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 > Chevrolet exits all ICE production by 2035

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JRscooby

Indepmo

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Posted: 03/10/21 05:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lbrjet wrote:

How is a truck stop going to be configured for EV? All trucks back into the spaces today.


Been a minute sense I was in one, but before I retired some truckstops where setting up to blow air for climate control, plus power, internet, cable TV in thru the cab window.
But I bet for decades the E trucks will be terminal to terminal operations. Back the mass union busting they called "deregulation" the trucking companies set up motels for drivers between terminals, if there was not enough freight starting/ending in a area for a terminal. Back then it was a slip-seat deal, where diver pulled up, another left with the truck and load. Not much of a stretch to imagine swapping tractors, let it charge while driver sleeps. (Assuming can run for 10 hrs on 10 hrs of charge.

rlw999

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Posted: 03/10/21 06:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

Is anybody actually developing a long haul yet? I know a couple of companies including Tesla are working on more of that medium range depot to depot thing. Has anybody gone down that long haul road yet?


That doesn't really matter for the RV market. I know there are die-hard RVers that claim that anything with less than a thousand miles of range is useless, but when the average RV is only driven 5000 miles a year and 300 miles is considered a long day of driving, getting even 200 miles of range between charges is going to be more than enough for the average RVer, especially when they look at the cost of the battery that would give them 1000 miles of range. 200 miles of range just means that if you want to drive farther, you need to take a break every 3 or 4 hours while charging.

time2roll

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Posted: 03/10/21 06:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

Is anybody actually developing a long haul yet?
For what? Google says the average semi truck does 45,000 miles per year. 500 miles range easily covers this.


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lbrjet

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Posted: 03/10/21 07:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

lbrjet wrote:

How is a truck stop going to be configured for EV? All trucks back into the spaces today.


Why would it make a difference with electric...or hydrogen. Are you talking fueling or parking.


I assumed the fueling would be an over night affair. Especially in the winter to keep the heat on while sleeping.


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rlw999

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Posted: 03/10/21 07:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lbrjet wrote:

Reisender wrote:

lbrjet wrote:

How is a truck stop going to be configured for EV? All trucks back into the spaces today.


Why would it make a difference with electric...or hydrogen. Are you talking fueling or parking.


I assumed the fueling would be an over night affair. Especially in the winter to keep the heat on while sleeping.


In the 15 - 20 years it will take to see significant numbers of long-haul trucks to be electrified, there won't be a driver in the cab to keep warm.

Reisender

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Posted: 03/10/21 07:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lbrjet wrote:

Reisender wrote:

lbrjet wrote:

How is a truck stop going to be configured for EV? All trucks back into the spaces today.


Why would it make a difference with electric...or hydrogen. Are you talking fueling or parking.


I assumed the fueling would be an over night affair. Especially in the winter to keep the heat on while sleeping.


Never thought of that. I always assumed it would be a DC fast charging affair at a depot. More along the lines of an hour or two with a 500 KW or more 800 volt system. Who knows. But your idea may work. A couple of 19.2 KW 240 AC umbilicals overnight. That would deliver around 500 Kw overnight. Tesla used to put 19.2 KW chargers in their model S’s. An 80 amp EVSE (supplying the 19.2 KW) would run about 1000 bucks each. Maybe suspended from above? They are pretty small.

Interesting.

Keeping the heat on overnight wouldn’t use more than about 8 or 10 KW.

RoyJ

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Posted: 03/10/21 09:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

lbrjet wrote:

How is a truck stop going to be configured for EV? All trucks back into the spaces today.


The easiest would be underground charger with the plug hidden u underneath a lid.

Utility companies would need some serious power feed. At say 1000kW per truck and 50 trucks, that's 50 megawatts. Minimum 138kV primary feed I'd say.

time2roll

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Posted: 03/10/21 09:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What if many of the trucks still had half charge at the end of the day?

RoyJ

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Posted: 03/10/21 09:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

Never thought of that. I always assumed it would be a DC fast charging affair at a depot. More along the lines of an hour or two with a 500 KW or more 800 volt system. Who knows. But your idea may work. A couple of 19.2 KW 240 AC umbilicals overnight. That would deliver around 500 Kw overnight. Tesla used to put 19.2 KW chargers in their model S’s. An 80 amp EVSE (supplying the 19.2 KW) would run about 1000 bucks each. Maybe suspended from above? They are pretty small.

Interesting.

Keeping the heat on overnight wouldn’t use more than about 8 or 10 KW.


For the trucking industry to accept overnight charging, they'd have to do away without team drivers. Fast shipping would need a hub and terminal, where trailers are swapped for a fresh tractor.

But there's no reason why a semi can't charge as fast as a Tesla car. The distribution grid is the only limit. Right now in BC at least, BC Hydro would not run a 138kV transmission line unless it's a major industrial customer (foundry, pulp paper, etc). If every Flying J is fed at that voltage, new substations would be needed.

Reisender

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Posted: 03/10/21 10:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RoyJ wrote:

Reisender wrote:

Never thought of that. I always assumed it would be a DC fast charging affair at a depot. More along the lines of an hour or two with a 500 KW or more 800 volt system. Who knows. But your idea may work. A couple of 19.2 KW 240 AC umbilicals overnight. That would deliver around 500 Kw overnight. Tesla used to put 19.2 KW chargers in their model S’s. An 80 amp EVSE (supplying the 19.2 KW) would run about 1000 bucks each. Maybe suspended from above? They are pretty small.

Interesting.

Keeping the heat on overnight wouldn’t use more than about 8 or 10 KW.


For the trucking industry to accept overnight charging, they'd have to do away without team drivers. Fast shipping would need a hub and terminal, where trailers are swapped for a fresh tractor.

But there's no reason why a semi can't charge as fast as a Tesla car. The distribution grid is the only limit. Right now in BC at least, BC Hydro would not run a 138kV transmission line unless it's a major industrial customer (foundry, pulp paper, etc). If every Flying J is fed at that voltage, new substations would be needed.


Yah the electrical calculations are out of my league. Typical V3 Superchargers are 16 station affairs all at 250 KW. Some are bigger and some are smaller. Just had a second one open near us in west Kelowna but it’s a smaller 8 station 250 KW affair. There is another 8 station older V2 150 kw supercharger in downtown Kelowna. I think a lot of the BC Superchargers are 8 station affairs, or at least most that we have been to, although Vancouver seems to have a bunch of those 20 station Superchargers. Those things must suck some power.

Biggest Supercharger we have seen is Kettleman on I5. Something like 46 or something V3 stations. Huge. Lounge, Coffee with a barista etc. Maybe Tesla will set up that kind of thing.

They’ll figure it out.

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