mistake and left us without the vehicle for almost 2 weeks! We will never make such mistake again! Definitely will be using addictive for anti-gelling gong forward when temps will be dropping below 0 F!

Grit dog wrote:

^What Wadcutter, Scooby and IdaD said.
In 30+ years of driving, operating, maintaining or being responsible for 100s or 1000s of Diesel engines from Phoenix AZ to Alaska’s North Slope (in the winter), I’ve only seen one pronounced issue with fuel gelling and it was in Colorado during a record breaking cold snap.
Adding anti gel as a matter of course is not necessary at all and only remotely needed or applicable if you have the ability or chance of getting un treated fuel. Example, fuel suppliers in the desert southwest dont winter treat fuel (presumably based on past experience), so your greatest risk would be traveling from somewhere “warm” and getting to somewhere “cold” like the mountains, on the same tank of fuel. Outside Vegas, there are stations in the low land that actually advertise treated fuel for those heading N to Utah mountains. Presumably because the fuel down in Vegas is not winter blended?
I dunno for sure but that’s the only time I use anti gel as a matter of course, if I’m heading from known warm area to known cold area on the same tank
Of fuel.
And your truck is new enough that it doesn’t need to be plugged in to start until very low temps.


ksss

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Posted: 12/20/20 02:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I found it is worth throwing some Power Service Red bottle in the pickups during the Winter. Stations are pretty good about Winter blending, but not all stations are the same and sometimes mistakes are made. The red bottle can save you from getting stranded if you catch it soon enough.


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4x4ord

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Posted: 12/20/20 02:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We buy fuel in fairly large quantities (about 15,000 gallons at a time) The last time we filled our tanks was with 100% summer fuel and so far, this winter we've been using this summer fuel and I haven't had to use an anti gel additive. I have had my truck gel on me and it can be a bit of a nuisance. I've always been able to get it into a heated shop or get an additive into it before it quits entirely.


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ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 12/20/20 03:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

not sure how easy the fords are to start at low temps, but several times I've started my duramax at -30F after sitting out overnight with no block heater. just turned the key waited for the glow plug light to go out, turned the key to off, repeated and when the glow plug light went off, turned key to start. started right up, noisy as all getout, some smoke, after about 45 seconds went into the high idle max backpressure mode to warm up quicker.

Even at these low temps didn't have any fuel additive, just made sure I had filled up nearby at a local station so I knew I had blended fuel for the expected low temps.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 12/20/20 06:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ksss wrote:

I found it is worth throwing some Power Service Red bottle in the pickups during the Winter. Stations are pretty good about Winter blending, but not all stations are the same and sometimes mistakes are made. The red bottle can save you from getting stranded if you catch it soon enough.

911 is for after you’re stranded. Wonder why so many injection pump issues?
Not for treating fuel on a regular basis.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 12/20/20 06:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4x4ord wrote:

We buy fuel in fairly large quantities (about 15,000 gallons at a time) The last time we filled our tanks was with 100% summer fuel and so far, this winter we've been using this summer fuel and I haven't had to use an anti gel additive. I have had my truck gel on me and it can be a bit of a nuisance. I've always been able to get it into a heated shop or get an additive into it before it quits entirely.


What’s your point? Waiting until Alberta has a cold snap to treat the fuel or??

Has nothing to do with the OPs question or even this off track discussion other than to say Alberta has not gotten good and cold yet this year.

pitch

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Posted: 12/21/20 09:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Why is it a problem? Go to Wal Mart or any auto parts store and pull out six bucks for some anti gell.
Ain't gonna hurt a dang thing, but may save you several hundred if you do catch a very cold spell and freeze your fuel.
Fuel distributers are in business to make a buck, so they put the bare minimum they feel effective in the fuel.
Better safe than sorry, treat your fuel!!!

Diamond c

West ky

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Posted: 12/21/20 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I work for a fuel distributor and we treat all our fuel this time of year. If they don’t then they will loose a lot of business and go broke when the costumers that do stay make them fix their truck when it does tell up.

PA12DRVR

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Posted: 12/21/20 10:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Late to the party... but I routinely drive three (3!) diesel vehicles in and around Los Anchorage, AK. 1 older chevy duramax and 2 fords with the 6.7 .

Fuel gelling is not a concern as the fuel up here is blended to address colder temps.

On all of the diesels, I will routinely just start them (ain't remote starts great) and let them warm up until I'm ready to go....in temps down to -15 or so. Not that that's a hard limit, just the coldest I've seen in Los Anchorage recently.

In colder weather, such as my 10-day sojourn in Squarebanks last winter, when the bank temp sign regularly read "-3x" or, on one PITA day, "-42", I'll plug them in.

As mentioned, good batteries help a lot, but in any case, for temps in the 'teens or even single digits, you won't need to worry about anything.


CRL
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