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Open Roads Forum  >  Full-time RVing

 > Fantasizing, I suppose

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bucky

Raleigh metro

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Posted: 02/03/21 02:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some smaller units have a sofa/murphy bed combo that might work for you.


2005 Cummins 3500 2WD LB quad cab dually pulling a 2014 Blue Ridge 3025RL


gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 02/03/21 03:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I can't help you on picking the best rig for your needs. You'll figure that out fairly quickly.
I can say that when the time comes for you to go, don't put it off. Go enjoy yourself while you are able.
You don't know what life will hand you tomorrow.
Enjoy your travels.

valhalla360

No paticular place.

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Posted: 02/03/21 05:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

First of all, Tacoma tow ratings range from 3500 to 6800 lb. As a general rule of thumb, it's good to keep your trailer at no more than 80-90% of max. Payloads go up to 1440 lb but not all are like that for sure. So get the exact specs on your specific vehicle before choosing a trailer.


There's no reason not to tow up to the trucks limit. The manufacturers already include safety margins. The catch is the "payload" is often reached before the "tow rating" effectively limiting you to less than the tow rating.

From your post, it sounds like you don't have a truck yet. A V6 F-150 can have upwards of 385hp (ecoboost 3.5). When you pick one, get one with a higher payload rating (I'd look for at least 2000lb). That will give you a truck that should be able to tow up into the 7-8,000lb range. You don't need to get a trailer that big but if you are buying, no reason to buy a weak truck.

For a single guy, I would look into something in the 18-22ft range. You can find plenty of options. One thing to look at is the newer rigs have started switching to a 12v fridge (from the old propane 3way). Ours has a little 50w solar panel to help keep the fridge going off shore power but for longer term boondocking, you will want to add a second battery and a larger panel (we are currently working so haven't had a good chance to utilize it boondocking yet)


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
Gemini Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and RV


Tvov

CT

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Posted: 02/03/21 05:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

....

For full timing, IMHO the main thing you WON'T find in a small trailer is a comfortable place to sit. Dinettes suck for that, and the other option is the bed. Consider getting a used trailer (with careful inspection) and don't be afraid to modify it to suit your needs. A single recliner with a straight chair and small work table is a good combo for a single person.


This is basically what I was going to post.

And what about a shower? Are you happy with a "wet bath" for an extended trip?

The trailer we have now, 21 foot with wrap around dinette in front that drops to make a queen size bed, is pretty darn nice for one or two people. My major modification to it for long distance / extended living would be to remove the rear bunks and make a sitting/eating area with a comfortable chair... which would make the drop down dinette essentially a permanent bed.

My 3 big "things" for extended use with a camper would be: 1. comfortable bed, 2. easy to use shower and toilet (large enough for a large person like me), 3. comfortable place to sit.

I find it enjoyable to plan / think about stuff like this.

Have fun!


_________________________________________________________
2008 F-250 CrewCab 5.4L,
2004 21' Forest River Surveyor


JimK-NY

NY

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Posted: 02/03/21 07:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

First, don't skimp on the truck. I would go with a 150/1500 truck set up for towing. Depending on the specs you can pull over 10K pounds. Having some excess capacity is great for longevity, for safety and you will be really happy to have more power towing in mountain country.

I cannot help with the trailer size or brands since my wife and I full timed in a truck camper, not a trailer. I can make a few general recommendations. Be sure the trailer has good tires and suspension. Many are poorly made and just not up to what is needed. Modifications and accessories can add a lot of weight. Personal gear including food can quickly add another 1000#.

I highly recommend a cassette toilet. They use minimal water and you can dump in outhouses or other places when dump stations are not available. You will also want to save weight and space with a wet bath. One minute with a squeegee will do a remarkable job of drying the area.

Look for a unit with relatively large fresh water capacity. I have learned to take a shower with 1 gallon and get by for everything else with another 2 gallons a day. You will want an absolute minimum of 15-20 gallons of fresh water. Next look at battery capacity and solar. You cannot have too much and a minimum for me would be a couple of batteries and a couple of panels.

bluedogz1

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Posted: 02/03/21 08:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

the main thing you WON'T find in a small trailer is a comfortable place to sit. Dinettes suck for that, and the other option is the bed.


RIGHT!! Many moons ago I had a 16' Sunline, and the "dinette" was barely usable.

A solution I hadn't thought of (thank you, Slim Potatohead!) was having an outdoor screened structure. That plus umbrella chairs/table seems like a solution for longer stops.

Something I might not have made clear... everyone who suggested a larger unit is right that they are more comfortable etc. I live a minimalist lifestyle that really could fit nicely in a Casita/A-liner or similar. Part of the motivation for this whole exercise is, as I mentioned, "screw this I'm out." Therefore, the less "stuff" the better.

-Can I live with a wet bath? Yeah, till I get to a truck stop or campground with proper showers.
- I've used cassette toilets and think they're just the thing for this purpose. Also, I have no concern making like a bear in the woods when it's appropriate.

The general principles some folks have shared are awesome! Can't have too much tow vehicle, for example.

* This post was edited 02/03/21 08:55am by bluedogz1 *

theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 02/03/21 09:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LadyRVer wrote:

Casita, Scamp, Oliver, R-Pod....

I am a big fan of "eggshell" campers. They seem more "durable" when compared to anything else.

They are small (toilet and shower are required for myself). For a bit more room, look into a 5th wheel Scamp. Dry weight is still under 3000 lbs.

theoldwizard1

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Posted: 02/03/21 09:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

I highly recommend a cassette toilet. They use minimal water and you can dump in outhouses or other places when dump stations are not available.

CONCUR ! Not having a black tank is one less thing to worry about !

One thing I am surprised at is that no "eggshell" manufacturers have dropped propane ! A couple of LiFePO4 batteries, solar panels, an inverter and a small generator would cover everything. Cold weather camping would require an electric heater and power (not battery or generator), but A/C has the same requirement.

theoldwizard1

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Posted: 02/03/21 09:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bluedogz1 wrote:

A solution I hadn't thought of is having an outdoor screened structure.

Very useful with some folding chairs.

Most eggshell campers do not have awning so this cover that also.

bluedogz1

Dallas, TX

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Posted: 02/03/21 01:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

A couple of LiFePO4 batteries, solar panels, an inverter and a small generator would cover everything. Cold weather camping would require an electric heater and power (not battery or generator), but A/C has the same requirement.


How does cooking get done in this case?

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