Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Breaking down and smoking a turkey?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Camp Cooks and Connoisseurs

Open Roads Forum  >  Camp Cooks and Connoisseurs

 > Breaking down and smoking a turkey?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Leo Benson

CT

Senior Member

Joined: 04/30/2003

View Profile



Posted: 12/30/20 05:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi, I have an extra Thanksgiving turkey defrosting in the refrigerator. I’d like to smoke it in my small propane smoker. Any advice? I need to break it down, never done that before but there’s plenty of you tubes. I’ve got a variety of wood chips, all kinds of stuff for a dry rub, beer, wine, apple juice I can use in the pan.
I’d be grateful for any tips.
Thanks!

Y-Guy

Tri-Cities, WA

Moderator

Joined: 03/04/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 08:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've never used a propane smoker, only a pellet smoker so your mileage may vary.
I always (always) brine my turkey for at least 24 hours. IMHO doesn't matter what brine you use but its a must do for me. The Traeger Orange Brine and Turkey Rub kit is good, but Costco has one and spice island turkey brine kit worked well for us too.

Day of my smoke I drain the turkey, pat it down well. Put some rub (I like the
McCormick Smokehouse Maple Seasoning) use about 2 table spoons to coat the cavity, the more outside. Also separate the skin from the meat and spread butter around. Sometimes I mix the butter in with seasoning. Letting it rest in the fridge for an hour is nice but honestly I've only done it a few times.

Then I fire up the smoker and set the "Smoke" or about 180-225° generally for about 4 hours or until you hit about 110° internal temperature, then increase the smoker to 350° until your internal temp reaches 160° - depending on your setup the total time on the grill might be 4 hours, I just don't know enough about a propane smoker to help on that aspect.

Good luck & enjoy!


2007 Winnebago Sightseer 35J
2011 Jeep Wrangler

dedmiston

The West

Moderator

Joined: 01/26/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 12/30/20 08:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I respect Y-Guy as a cook and a smoker, and I don't disagree with his method. I do mine differently though.

I cut the backbone out of mine and flatten it out for more even cooking. It's called Spatchcock style, and you can find plenty of YouTube videos for instructions. Picture the way they grill the birds at El Pollo Loco.

I do mine at 325* to get crispier skin.

I use Susie Bulloch's pork/chicken run recipe and absolutely love it.

https://heygrillhey.com/best-sweet-rub-grilled-pork-chicken/

* This post was edited 12/30/20 08:56am by dedmiston *


2014 RAM 3500 Diesel 4x4 Dually long bed. AISIN trans & 4.10 rear. B&W RVK3600 hitch • 2015 Crossroads Elevation Homestead Toy Hauler ("The Taj Mahauler") • Hooligan #3

Toys:
  • 18 Can Am Maverick x3
  • 05 Yamaha WR450
  • 07 Honda CRF250X
  • 05 Honda CRF230
  • 06 Honda CRF230



gkainz

Arvada, CO, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 10/02/2004

View Profile



Posted: 12/30/20 08:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Do you need to break it down because of smoker rack size? Consider spatchcocking the bird if you can fit it in your smoker. Everything lays flat and gets even smoke and heat.
Also, I smoke poultry as hot as I can get my smoker - ignoring the smoker's mantra of "everything low and slow". Basically, I'm oven roasting birds in my smoker. Eliminates the rubbery skin problem and produces a nice crispy skin.
I can easily get 325-350° in both my wood fired and propane fired smokers.


'07 Ram 2500 CTD 4x4 Quad Cab
'10 Keystone Laredo 245 5er

Vintage465

Prunedale CA.

Senior Member

Joined: 05/02/2015

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 08:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Y-Guy wrote:

I've never used a propane smoker, only a pellet smoker so your mileage may vary.
I always (always) brine my turkey for at least 24 hours. IMHO doesn't matter what brine you use but its a must do for me. The Traeger Orange Brine and Turkey Rub kit is good, but Costco has one and spice island turkey brine kit worked well for us too.

Day of my smoke I drain the turkey, pat it down well. Put some rub (I like the
McCormick Smokehouse Maple Seasoning) use about 2 table spoons to coat the cavity, the more outside. Also separate the skin from the meat and spread butter around. Sometimes I mix the butter in with seasoning. Letting it rest in the fridge for an hour is nice but honestly I've only done it a few times.


