Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: What constitutes a "new" tire?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class A Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Maintenance Issues & Tips

 > What constitutes a "new" tire?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/25/21 03:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fijidad wrote:

Ivylog wrote:

I would settle for tires up to 6 months old as new. Requiring one month, especially on a tire not made in the US is probably impossible. Only RVers are obsessed with the age of tires, especially if you replace at 6-7 years.


Thanks Ivylog. This is the first time I'll be replacing tires on a MH, so appreciate the well-reasoned response.


I think if I had a MH that used 22.5 or 24.5 tires I would talk to a local trucking co, offer to trade my original tires for some that had 50% tread. Tires that are 2 years old, and half tread will age out before wear out, in 4 years instead of 6. Win win

GDS-3950BH

DC

Senior Member

Joined: 12/08/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/26/21 02:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some of you folks are nuts. Tire OCD perhaps.

I have tires (Bridgestone) that were purchased on Ebay in 2016, mounted OEM take offs from a GM truck on the OEM GM wheels . They were stored in my garage 2016 - 2019. They are currently on the truck with about 25K miles or so on them and are going strong. Manufacture date is 10-15. My only concern is the 2015 air in them.

CapriRacer

Somewhere in the US

Senior Member

Joined: 01/27/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/26/21 06:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

CapriRacer wrote:

It is a commonly held belief within the tire industry that any tire within 6 years of the manufacture date can be sold as "NEW". I say "belief" because I know of no data that supports (or denies) this.


6 yrs or 6 months.

I seriously doubt you could get a manufacture to go on record saying a 6yr old tire is like new.

Also, are you talking about legally or realistically? Legally, new products that have not been sold before are considered "new". Find a dealer with a 1985 Ford Ranger that's been sitting at the back of the lot never sold, the dealer can legitimately sell it as new but realistically, they aren't going to lie and say it's a 2021 model.


If you read the rest of the post, I said they TESTED the tires and could not find a difference after 3 years. They did not test beyond that because they wanted to set a policy of 3 years and wanted data to back that up. No, they didn't publish the data - it was for internal use.


********************************************************************

CapriRacer

Visit my web site: www.BarrysTireTech.com

valhalla360

No paticular place.

Senior Member

Joined: 08/19/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/26/21 06:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CapriRacer wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:

CapriRacer wrote:

It is a commonly held belief within the tire industry that any tire within 6 years of the manufacture date can be sold as "NEW". I say "belief" because I know of no data that supports (or denies) this.


6 yrs or 6 months.

I seriously doubt you could get a manufacture to go on record saying a 6yr old tire is like new.

Also, are you talking about legally or realistically? Legally, new products that have not been sold before are considered "new". Find a dealer with a 1985 Ford Ranger that's been sitting at the back of the lot never sold, the dealer can legitimately sell it as new but realistically, they aren't going to lie and say it's a 2021 model.


If you read the rest of the post, I said they TESTED the tires and could not find a difference after 3 years. They did not test beyond that because they wanted to set a policy of 3 years and wanted data to back that up. No, they didn't publish the data - it was for internal use.


So what is the 3yr policy they were testing for?
- Can't sell a tire that has set in the warehouse for 3yrs: In that case, it's a flawed test. It should then continue out for somewhere around 8-10yrs as the 3yr mark doesn't test the impact on end of life condition.
- Buyers can use the tires for at least 3 yrs if they buy and mount them immediately after manufacture: Thanks for telling us the obvious.

This story doesn't make sense.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
Gemini Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and RV


JALLEN4

SouthWest Ohio

Senior Member

Joined: 10/02/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/27/21 06:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'll tell you what doesn't make sense...this ridiculous misinformation that keeps getting spread about tire age on forums. If I still owned a tire store instead of being retired I would love it! At the current rate of travel, people on here will be advocating yearly tire replacements sometime in the near future!

The 5-6 year window is a myth to begin with. No less than Michelin, probably the worlds most trusted tire company, says 5-6 years is when tires should have a yearly INSPECTION. They state tires can last ten years but should be inspected for tread separation, bulges, etc annually after five years.

The reason tires deteriorate is because of UV exposure and exposure to the elements while in use. Tires stored in a warehouse certainly are not aging at the same rate as tires traveling down the road. Tires stored on a vehicle parked in a garage are not aging at the same rate as those sitting uncovered in a wide open parking lot.

Tires fail most often because they have been damaged while in use or because they are run at improper air pressures for their use. There is simply no reason to worry about a few months old new tire being installed as the aging process is no where equivalent to one in use. There are a ton of logistical reasons why tires are not immediate production line to mounting on a vehicle. By the same token there are a ton of reasons tire aging is not linear from the production line to the end of usability. People would be much better served to be concerned about tracking tire air pressures, weight load, and annual inspection instead of these amateur "the sky is falling predictions" you find on forums such as these.

CapriRacer

Somewhere in the US

Senior Member

Joined: 01/27/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/27/21 06:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

CapriRacer wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:

CapriRacer wrote:

It is a commonly held belief within the tire industry that any tire within 6 years of the manufacture date can be sold as "NEW". I say "belief" because I know of no data that supports (or denies) this.


6 yrs or 6 months.

I seriously doubt you could get a manufacture to go on record saying a 6yr old tire is like new.

