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SAR Tracker

Central Oregon

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Posted: 12/20/20 06:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wiring connections are twisted and tested - all works as advertised. Now to make them permanent. Crimp or solder?


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CA Traveler

The Western States

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Posted: 12/20/20 06:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Either will be OK. I generally prefer solder with heat shrink tubing which takes longer but I like the more finished look.


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BurbMan

Noblesville, IN

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Posted: 12/21/20 06:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CA Traveler wrote:

Either will be OK. I generally prefer solder with heat shrink tubing which takes longer but I like the more finished look.


Agreed. Generally it's hard to work with a soldering iron on a stereo install because of all the wires and the tight space behind the unit. Plus the connections are inside, so corrosion is not an issue, so I generally just crimp these.


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drgslayr

Albuquerque

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Posted: 12/21/20 08:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Solder butt connectors.


I used these solder and heat shrink in one.

DrewE

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Posted: 12/21/20 09:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another reasonable option is appropriately-sized (i.e. small) wire nuts, preferably with a bit of electrical tape to secure them against unscrewing. They're easy to undo if or when you want to upgrade the radio.

Crimp and soldered connections are both plenty secure enough if properly made, as well.





deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 12/24/20 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SAR Tracker wrote:

Wiring connections are twisted and tested - all works as advertised. Now to make them permanent. Crimp or solder?


Crimp.

Soldering is generally frowned upon for mobile applications. RV manufacturers, automotive manufacturers, etc don't ever solder their wiring connections.


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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 12/29/20 02:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

deltabravo wrote:

SAR Tracker wrote:

Wiring connections are twisted and tested - all works as advertised. Now to make them permanent. Crimp or solder?


Crimp.

Soldering is generally frowned upon for mobile applications. RV manufacturers, automotive manufacturers, etc don't ever solder their wiring connections.


That is a "old wives tale".

The "fact" is that soldering is not done in RV/Automotive applications because of SPEED AND COST.

Has zero to do with quality or the supposed wire breakage from vibration.

If what you said was true, then perhaps you care to explain as to why EVERY "circuit board" in every vehicle and RV actually has every parts SOLDERED to said board?

If crimping was vastly "superior" then I would think the electronics industry would have developed a "crimp" connection of components to the circuit boards..

The truth is, soldering takes skilled labor, it takes prep and takes more time to perform but the connection IS far more reliable than crimping.

You are more than welcome to continue dreaming that crimping is better but myself after 22yrs in the manufacturing industry I choose soldering.. Over those years I HAVE seen the after effects of many bad crimps performed with poor tools or even worse, bad labor (yep, companies trade workers around the production floor like "Bubble Gum cards").. Some of those crimps broke wires, some never crimped well enough to hold the wires and often the crimps barely held long enough to get past QA and out the plant door causing the poor sap installing the items in the field a lot of grief when the device failed to work.

Roger10378

Goodrich, MI.

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Posted: 12/29/20 03:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I built experimental cars we were required to solder the crimped connections on anything that we made or modified.


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deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 01/03/21 08:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

If what you said was true, then perhaps you care to explain as to why EVERY "circuit board" in every vehicle and RV actually has every parts SOLDERED to said board?


That's an apples to oranges comparison.

Circuit boards are mounted to things to don't vibrate.

Wires in RVs are not secured in such a manner to prevent movement and vibration.

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 01/03/21 11:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

soldering is the best way to join wires and such in any aplication, but having said that, you have to be able to solder good for it to be good. cold joints and such cause cracks and issues. most places want fast and cheep so crimp conectors are the result. it takes time for some one to become proficient at soldering small gauge stranded wire. some companies have brought out crimp conector like products that have a band of solder in them and heat shrink ends. if you have a problm check these as they are natourous for cold solder joints as they only use a heat gun to actavate them and the wires are not cleaned properly.

learning to solder properly eliminates all the ssues but it takes time to learn and a little longer than using a crimp conector.

Steve


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