Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Another Towing Question
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 > Another Towing Question

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MFL

Midwest

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Posted: 02/25/21 05:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That info a bit more accurate. [emoticon]

The 1524 cargo capacity will be reduced by anything added to the truck, and at least 1,000 lbs tongue wt, plus wt of WDH. So say 2 passengers plus dog 300 lbs and 200 lbs gear and other. You have now reached your GVWR of truck.

The RAWR is important and shows 3,800 lb capacity. If your truck full of fuel, passengers, gear, etc, has a scaled rear axle wt of say (guessing) 2,600 lbs, you would only be able to add 1,200 more, before going over RAWR.

So...while your truck has the power to tow much more weight, you are at the very limit of carrying/payload capacity with that trailer.

That will not be the best experience for a beginner, towing to the max or maybe even a bit over your max capacity. Don't forget to check the actual sticker attached to the receiver hitch! It may read max with WDH 1,000 lbs, which you may exceed a bit.

Will your truck break, wheels fall off, if a bit over?? Probably not, and there is always someone even more overloaded, and it works for them.

Hope you understand, why the numbers don't always work, for all types of trailers. Lots more things to consider, than it will pull XXXXX lbs. [emoticon]

You will want to air tires on truck to near max pressure on rear, when towing that heavy, and likely 40 or so lbs in front tires. Your sticker shows 35 psi.

Hope you get it worked out, and can enjoy a fun camping, and towing experience.[emoticon]

Jerry





camp-n-family

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Posted: 02/25/21 07:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That’s a lot of trailer for a half ton truck. Been there, now tow with a 2500. You might be able to make the numbers work (doubtful) but it likely won’t be a fun or comfortable especially for someone with no towing experience. Being a bunkhouse model I’m going to assume you have several passengers in the truck and will be loading the trailer pretty good. You have plenty of power, just not enough truck.


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nickthehunter

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Posted: 02/25/21 07:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Now that you know what all the real numbers are ( from the stickers) you can go here and learn what all the numbers mean and how to figure out if you are within the F150’s ratings Clicky
The way I see it, you got about 400 lbs+/- for passengers and cargo in the truck.

2112

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Posted: 02/25/21 07:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Set up the hitch properly, fill the tank with gas, hitch up the trailer, air up all tires to max pressure according to tire sidewall, put all the people you plan to take camping with you and go weigh it at a CAT Scale. There are several in your area. You will know how much axle weight you'll have left. Your concern will be not exceeding the 3800Lb rear axle rating too much when the TT is loaded.

Weigh it again after it's loaded ready to camp


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valhalla360

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Posted: 02/26/21 07:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ttugurl wrote:

Tire and Loading Information

The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed: 1524lbs.

Front:275/55R20 113T
Rear:275/55R20 113T
Spare: 255/70R18 113T

240KPA, 35PSI each


At 9,000lb, your hitch weight should be on the order of 1,100-1,200lb.

That leaves you 300-400lb for everything else in the truck...including passengers.

Also, your rear axle is only rated or 3,800lb. Once you subtract the empty weight off that, you probably only have 800-1200lb left...you hitch weight will eat that up and then some. That means you have to run with pretty much nothing in the truck bed (including a cap or cover).

L3 on the sticker implies a 3.31 axle ratio...not a huge issue if you have a 10 speed tranny but not ideal.

The 3.5 ecoboost is plenty powerful.

You could load it up and take it to a CAT scale to confirm but at the very least, you are pushing this truck to the limits.

1/2 ton trucks come in a wide variety of capabilities and unfortunately you have one that is on the lower end of those capabilities.


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APT

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Posted: 02/26/21 07:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

7500 pounds dry = 8500-9000 pounds loaded. Loaded TW will be 1050-1300 pounds.

You mention that you are new to towing. You are planning to exceed GVWR and rear axle rating of the brand new $40-$70k pickup and $20k-$30k RV. Those people that do have experience and report on this forum towing a 7500 pound travel trailer with even the most capable half tons general are not comfortable on the highway.

I recommend a truck with at least 2000 pounds of payload and receiver rating of at least 1400 pounds when using a WDH, which is not that F-150. Whichever one is "cheaper" to change, I recommend it. For a TT, 6k dry is a good guideline for something like your F-150, which will likely still be over at least one rating with a family in the cab and a bed full of camping gear.

FWIW, my TV has 2050 pounds of payload, 9400 pound tow rating, but a relatively weak receiver @ 1000 pounds with WDH. I would not towing that TT, but I bet it would tow it more comfortably until my receiver breaks.

* This post was edited 02/26/21 12:14pm by APT *


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GrandpaKip

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Posted: 02/26/21 08:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Basically, your 150 will be at max load or over. It will pull that trailer but no one here can tell you how safe or comfortable that trip will be. Personally, I like to have a cushion on all the parameters of my truck and trailer.
That said, if you decide to stick with your truck, the very first thing I’d do would be to go get new LT tires if P tires are on it now.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 02/26/21 08:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ttugurl wrote:

[image]


Your rear axle is a 3.31 gear, so not the ultimate towing gears, but being a 2020 Ecoboost, the 10 speed makes up for the taller gears handily. So that's not an issue.
If I'm not mistaken, the RAWR is artificially low at 3800lbs. I believe all 3.5 Ecoboosts get the 9.75" rear diff, which is, in reality a 4800-5000lb rear axle. Someone, preferably the OP correct me if I'm wrong on this.
Even the factory tires are good for 5000lb rear axle load although I'd look for some heavier tires when these wear out.
You're still good.


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MFL

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Posted: 02/26/21 09:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^^^^While LT tires are not a bad idea, they are not needed, as the current tires are more than adequate, when aired properly for towing.

Jerry

ronharmless

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Posted: 02/26/21 12:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

...Also, your rear axle is only rated or 3,800lb. Once you subtract the empty weight off that, you probably only have 800-1200lb left...you hitch weight will eat that up and then some. That means you have to run with pretty much nothing in the truck bed (including a cap or cover)...
The curb weight on the rear axle of that truck is about 2000 lbs, the long shot is 2200 lbs. if its got all the bells and whistles plus a kitchen sink (which isn't likely cause those come with 4800 RAWR). That leaves probably another 1800 lbs± before you get to the 3800 lbs rear axle rating.

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