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ReneeG

Meridian, Idaho

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Posted: 02/15/21 08:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

ReneeG wrote:

I believe the gasser doesn't have the Tow Haul mode where you can tap the breaks and slow it down like diesels. When we had a V10 truck and towed a travel trailer, we had to do the slow lane with the semi's and slow it way down, then pump the brakes at the end to keep them from seizing up.


Our 2008 F250 V10 does and it works great. It would be shocking if a much newer MH doesn't.

I believe what you are thinking of is an exhaust brake. Since a diesel doesn't have a throttle to choke off, it gets very little engine braking effect. An exhaust brake has as similar effect but works by restricting the exhaust rather than the inlet. This is common on most newer diesels.

Worst case, if it doesn't, just manually downshift for a similar effect.


Well, I learned something new. We had a 1999 V10 F250. No tow/ haul mode, but when we bought our 2011 F350 diesel, it came with a tow/ haul mode and a tap of the break slows it down.


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ssthrd

Vancouver Island

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Posted: 02/15/21 09:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Be prepared for the hills by being in the right gear just before going up/down steep slopes.

If you have to downshift on a steep downhill grade, be aware that your rear tires may drag on a slippery road surface which could be tense if the rear end starts to pass you. Ask me how I know........... Parking might be the best course of action if the roads are slippery.

Just take it easy, and you will have no problems. IMO, the biggest thing is to know your vehicle and how it reacts to your steering/braking input.


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DrewE

Vermont

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Posted: 02/15/21 11:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For climbing hills, don't be afraid to push the V10 and let it rev up. Its powerband is at relatively high RPMs, and it's perfectly capable of running there for quite some time, even if it sounds like it's a giant over-caffeinated bumble bee thrashing about.

ReneeG wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:


Our 2008 F250 V10 does and it works great. It would be shocking if a much newer MH doesn't.


Well, I learned something new. We had a 1999 V10 F250. No tow/ haul mode, but when we bought our 2011 F350 diesel, it came with a tow/ haul mode and a tap of the break slows it down.


It depends on the transmission (and that depends on the year of the vehicle). The four speed Ford transmission did not have tow/haul, and the button on the shifter is correctly labeled "O/D off". The 5 speed and newer transmissions do have tow/haul instead, and it works well.

A motorhome is always hauling, even if it's not towing, since it's a heavy load and a lot of air resistance. As such, it's not at all unreasonable to always use tow/haul mode if you have it.





georgelesley

Tennessee

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Posted: 02/16/21 05:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ReneeG wrote:

I believe the gasser doesn't have the Tow Haul mode where you can tap the breaks and slow it down like diesels. When we had a V10 truck and towed a travel trailer, we had to do the slow lane with the semi's and slow it way down, then pump the brakes at the end to keep them from seizing up.


Our V-10 gasser does indeed have the tow haul that does downshift with brake taps. Best thing the OP can do is learn to use and live the tow haul feature. Also important to start the down grade at a slow safe speed, not fast.


George & Lesley
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valhalla360

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Posted: 02/16/21 05:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ReneeG wrote:

Well, I learned something new. We had a 1999 V10 F250. No tow/ haul mode, but when we bought our 2011 F350 diesel, it came with a tow/ haul mode and a tap of the break slows it down.


Had a 1992 with the 7.3 diesel...Naturally Aspirated (no turbo) or exhaust brake. On flat land it was great. Awesome MPG. In the mountains, it was a total pig. Going up mountains it would lose lots of power at altitude and it didn't like lots of RPM (unlike the V10). Going downhill, it offered no engine or exhaust braking.


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ReneeG

Meridian, Idaho

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Posted: 02/16/21 06:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DrewE wrote:

For climbing hills, don't be afraid to push the V10 and let it rev up. Its powerband is at relatively high RPMs, and it's perfectly capable of running there for quite some time, even if it sounds like it's a giant over-caffeinated bumble bee thrashing about.

