Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Tow Vehicles: determining pay load capacity
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 > determining pay load capacity

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JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 12/24/20 07:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A registered weight is good only in your state. Some states may require a different weight like a gvw or gvwr or even a gcw or so many pounds of laden weight or other states like mine have no weight for registering our trucks. Just axle/tires for safe/legal issues.
Like MFL is saying go by your trucks RAWR on the door post. Your F350 SRW may show a 7000 rawr or 6730 rawr or 6290 rawr. example; If the scale show your trucks rear axle weighs 3120 lbs then subtract that from your trucks rawr number. This tells you how much payload any truck has. Its just that easy/simple.

Always weigh the trucks front and rear axles separately. Easiest way is a CAT scale in your area. Front axles carry little to no hitch weight so pay attention to your trucks RAWR numbers for your safe/legal payload limits.


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MikeRP

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Posted: 12/24/20 08:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My guess is the real payload on that truck will be over 4000 lbs since it’s a gasser. A lot of folks are proponents of staying w the GVWR on the fifth wheel.

Well many of the fifth wheels I’ve looked at can carry nearly two tons of cargo. If you are full timing, even then, 2 tons is a lot of stuff. Why carry that much? Most of it you won’t use.

For instance my Creek is 12800 lbs dry(2200 lbs pin),16,200 GVWR. So 3400 lbs of junk if you Max it out. We run about 14,500 lbs which is a reasonable 1700 lbs of junk.

I think you will be able to pull 12-13000 lbs comfortably w the 6.2l.

So look at fifth wheel with a lower pin weight dry.

Think about it: My Creek is 2200 dry. Another camper I looked at was 2500 dry.

That’s 300lbs. Doesn’t seem like much difference right? But 300 lbs on the pin is 1500 lbs in the front of the fifth wheel acting on the pin @20%. That’s my whole cargo almost.

Also if you start getting too much weight on the pin. Some fivers have a fresh water tank on a position that if you fill it up, it will counter act some of the pin weight.

That’s a very capable truck, combine it with some thought on purchase and load it properly and you’ll be fine.

spoon059

Just north of D.C.

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Posted: 12/25/20 07:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

noonenosthis1 wrote:

Well, that's interesting. We just got the registration notice and we do pay a weight penalty of 204.00.

What weight is it registered for with that extra charge?

My old Tundra had a GVWR of 7200 lbs I think. Maryland has a weight class of 7000 lbs (which means I would "lose" 200 lbs payload) or a weight class of 10000 lbs (which means I would "gain" 2800 lbs payload). I chose to register my Tundra for 10,000 lbs, which meant that LEGALLY I could carry a lot more weight going down the road. SAFELY is another issue, but LEGALLY I would be 100% able to.

Your F350 can SAFELY carry a GVWR of at least 11,500, provided your axle, wheel and tire ratings are up to the task. But if its only registered for 10,000 then you can't LEGALLY exceed that. Pay a little more for the higher weight rating and you are LEGALLY and SAFELY able to exceed that GVWR sticker.


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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 12/25/20 10:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

A registered weight is good only in your state. Some states may require a different weight like a gvw or gvwr or even a gcw or so many pounds of laden weight or other states like mine have no weight for registering our trucks. Just axle/tires for safe...


So you’re saying if you drive in a state that has weight based registration. With your Okie plates you are doing so illegally?
I’m about 99% sure that is incorrect, especially for personal use.


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blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

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Posted: 12/25/20 02:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit
Washington requires tonnage paid for truck based rigs, even personal use.
It would not surprise me if Jim came across the state line, no tonnage has been paid for the truck, they could fine and or tax him for the damage he is supposed to be paying for to the roads running down the road with more than just passengers in the truck.

Marty


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spoon059

Just north of D.C.

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Posted: 12/25/20 04:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

A registered weight is good only in your state.

What? This is completely untrue. Reciprocity means that your registration in one state is legal in all US states.

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 12/26/20 07:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

spoon059 wrote:

JIMNLIN wrote:

A registered weight is good only in your state.

What? This is completely untrue. Reciprocity means that your registration in one state is legal in all US states.

My state will not weigh a non commercial vehicle for a gross weight to see if your over that states registered weight period. Just axle/tire load numbers.
What my and other states recognize is the truck is registered legally by that state. Its legal registered to be driven every where.
Your weighted registration papers with lets say a 18000 gvw number doesn't mean jack shitz in my state.
Some members from the north east have said their state registers their trucks at a gcw.

Seem odd you guys can'y wrap your head around the fact not all state use a gvw number like your state, just to register a non commercial LDT.
If a state doesn't use any type of weight for registering a non commercial truck what type of weight numbers are used to determine a overloaded vehicle.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 12/26/20 09:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

blt2ski wrote:

Grit
Washington requires tonnage paid for truck based rigs, even personal use.
It would not surprise me if Jim came across the state line, no tonnage has been paid for the truck, they could fine and or tax him for the damage he is supposed to be paying for to the roads running down the road with more than just passengers in the truck.

Marty


Respectfully, like I said above, I’m 99% sure this is not the case. Especially for personal use. Can’t speak to commercial use as I’m not an expert on DOT regs, but light commercial I’ve never been aware of having to “call ahead “ during interstate travel.
Do the RV hotshotters stop in Spokane and pay the WA dmv tonnage?

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 12/26/20 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

spoon059 wrote:

JIMNLIN wrote:

A registered weight is good only in your state.

What? This is completely untrue. Reciprocity means that your registration in one state is legal in all US states.

My state will not weigh a non commercial vehicle for a gross weight to see if your over that states registered weight period. Just axle/tire load numbers.
What my and other states recognize is the truck is registered legally by that state. Its legal registered to be driven every where.
Your weighted registration papers with lets say a 18000 gvw number doesn't mean jack shitz in my state.
Some members from the north east have said their state registers their trucks at a gcw.

Seem odd you guys can'y wrap your head around the fact not all state use a gvw number like your state, just to register a non commercial LDT.
If a state doesn't use any type of weight for registering a non commercial truck what type of weight numbers are used to determine a overloaded vehicle.


I understand what you’re saying but what you typed first wasn’t what you meant then.
Because you just said the opposite
I grasp the fact that you register your pickup, legally , however that is in whatever state you register it in, and you can drive that truck in ANY state without worry about compliance with different state registration programs while driving in that state.

MFL

Midwest

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Posted: 12/26/20 09:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My state also does not weigh non-commercial, nor are they concerned with a LD truck, being used for personal use, that is over GVWR. In the case of an obvious overload, causing a danger on a public road, they will stop you. If way over axle rating, and tire rating, you likely will be fined, or not allowed to continue driving.

Jerry





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