Also, are you talking about legally or realistically? Legally, new products that have not been sold before are considered "new". Find a dealer with a 1985 Ford Ranger that's been sitting at the back of the lot never sold, the dealer can legitimately sell it as new but realistically, they aren't going to lie and say it's a 2021 model.


If you read the rest of the post, I said they TESTED the tires and could not find a difference after 3 years. They did not test beyond that because they wanted to set a policy of 3 years and wanted data to back that up. No, they didn't publish the data - it was for internal use.


So what is the 3yr policy they were testing for?
- Can't sell a tire that has set in the warehouse for 3yrs: In that case, it's a flawed test. It should then continue out for somewhere around 8-10yrs as the 3yr mark doesn't test the impact on end of life condition.
- Buyers can use the tires for at least 3 yrs if they buy and mount them immediately after manufacture: Thanks for telling us the obvious.

This story doesn't make sense.


I think the key point you are missing is that tires age much more slowly when sitting in a warehouse compared to being in service.

rhagfo

Portland, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 07/06/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/27/21 06:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

fijidad wrote:

Ivylog wrote:

I would settle for tires up to 6 months old as new. Requiring one month, especially on a tire not made in the US is probably impossible. Only RVers are obsessed with the age of tires, especially if you replace at 6-7 years.


Thanks Ivylog. This is the first time I'll be replacing tires on a MH, so appreciate the well-reasoned response.


I think if I had a MH that used 22.5 or 24.5 tires I would talk to a local trucking co, offer to trade my original tires for some that had 50% tread. Tires that are 2 years old, and half tread will age out before wear out, in 4 years instead of 6. Win win


Well how many of you MISSED this is Class A MH?
The OP is likely looking at a less common tire size, so getting 30 day old tires is not likely going to happen, maybe six months. He is likely looking at true TRUCK tires, that a trucking operator would buy, run the tread down, then have capped at least a couple times.


Russ & Paula the Beagle Belle.
2016 Ram Laramie 3500 Aisin DRW 4X4 Long bed.
2005 Copper Canyon 293 FWSLS, 32' GVWR 12,360#

"Visit and Enjoy Oregon State Parks"


dodge guy

Bartlett IL

Senior Member

Joined: 03/23/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/27/21 07:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JALLEN4 wrote:

I'll tell you what doesn't make sense...this ridiculous misinformation that keeps getting spread about tire age on forums. If I still owned a tire store instead of being retired I would love it! At the current rate of travel, people on here will be advocating yearly tire replacements sometime in the near future!

The 5-6 year window is a myth to begin with. No less than Michelin, probably the worlds most trusted tire company, says 5-6 years is when tires should have a yearly INSPECTION. They state tires can last ten years but should be inspected for tread separation, bulges, etc annually after five years.

The reason tires deteriorate is because of UV exposure and exposure to the elements while in use. Tires stored in a warehouse certainly are not aging at the same rate as tires traveling down the road. Tires stored on a vehicle parked in a garage are not aging at the same rate as those sitting uncovered in a wide open parking lot.

Tires fail most often because they have been damaged while in use or because they are run at improper air pressures for their use. There is simply no reason to worry about a few months old new tire being installed as the aging process is no where equivalent to one in use. There are a ton of logistical reasons why tires are not immediate production line to mounting on a vehicle. By the same token there are a ton of reasons tire aging is not linear from the production line to the end of usability. People would be much better served to be concerned about tracking tire air pressures, weight load, and annual inspection instead of these amateur "the sky is falling predictions" you find on forums such as these.


Well I think he 5 year recommendation on trailer tires is accurate. Anyone that has had a tire go bad has been at the 5-6 year mark. You can't see the belts inside a trailer tire so an inspection doesn't tell you everything. But that is how I found a shifted belt on one of my 5 year old trailer tires. ST tires see different loads than a car/t I know/MH tire does. So that is why it is recommended. And you can't feel a tire going bad on a trailer because it is far behind you.

No my MH tires I will run until I see an issue. But yes hey should always be inspected. I found my failed tire when chocking it at a campground.


Wife Kim
Son Brandon 17yrs
Daughter Marissa 16yrs
Dog Bailey

12 Forest River Georgetown 350TS Hellwig sway bars, BlueOx TrueCenter stabilizer

13 Ford Explorer Roadmaster Stowmaster 5000, VIP Tow>
A bad day camping is
better than a good day at work!


KangaBunnyRoux

SanAntonio

New Member

Joined: 12/11/2020

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/27/21 01:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I too would be okay for 6 months. I look hard at my tires at 5 years and aim for full replacement at 7. Likely start swapping one each time inspected at year 5 so I don't get a killer 2K bill all at once. I just got a road hazard flat after rolling over what looks like a huge nail, maybe a spike of sorts. 2.5 years old from date of purchase, with 1670 miles on them. Awaiting claim decision on reimbursement. You need read that in another thread. It was quite an ordeal. Corporate is working it for me now. But talk about disconnects on a routine situation.

fijidad

Escondido, CA

New Member

Joined: 02/09/2021

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 04/08/21 06:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just following up to say thanks for the tips...I bought the 6-month old Toyo's and all is well.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Maintenance Issues & Tips

 > What constitutes a "new" tire?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class A Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.