Then I fire up the smoker and set the "Smoke" or about 180-225° generally for about 4 hours or until you hit about 110° internal temperature, then increase the smoker to 350° until your internal temp reaches 160° - depending on your setup the total time on the grill might be 4 hours, I just don't know enough about a propane smoker to help on that aspect.

Good luck & enjoy!


There would be little I could add to this. Be certain your brine is real cold, like ice cold or in a fridge over night. I make my own simple brine with 1/2 cup salt 1/4 cup sugar and 1 cup soy sauce. Kinda fun to add some fresh garlic smashed up and maybe some rosemary. Brining is real important to the great flavor of a smoked turkey as the salt penetrates the meat it takes water with it and that keeps it real moist at the time of completion as well as enhancing the flavor. I never need to "part the bird out" but breaking down the turkey shouldn't be to difficult if it's thawed. Just cut at the joints. I would prolly separate the back...then cut the bird in half and brine it along with the back. If you remove the leg/thigh from the carcass it will cook easier but you will lose a certain amount of moisture that way. If you do the brine above wiht chicken overnight and smoked whole, the results are outrageous.
Have fun!


V-465
2013 GMC 2500HD Duramax Denali. 2015 CreekSide 20fq w/450 watts solar and 465 amp/hour of batteries. Retired and living the dream!

theoldwizard1

SE MI

Senior Member

Joined: 09/07/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 10:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As for "breaking down", just remove the thighs, legs and wings. You can put them on ice and do them as the second batch.

I have smoked whole turkeys in a full sized Weber Kettle Grill. The trick is to find the special charcoal holders that hold it over to the side.

I have not brined/soaked it pre-smoking, nor have I applied any rub. I am smoking rookie, so I probably had the grill too hot for a true smoking. If you do use a kettle with side charcoal holders, watch how fast the coals burn. You will probably have to add more and it the old ones have burned very low, it is hard to get the additional ones lit.

DO NOT STUFF YOUR TURKEY ! The stuffing picks up too much of the smoke taste.

Super_Dave

Harrisville, UT

Senior Member

Joined: 01/19/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 12:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are close to a market, my mom used to take the bird to the meat department and they would split the bird on the bandsaw.

I like to brine the bird at the ratio of 45 mins - 60 mins per pound. I've found that going longer changes the texture of the meat for the worse.


Truck: 2006 Dodge 3500 Dually
Rig: 2018 Big Country 3155 RLK
Boat: 21' North River Seahawk


Super_Dave

Harrisville, UT

Senior Member

Joined: 01/19/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 12:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just my opinion but slow smoking poultry is a huge waste of time. There is no muscle tissue to breakdown. Smoke at 250 degrees or above for me. And like oven roasting, use a meat thermometer to prevent over cooking and a dry bird.

Tal/IL

Central Illinois

Senior Member

Joined: 03/24/2016

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 02:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I do a lot of turkeys for us and for others in either a charcoal grill, pellet smoker, or wood fired smoker. We haven't cooked a turkey in an oven in decades.

I always do turkeys at 300 - 325 degrees with hickory smoke.

I never bother with brining, unless someone wants that salt and brown sugar cure flavor. Nearly all frozen turkeys are already injected with brine at 8 - 10 %. Read the fine print on the packaging and you will see something like this, which is from Butterball packaging:

"Ingredients: Whole Young Turkey Contains up to 8% of a solution of water, salt, spices and natural flavor."

Realized I didn't address breaking down the bird. If it fits in the smoker, even if it's a tight fit, I'd cook it whole. The bird below just barely fit in a Davy Crockett smoker.

Also, here is a link to cooking a turkey in a Weber style grill..

[image]

* This post was edited 12/30/20 02:56pm by Tal/IL *


35 miles from Normal, IL. As close to normal as I'll ever be.

2006 Country Coach Inspire Genoa 40ft


garmp

St Louis, MO

Senior Member

Joined: 02/16/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/20 02:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When making your brine add about a good 1/3 to 1/2 a fifth of cheap bourbon. Not necessarily the cheapest bourbon as you might want to sip on it during the cook.


Our 2351D Phoenix Cruiser, Jack, has turned us from campers into RVers and loving it!


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Camp Cooks and Connoisseurs

 > Breaking down and smoking a turkey?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Camp Cooks and Connoisseurs


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.