Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Beginning RVing: Navigation
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Beginning RVing

Open Roads Forum  >  Beginning RVing

 > Navigation

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
MarkTwain

Northern, Ca. , USA

Senior Member

Joined: 07/26/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/18/21 11:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use the Dezi 770 mthd for Trucker. The best feature is the large display screen which is easy to ready as you are driving on highway.

PawPaw_n_Gram

On the Road Somewhere

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2012

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 02/18/21 11:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Navigation starts with a map. Knowing where you plan to go, what route you should take.

I use apps like AllStays, RV Trip Wizard (PC Only), RV Parky, and state DOT websites to check for obstructions, construction, etc.

Then I put the route I want to take into two different GPS units to monitor while driving. I've been too many places where Google Maps gave up and could not figure out where I was. Well out of cell phone range also. I want a stand alone device.

My route is written down on paper, so my wife and look quickly at tell me that we need to turn on County Road 123.

No GPS or Google Maps or app had a ROUTE for you to travel. It chooses a route based on waypoints, and the friggin things can change their minds for all kinds of reasons.

I use a Rand McNally RV GPS for monitoring my planned route, set to show me what the road looks like for the next mile. It is set to NOT recalculate if I miss a turn. (I also use the Rand for maintenance logs, fuel purchase logs, etc.).

I use a Garming RV GPS set to auto-recalculate to monitor traffic, weather, such.

Before I leave, I step through the route turn by turn, to make sure I NEVER face an unexpected roadway.

I also usually know which places I will refuel. Mostly a specific station, sometimes, just in a particular town.

If something forces us to change, or I get a wild hair to go someplace else, DW can reprogram the Garmin for a new waypoint or destination.

She is also quite practiced at using RV Parky and AllStays to find new campgrounds or places to stop overnight.

Yes, I'm an old fart with no job, so I can play with routes, optimize them for the way my truck and trailer travel. Even without internet. I have a highly customized copy of Streets & Trips 2013. True it doesn't show every roadway or changes.

A few times, we got an early start, the drive was easy, and I've stretched my destination a bit. Once all the way from Decatur Texas to Albuquerque, another time from Decatur to Tatum, NM.

Mostly I plan for less than 300 miles a day travel. It's about the journey for us, and that leaves us options to stop and smell the bluebonnets.

Of course, I've been doing this for seven years, and I pull a TT which is relatively low as far as height compared to many other rigs. But it is a total of 62 feet long, with a very large turn radius, more than a Class A or almost all 5ers.


Full-Time 2014 - ????

“Not all who wander are lost.”
"You were supposed to turn back at the last street."

2012 Ram 2500 Mega Cab
2014 Flagstaff 832IKBS TT


hornet28

Muskegon Mi.

Senior Member

Joined: 07/27/2017

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/18/21 12:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Many times I like to just head in a general direction. That's exceptionally easy here in Michigans lower peninsula. Too far west and there's Lake Michigan, going east it's I-75 or lake Huron, north Mackinac Bridge. It can be very interesting just winging it enroute.
For long trips out of state, get an idea of your route by using maps or Google Earth beforehand. A few years ago I was in Oklahoma City and my gps hadn't been updated for a bit. I was traveling on an expressway that the gps didn't know and it kept telling me I was offroad, but I had acquainted my self with the area I was going. When I got to me destination I asked and that highway was less than a year old





Allworth

Orlando, FL

Senior Member

Joined: 10/10/2006

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/18/21 12:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In 8 years we have never had a failure with Rand-McNally's RVND (Recreational Vehicle Navigation Device) Although it has missed a couple of low clearances.

I do also carry the most recent edition of The R-M spiral bound Trucker's Road Atlas.


Formerly posting as "littleblackdog"
Martha, Allen, & Blackjack
2006 Chevy 3500 D/A LB SRW, RVND 7710
2008 Titanium 30E35SA; EZ-Lube axles; wet bolts; spring hanger gussetts; BFG Commercial TAs
"Real Jeeps have round headlights"

Green Goblin

Minneapolis

New Member

Joined: 02/18/2021

View Profile



Posted: 02/18/21 01:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PawPaw_n_Gram wrote:

Navigation starts with a map. Knowing where you plan to go, what route you should take.

I use apps like AllStays, RV Trip Wizard (PC Only), RV Parky, and state DOT websites to check for obstructions, construction, etc.

Then I put the route I want to take into two different GPS units to monitor while driving. I've been too many places where Google Maps gave up and could not figure out where I was. Well out of cell phone range also. I want a stand alone device.

My route is written down on paper, so my wife and look quickly at tell me that we need to turn on County Road 123.

No GPS or Google Maps or app had a ROUTE for you to travel. It chooses a route based on waypoints, and the friggin things can change their minds for all kinds of reasons.

I use a Rand McNally RV GPS for monitoring my planned route, set to show me what the road looks like for the next mile. It is set to NOT recalculate if I miss a turn. (I also use the Rand for maintenance logs, fuel purchase logs, etc.).

