Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: CONDENSATION on windows in winter
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > CONDENSATION on windows in winter

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
ORbiker

Springfield, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 02/17/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 01/31/21 12:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are drying out gear, cooking and showering; there will be airborne moisture. We camped at Crater Lake and Gold Lake Sno-park doing x-country ski patrol in our pick-up camper. The shower was the drying room and the bathroom vent was open. The heat was on extra warm to help the moisture go out the vent. Sometimes we would have the camper lower window open too to help with the air flow; plus a small fan running.
There still might be some moisture on the window, but most of the moisture is going out the vent.
Ski safe, Have Fun. KEN


Backpacker and tent camper all my life. Motorcycle trips with a tent too 1978 to Present. 2016 Grand Design 380TH as of 10-29-2015. Now a New 2018 374TH-R Solitude as of 3-16-19. 10-19-18-traded truck for a 2016 Ram 3500 DRW Laramie Crew Cab 4x4 Long Box.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/18/2004

View Profile


Online
Posted: 01/31/21 12:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

I assume the humidity is much lower outside so it might seem counter intuitive but you may benefit from cracking a window or two open.


Since we measure relative humidity, it is actually higher outside. When the air is brought inside and raised in temperature it becomes dramatically drier. That is why opening a roof vent a bit and the window farthest from the vent works to lower the RH. It works even better if there is some shore power to run an electric heater near the window.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

Senior Member

Joined: 09/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 01/31/21 07:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WE lived in a 29' 5th wheel trailer for one winter. Temps here in the plains down to single digits below zero with constant winds.
This trailer was the typical summer camper with R7 insulation all around. The unit had the super slide along with 11 big summer time single pane windows.... and the door.
Anyone thinking sweat is just cosmetic has no clue what the trailer looks like after a 6 months of full time living with sweating issues. Black and green algae plus wet stained interior wood and interior paneling.

Cracking a vent/windows just created a cold drafty camper and did nothing for interior sweating issues.
Three 10" 110v fans ran all day/nite also did nothing but make a cold damp drafty camper.

We were permanent so adding mobile home skirting around the bottom was a big help with the cold.
I used 1/8" Lexan for inside storm windows. No more sweat from all the glass. Dried that issue up.
Bought a dehumidifier which helped a bunch with sweating walls but still left the closets wet.
Talked with a snow birder guy at my RV dealer about the issue. He had three dehumidifier in his 38' Mobile Suites...so I bough a 2nd bigger one and finally after 4 months we had finally fixed the sweat issue for this particular rig.

Some folks think what works for them will work for all others. It just don't work that way.

Most of what I did was recommendations from full timers who winter here.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

'03 2500 QC Dodge/Cummins HO 3.73 6 speed manual Jacobs Westach
'97 Park Avanue 28' 5er 11200 two slides

Guy Roan

Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 09/04/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/31/21 08:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I

* This post was edited 02/02/21 05:19pm by Guy Roan *

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/18/2004

View Profile


Online
Posted: 01/31/21 09:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN,

Sweating is because the surface is below the dew point temperature.

Gdetrailer

PA

Senior Member

Joined: 01/05/2007

View Profile



Posted: 01/31/21 10:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skinny D wrote:

Thanks for all the experienced folk who weighed in here.

The indoor humidity is about 48% to 62%, but I don't have a meter that gives the 24 hr high/ low.

I should clarify the reason that I care. It's not the cosmetics of beads on the window and it's not concern for damage to the TT. We are in the snowy mountains for skiing, and we have lots of wet gear at the end of the day that needs to dry out before the next morning. I'm concerned that the accumulated moisture on the window will just be eventually returned to the air and my clothes/boots won't dry as well (starting a ski day in wet gear is not ideal). So, I'd like that window moisture to be discarded somehow or redirected to the dehumidifier.

The window covering option seems best (creating double pane windows) but this seems permanent? Do you remove and re-apply it each year for the different seasons? Is there no "super sponge" option for wiping windows and collecting that condensate?


As I mentioned, there is built in "drains" in the windows, they are hidden from view, moisture collects on the window surface then rolls down to the bottom.. At the bottom of the window there is a couple of well hidden drains that send the moisture to the outside of the frame.

Take a close look at the outside of the window frame, you should see two plastic "covers" at the bottom of the frames.. Those are the drain points.

You should not have to "mop" the moisture at the bottom of the window frame unless the drains are clogged..

Drains are there to help redirect any moisture that gets past the window slide gaskets in heavy rains..

Won't hurt to mop it but not really needed..

Damp clothing/gear however can be an issue and makes the inside humidity more of a problem to deal with.

Keep in mind, if it wasn't for the windows collecting moisture, EVERYTHING ELSE would condense and collect the moisture.. It is not unheard of to have moisture dripping from ceiling or running down the walls and that is what you want to avoid.

Dehumidifiers can only help so much and they tend to not work effectively once the ambient air temps drop below 70F due to freeze ups of the condensing coils.. Granted most expensive dehumidifiers have a freeze sensor but when that trips it is too late and you end up with a solid block of ice on the coils blocking the fan. That ice has to melt so the compressor turns off and the fan runs until the ice melts and falls off the coils.. Wasting a lot of time and electricity..

