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 > And so it begins. (In North America).

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JimBollman

Lost State of Franklin

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Posted: 03/07/21 06:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

They need to get the range out to 500-700 miles to be practical as our main vehicle for trips. That is our range when we have a destination. 350 would be ok when we are just wandering on vacation. Both still requires enough charging stations. Would hate to sit for 40 minutes getting a charge in the middle of an already long trip. Longer if there is a line at the charging station. I could see going hybrid where are normal driving would be electric but trips the engine could take over. Friends have a Volt and love it, when they are home they go for months on a tank of gas but can get in it and drive cross country if needed.

I heard that a 115v charger can take 3+ days to get a full charge on the new Mach E Ford and a 220v charge still takes 12hr or so. You need a special high current charging system $$$ to get it down under an hour.

atreis

IN

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Posted: 03/07/21 07:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

During that 40 minutes, you'd hopefully be having lunch rather than sitting and waiting. I think it will be an adjustment, but doable once people get used to it.

JimBollman wrote:

Friends have a Volt and love it, when they are home they go for months on a tank of gas but can get in it and drive cross country if needed.


IMO, the Volt was a great design for a transitional vehicle. In a lot of ways, better than the Prius and other Hybrids. It's a shame they stopped making it.


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Reisender

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Posted: 03/07/21 07:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimBollman wrote:

They need to get the range out to 500-700 miles to be practical as our main vehicle for trips. That is our range when we have a destination. 350 would be ok when we are just wandering on vacation. Both still requires enough charging stations. Would hate to sit for 40 minutes getting a charge in the middle of an already long trip. Longer if there is a line at the charging station. I could see going hybrid where are normal driving would be electric but trips the engine could take over. Friends have a Volt and love it, when they are home they go for months on a tank of gas but can get in it and drive cross country if needed.

I heard that a 115v charger can take 3+ days to get a full charge on the new Mach E Ford and a 220v charge still takes 12hr or so. You need a special high current charging system $$$ to get it down under an hour.


We just plug ours in before we go to bed. It’s always charged in the morning.

On road trips we typically stop every two or three hours for a pee, walk the dog, usually ten or 15 minutes. We just charge when we are stopped. We don’t really stop to charge. We have never been at a supercharger for more than twenty minutes. Then again, our road trips are usually no longer than about 800 kilometers per day. Our travel days take no longer now than we drove the grand Cherokee. For us, there would be a ton of disadvantages and no advantages to driving a gasser. To each his own. Everybody travels differently.

* This post was edited 03/07/21 07:41pm by Reisender *

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 03/08/21 11:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

atreis wrote:

During that 40 minutes, you'd hopefully be having lunch rather than sitting and waiting. I think it will be an adjustment, but doable once people get used to it.

.

Yeah, it's super easy, stop and have lunch, charge up the ole Duracells....along with everyone else who stops for lunch between 11am-1pm....
I'm sure the "average" number of charging stations won't have a line to get to them if stopping at lunch becomes the popular way to charge.


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atreis

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Posted: 03/08/21 06:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:


Yeah, it's super easy, stop and have lunch, charge up the ole Duracells....along with everyone else who stops for lunch between 11am-1pm....
I'm sure the "average" number of charging stations won't have a line to get to them if stopping at lunch becomes the popular way to charge.


Whether one chooses to assume the worst, the best, or somewhere in between (me) is a personal choice. I've had to wait upwards of 30 minutes for gas in the relatively recent past, and far longer in my much younger days. Yes, no doubt it will occasionally happen, just as it occasionally happens for gas, that one has to wait one's turn. Hopefully it will happen as infrequently.

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Posted: 03/08/21 06:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have personally never waited in line at a Supercharger or DCFC. I have heard of cues forming at Superchargers on long weekends. This is slowly getting better as more and more V3 Superchargers come on line and more Supercharger locations are added.

Another 8 stall V3 Supercharger went in about 70 km from us last week. Way to close for us to use but the folks coming from Vancouver will appreciate it. Up till now there was only the 8 stall V2 Supercharger down the road. V3 Superchargers are so fast you barely have time for a pee and maybe grabbing a snack and coffee. Certainly no time for lunch. We avoid them at lunch times and look for something slower so we can take our time....but thats just how we travel.

Meanwhile, this is a palm springs area costco gas bar. Its like this every day all day, to the point that the cops need to do traffic control. They are sitting there idling away trying to stay cool. 20 to 40 minute line ups every day. Is Costco gas really that cheap? No idea.

[image]


Apx 95 percent of EV charging is done at home...while you sleep. 100 percent of gas fueling is done...at gas stations.

Heres our gas station...in our garage....and its a quarter of the price. [emoticon]

[image]

* This post was edited 03/08/21 07:03pm by an administrator/moderator *

mileshuff

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Posted: 03/08/21 07:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

atreis wrote:

During that 40 minutes, you'd hopefully be having lunch rather than sitting and waiting. I think it will be an adjustment, but doable once people get used to it.


We usually don't stop for a sit down lunch. We stop for gas. While I pump my wife goes inside to grab some lunch to go. Then back on the road. I have no desire to get used to stopping for 40 minutes for a fill up.


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mileshuff

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Posted: 03/08/21 08:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

They are sitting there idling away trying to stay cool. 20 to 40 minute line ups every day. Is Costco gas really that cheap? No idea.

Heres our gas station...in our garage....and its a quarter of the price. [emoticon]



Yes, quite often Costco is that much cheaper. One near my house is typically 40-50 cents a gallon cheaper than other gas stations in the area. For the most part, electric cars are not a quarter of the price. Sure, cheaper to charge than fill the tank. But the car itself costs far more for the equivalent gas car. The payback of years is too long to make it worthwhile for me at this time.

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Posted: 03/08/21 08:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fueling costs differ depending on where you are and what gas and electricity prices are. Where we are its easily a quarter. Plus virtually no maintenance. No oil, oil filters, belts, hoses, plugs, wires, air filters, breaks are rarely used because of regeneration. Washer fluid is your biggest expense.

I would disagree on them costing far more. There are currently no cheapy EV's on the market. They pretty much start about 22000 bucks for a Chevy Bolt so yah, more expensive. Still lots of people can afford them.

However, as far as equivalent price to a gas car. There are lots, but mostly on the upper end market cars. A tesla model 3 AWD is roughly the same price or even cheaper than an equivalent performing and featured BMW. The problem is that they are both high performance premium sports sedans. This also applies to the model Y, Model S and Model X. They are all about the same price as their gas competitors. BMW is getting hammered by Tesla just because of this. Really, to get the same performance from a BMW one would have to step up close to 7 grand more than the a Tesla. Either that or tie a big anchor to the Tesla to slow it down so the BMW can keep up. [emoticon]

Mercedes are more pointed at the luxury world so harder to compare although the model S isn't far off, and generally superior in performance.


JMHO

* This post was last edited 03/09/21 06:52am by an administrator/moderator *   View edit history

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Posted: 03/08/21 08:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mileshuff wrote:

atreis wrote:

During that 40 minutes, you'd hopefully be having lunch rather than sitting and waiting. I think it will be an adjustment, but doable once people get used to it.


We usually don't stop for a sit down lunch. We stop for gas. While I pump my wife goes inside to grab some lunch to go. Then back on the road. I have no desire to get used to stopping for 40 minutes for a fill up.


OK. I get that. Every body travels different. But it depends what EV you are driving as well. We have never been at a V3 Supercharger for more than 20 minutes and quite often shorter. EV's cant be generalized in terms of performance and/or charging speed. Some models are great...and some not so much.

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