I use a Garming RV GPS set to auto-recalculate to monitor traffic, weather, such.

Before I leave, I step through the route turn by turn, to make sure I NEVER face an unexpected roadway.

I also usually know which places I will refuel. Mostly a specific station, sometimes, just in a particular town.

If something forces us to change, or I get a wild hair to go someplace else, DW can reprogram the Garmin for a new waypoint or destination.

She is also quite practiced at using RV Parky and AllStays to find new campgrounds or places to stop overnight.

Yes, I'm an old fart with no job, so I can play with routes, optimize them for the way my truck and trailer travel. Even without internet. I have a highly customized copy of Streets & Trips 2013. True it doesn't show every roadway or changes.

A few times, we got an early start, the drive was easy, and I've stretched my destination a bit. Once all the way from Decatur Texas to Albuquerque, another time from Decatur to Tatum, NM.

Mostly I plan for less than 300 miles a day travel. It's about the journey for us, and that leaves us options to stop and smell the bluebonnets.

Of course, I've been doing this for seven years, and I pull a TT which is relatively low as far as height compared to many other rigs. But it is a total of 62 feet long, with a very large turn radius, more than a Class A or almost all 5ers.



You know PawPaw this is probably the best advice I have received. We forget a lot about these options when we become reliant on a car gps or our phone. I went old school with a 2008 F250 Superduty out of AZ. A retired forestry truck with no frills. Laymen everything. I want to slow down, think, not react. Keep my eyes on the road and surroundings. A paper map can tell us a lot if we stop and look at it. With knowledge of mpg and capabilities I can plan ahead by about 100-150 miles, stop for a break and top off the tank and plan for my next leg. Avoid metropolitan areas and go around them (694-494 loops around Minneapolis/St Paul help a lot to avoid the DT areas that bottle neck), take side roads and visit small towns. I plan on what you said, 300 mi a day. Honestly I don't like doing more than 150 w/o a break. I will heed this advice. Thanks. If you see me and my green machine say hello.

PawPaw_n_Gram

On the Road Somewhere

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2012

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 02/18/21 01:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Green Goblin wrote:

Honestly I don't like doing more than 150 w/o a break. I will heed this advice. Thanks. If you see me and my green machine say hello.


My 2012 Ram 2500 Hemi can do about 200 miles on a 30 gallon tank towing. But my bladder cannot do 4 hours.

I plan to never drop below 1/2 tank of fuel, which is normally near 130-150 miles when towing.

Occasionally, if I know the fuel stops, I-35 between DFW and San Antonio for example, I'll run down to a quarter tank. But I'm stopping for a .... break after about 2 1/2 hours. Period.

rlw999

Washington State

Senior Member

Joined: 08/19/2020

View Profile



Posted: 02/18/21 01:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use a Garmin 780RV for general navigation, I really like the routing and the UI to see what's ahead for gas, food, etc. The low bridge warning has warned me off some routes so that seems to be working well.

Even though the Garmin does have traffic routing (it gets updates by linking with your phone), I found that Google Maps is much better for traffic, so I use both -- the Garmin GPS for general navigation, and Google Maps on my phone to look for traffic, especially when in/near cities.

Green Goblin

Minneapolis

New Member

Joined: 02/18/2021

View Profile



Posted: 02/18/21 02:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rlw999 wrote:

I use a Garmin 780RV for general navigation, I really like the routing and the UI to see what's ahead for gas, food, etc. The low bridge warning has warned me off some routes so that seems to be working well.

Even though the Garmin does have traffic routing (it gets updates by linking with your phone), I found that Google Maps is much better for traffic, so I use both -- the Garmin GPS for general navigation, and Google Maps on my phone to look for traffic, especially when in/near cities.


I was behind a delivery driver, standard box truck, who wasn't paying attention and hit an overpass walk way or street Just WAM!!! at full speed. I also witnessed a similar truck get stuck in an underground delivery dock, shaved off the sheetmetal off the top of the truck like a sardine can. We had to drop his tire pressures down to the rims to get him out. I plan on being very careful.

pbeverly

South Carolina

Full Member

Joined: 09/04/2018

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/19/21 04:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always used TomTom devices and when the last one died I use TomTom on my phone. There is an annual subscription which I am fine with. When things get complicated it zooms in and provides excellent lane guidance, voice and visual. Maps are updated once a quarter. Real time traffic information is good as well.

Maps are downloaded onto your device. Quite often we will be out of reach of a cell tower and on a whim decide to go somewhere. With google maps and no cell service this can be a problem.


Ridgeway, SC

pitch

NY

Senior Member

Joined: 06/08/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/19/21 05:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I realize that I am a freak. I don't route to destinations,just wander in the general direction and fine tune when I get close. I use just a plain ole Garmin.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Beginning RVing

 > Navigation
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Beginning RVing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.