To myself, it seems if the clothing and gear is the big issue then you need a way to dry those items before putting into the RV for the night.. RVs typically are not designed to cope with huge amounts of moisture. RV washer/driers tend to be pretty small and inefficient for drying..

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

Senior Member

Joined: 09/14/2003

View Profile



Posted: 01/31/21 02:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

The window covering option seems best (creating double pane windows) but this seems permanent? Do you remove and re-apply it each year for the different seasons? Is there no "super sponge" option for wiping windows and collecting that condensate?

The wife would wipe a window but a hour later she would have to do it again.
I made mine removable with 1/4" X 3/4" long hex head screws and stored them in the big closet across the front of the trailer.
Never used them again as we had our belly full of winter issues in a camper. This is COE lake country around here so not much winter camping with most good campgrounds closed.

Also open flame with LP like the stove/oven creates more moisture in the air.

AS I stated above their is no single silver bullet that kills condensation in a RV trailer. Now if they were all the same as my unit was and had the same work everyday schedule...then what I did would work for all.
Like everyone else your gonna' have to try different scenarios and see what works for your unit at that location. Good luck [emoticon]

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 01/31/21 02:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

...so I bough a 2nd bigger one and finally after 4 months we had finally fixed the sweat issue for this particular rig.
Possibly we underestimate the size of the problem in this small enclosed space. Easiest to justify purchasing the smaller less expensive model and see how it goes. Apparently it is best to go a bit larger with more features.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

spoon059

Just north of D.C.

Senior Member

Joined: 10/03/2010

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 01/31/21 04:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP, sounds like you don't have electricity but if you do I might suggest electric heaters. They will dry the air as they heat, helping with condensation. We don't cold weather camp as often now tat we have small kids, but used to winter camp all the time. Our little 22' camper only needed a single 1500 watt heater to keep cozy and dry.


2015 Ram CTD
2015 Jayco 29QBS

JBarca

Radnor, Ohio, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/16/2004

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 01/31/21 06:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skinny D wrote:


snip...

The indoor humidity is about 48% to 62%, but I don't have a meter that gives the 24 hr high/ low.

I should clarify the reason that I care. It's not the cosmetics of beads on the window and it's not concern for damage to the TT. We are in the snowy mountains for skiing, and we have lots of wet gear at the end of the day that needs to dry out before the next morning. I'm concerned that the accumulated moisture on the window will just be eventually returned to the air and my clothes/boots won't dry as well (starting a ski day in wet gear is not ideal). So, I'd like that window moisture to be discarded somehow or redirected to the dehumidifier.

The window covering option seems best (creating double pane windows) but this seems permanent? Do you remove and re-apply it each year for the different seasons? Is there no "super sponge" option for wiping windows and collecting that condensate?


If you go the shrink wrap option on the windows, yes, you do remove it annually "if" you want those particular windows to open.

We leave ours on for as long as we can. The weather in the mid-west is totally unpredictable. The plastic film helps on spring campouts, so leave it on. Come summer, the weather can go super hot, high humidity overnight it seems. If the film is still on by then, and we use the AC, we leave the film on. It helps keep the AC air in and not let so much heat in. When we go boondocking under tree cover in the summer, then we want the windows open so the film comes off which is quick to do. It does take time later to clean off the little left over tape residue. If you never want to open a window, you can leave it on as long as you want. That said, after about 3 years the tape may start coming loose or you knocked it and it broke loose.

The plastic film greatly helps keep the heat in, during the cooler weather, and it stops the sweat. If you do a lot of cool weather camping, the heat savings and dry windows makes it worth it for us. The cost of the film, is about $13.00 for our 32 ft camper. And we do not use all of it from the 2 kits. It does take time to put it on though.

High humidity does create mold and rusted screws/metal in the camper attic. It is something to be concerned about if you plan on keeping the camper a long time. Just 2 people camping in those conditions is enough of an issue for the attic molding/rusting problem to be there as the years go by. Adding attic vents, does help this and lowers the camper inside humidity. Trying to dry out wet heavy cloths makes it harder to keep the humidity down. For sure, try and help the problem with high humidly.

On the window frame drains, not all camper windows have drains. If the window opens, then yes odds are high it has drains from leaking water from the seals on the opening window. If you have windows that do not open, like a big picture window, entry door windows or some slide room end wall windows, odds are high, that style window does not have drains.

Good luck and let us know what you come up with.

John

* This post was edited 01/31/21 10:52pm by JBarca *


John & Cindy

2005 Ford F350 Super Duty, 4x4; 6.8L V10 with 4.10
CC, SB, Lariat & FX4 package
21,000 GCWR, 11,000 GVWR
Ford Tow Command
1,700# Reese HP hitch & HP Dual Cam
2 1/2" Towbeast Receiver

2004 Sunline Solaris T310SR
(I wish we were camping!)


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > CONDENSATION on windows in winter
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.