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cavie

Port Charlotte Fl/ Hindsdale MA

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Posted: 12/22/20 04:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

philh wrote:

are you sure the outlet is 20A?

Big power draws will be microwave, AC (during warmer periods), and the propane heater is a lesser item. Can you go with electric heat?



electric heat will add to the problem. use gas heat and gas hot water.


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2112

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Posted: 12/22/20 05:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Let's dig into this a little deeper for future reference. Anyone feel free to correct me.

I recommend a 50ft 12AWG extension. This will ideally produce a 3V drop at 15A. The adapter will produce about a 1V drop. Considering 120V at the outlet, the camper should have 115V while drawing 15A. That's 1725W. I like to try to not exceed 1700W while on this extension chord.

Using conservative numbers to account for the converter:
Furnace = 100W
Fridge on AC = 350W
Water heater on AC = 1500W
Microwave = 1300W
Standard light bulb = 20W each

Using these numbers, you can operate your furnace, some lights and the fridge on AC without coming close to the 1700W allotment. You can operate the furnace, fridge and microwave for a short period of time. You can operate the water heater or the microwave, but not at the same time. It's called power management.

Forget about the air conditioner. I do not recommend operating it on an extension chord.


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valhalla360

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Posted: 12/22/20 06:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2112 wrote:

Let's dig into this a little deeper for future reference. Anyone feel free to correct me.

I recommend a 50ft 12AWG extension. This will ideally produce a 3V drop at 15A. The adapter will produce about a 1V drop. Considering 120V at the outlet, the camper should have 115V while drawing 15A. That's 1725W. I like to try to not exceed 1700W while on this extension chord.

Using conservative numbers to account for the converter:
Furnace = 100W
Fridge on AC = 350W
Water heater on AC = 1500W
Microwave = 1300W
Standard light bulb = 20W each

Using these numbers, you can operate your furnace, some lights and the fridge on AC without coming close to the 1700W allotment. You can operate the furnace, fridge and microwave for a short period of time. You can operate the water heater or the microwave, but not at the same time. It's called power management.

Forget about the air conditioner. I do not recommend operating it on an extension chord.


Generally good analysis...a couple of comments to add:
- Check the voltage at the RV. 120v is a nominal voltage. It's common and within spec for it to vary between 104-127v (and voltage will vary over the course of the day). If you are on the high end, that's fine but at the low end, you have less available power. We have a $10 voltage meter that we leave plugged into an outlet in the trailer that's easy to see from the couch (even better are automated systems that will cut the voltage if it gets too low).
- If you do want to run an electric space heater, look at the wattage. We've never seen 1700w unit (not saying they don't exist). Most we've had have been 1200w or 1500w. If you keep everything else on propane, you can likely get away with running one.
- Air/con (not likely needed in winter) is a different animal. Heaters just pull what they are rated for (in amps). Electric motors (like the one running the compressor) have two requirements. Start up and continuous operation. Start up is often a multiple times as many amps but once started, you are likely looking at 9-12amps continuous for the air/con. As long as it starts quickly without struggle, you can likely run the air/con. Voltage is more critical here. Resistance loads (like heating elements) pull a given amperage. If voltage is low, the only real problem is they put out less heat but otherwise don't really care about the voltage. Electric motors though generally pull a certain wattage. If the voltage goes down, it pulls more amps to keep the wattage up. Amperage is what burns up power cords.


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Sjm9911

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Posted: 12/22/20 07:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Usally, if running the ac in the summer, i dont have anything else running but the lights. And maybe the radio. This isnt to say you cant run more, but i don't want to chance breaking stuff. Especially the ac compresser.


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2112

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Posted: 12/22/20 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I keep a Kill A Watt meter plugged into one of the outlets inside the camper to keep an eye on the voltage.

While he's in his parents driveway powered on an extension chord, and wants to use a 1200W or 1500W electric space heater, I would recommend another dedicated 12AWG extension chord tucked through the slide to power this heater. I don't know if I'd trust the cheap camper outlet to power the electric heater while the camper is on an extension chord.

* This post was edited 12/22/20 08:08am by 2112 *

GrandpaKip

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Posted: 12/22/20 09:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A 10 gauge RV extension cord is a good idea. With a decent dogbone, there’s no worry about regular extension cords. We have a 30’ one in addition to the 30’ main cord.


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Lwiddis

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Posted: 12/22/20 10:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Check the voltage at the RV. 120v is a nominal voltage."

Hughes makes a good voltage meter...Amazon at $15


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time2roll

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Posted: 12/22/20 10:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you arrive with a low battery the converter could draw close to 1000 watts for maybe 30 minutes to charge the battery.
Power will taper off after that. Should have no effect on the intended use.


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pianotuna

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Posted: 12/22/20 01:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you plan to use electric heat it is best to upgrade the "stab" connector outlets with good quality screw terminal outlets.

Otherwise--run a cord into the RV and use that for heating.

I've added 2 auxiliary shore power cords to my RV. So I can draw on the OEM 30, a 25, and 15 amp outlets.

I do use my autoformer to support voltage on the OEM 30.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

TravelinDog

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Posted: 12/23/20 02:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

azdryheat wrote:

The heater is propane so not an electric draw other than the fan. 110 should be fine.

If you don't have any Covid symptoms then you don't have Covid. No worries.


Not true AT ALL. There have been countless cases of people getting Covid from someone who was asymptomatic. I really doubt the OP would want to risk his parents getting sick or something even worse because
he had your attitude. [emoticon]

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