ReneeG wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:


Our 2008 F250 V10 does and it works great. It would be shocking if a much newer MH doesn't.


Well, I learned something new. We had a 1999 V10 F250. No tow/ haul mode, but when we bought our 2011 F350 diesel, it came with a tow/ haul mode and a tap of the break slows it down.


It depends on the transmission (and that depends on the year of the vehicle). The four speed Ford transmission did not have tow/haul, and the button on the shifter is correctly labeled "O/D off". The 5 speed and newer transmissions do have tow/haul instead, and it works well.

A motorhome is always hauling, even if it's not towing, since it's a heavy load and a lot of air resistance. As such, it's not at all unreasonable to always use tow/haul mode if you have it.


Our F250 V10 was a 6.8L.

valhalla360

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Posted: 02/16/21 07:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ReneeG wrote:

Our F250 V10 was a 6.8L.


I believe the ford V10 was always 6.8L. They had different valve configurations and some other things but displacement was pretty much constant.

When I mentioned the 7.3L Diesel it was referring to the older Ford Diesel which is a V8 and untreated to the V10 other than both went into Fords.

Dale.Traveling

Newport News, VA

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Posted: 02/16/21 09:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ssthrd wrote:

Be prepared for the hills by being in the right gear just before going up/down steep slopes.,,,


Best advice yet. Start out slow and get in a low gear before drop over the crest of a descent. Hit the top of a 3 mile, 8% grade at 65 MPH and your going to have problems getting the speed down later.

Best way to learn and get a feel is to stick with the 18 wheelers for climbs and descent. As a beginner I would advise you to manually downshift for now. Play with the auto shift on the gentler descents. For the climbs keep the RPM up, as high as 4500 RPM, on the climbs. The high RMP has the engine coolant/oil and transmission oil moving at a high rate which helps to keep both cool. The engine is electronically limited to 5250 RPM and won't let you do anything that will exceed that number including manual down shifts.

If you do have to brake be aggressive and get the speed down fast then get off the breaks to allow them to cool. Long soft braking should be avoided as you want to avoid - THIS


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FloridaRosebud

Melbourne

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Posted: 02/16/21 11:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dale.Traveling wrote:

ssthrd wrote:

Be prepared for the hills by being in the right gear just before going up/down steep slopes.,,,


Best advice yet. Start out slow and get in a low gear before drop over the crest of a descent. Hit the top of a 3 mile, 8% grade at 65 MPH and your going to have problems getting the speed down later.

Best way to learn and get a feel is to stick with the 18 wheelers for climbs and descent. As a beginner I would advise you to manually downshift for now. Play with the auto shift on the gentler descents. For the climbs keep the RPM up, as high as 4500 RPM, on the climbs. The high RMP has the engine coolant/oil and transmission oil moving at a high rate which helps to keep both cool. The engine is electronically limited to 5250 RPM and won't let you do anything that will exceed that number including manual down shifts.

If you do have to brake be aggressive and get the speed down fast then get off the breaks to allow them to cool. Long soft braking should be avoided as you want to avoid - THIS


Agree....this is great advice. I learned going down the grade on I-77 going from VA to NC....not 8%, but steep enough. The first time I could smell the brakes at the bottom. The next year I started slow, had the tow/haul on, and was MUCH easier and less stressful.

Al

btilfan

springfield NE

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Posted: 02/16/21 11:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As a flatlander (Nebraska) my whole life I too worried about mountain driving. Just follow the advice on this thread and you'll be fine. Up is easy just keep it slow and let the tranny find the gear. going down keep it slow and use lower gear, in most cased just turning off the overdrive will do it. set a speed you don't want to exceed, in my case it was 40 - 45. then when you get to that speed brake hard to about 25 - 30 and repeat. I have now driven I80 and I70 both directions at least 4 times from Omaha to west coast in a gasser and enjoy doing it.


2007 Damon Astoria Pacifica
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