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 > Torquing tire stud by hand

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klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 03/21/21 09:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Working on race cars that need to have torque checked on certain bolts after each run , we do a snap check. Set the torque wrench to say 150lbs and push fast and quick. It will click and verify the torque.

When tightening wheels use a cross pattern. it doesn't have to be exact, just do opposites. Wheel studs are designed to be tightened and loosened many cycles.

I have changed hundreds of tires on big rigs and other vehicles in the companies fleet, we rarely changed studs unless they were cross threaded. Overtorquing by 10 lbs not an issue, under tightening should be the

concern.

crawford

Dandridge Tenn.

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Posted: 03/21/21 02:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If using a tork stick on the end of air gun it's ok that's why you see them with the torque as follow up many large company's use them. Most people not in tire business would"nt even see them just thinking it was just a extension on the gun.


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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 03/21/21 02:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lots of wild claims here. 200ft lbs over the proper torque and 1” drive impacts?
Or some reeeeallly bad shops.
And considering I’ve never even seen a socket small enough for a light vehicle lug that would fit on a 1” drive, they actually reduced it down to use a, what, 20lb impact wrench?


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CharlesinGA

South of Atlanta, Georgia

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Posted: 03/22/21 12:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

90% of the time, I remove the wheels at home and take them to the tire shop in one of my trucks. Mostly I deal with a small family owned tire shop and when they do R&R the wheels they run them down snug with a air gun and do the final torquing with a torque wrench. When I get home, I take a breaker bar and one at a time loosen and with a torque wrench retighten, then go to the next lug. I trust NO ONE with my wheels.

I have been dealing with Discount tire on swapping trailer tires I bought last year to new wheels (I carried the wheels and tires in). While sitting at the glass and watching them work on a car in the bay, the "tech" runs the lug nuts down tight and takes a torque wrench and goes "click, click, click....." and I watch closely, the lugs never turn. He over torques them with the impact and then just checks them with the torque wrench for show............

I have enough issues with them getting a decent balance on trailer tires, I would not trust them with my vehicles.

The studs are very hard metal, grade 8 or harder. Its the lugnuts that are soft. I had two back tires replaced on my old Ranger one time. It was.... yes.... Wal-Mart. When I got home I decided to break them loose, it was all I could do with a breaker bar and a cheater pipe to get them broke loose, then I had to use an impact to remove them, the threads in the lugnuts were nearly stripped, the studs were fine. I ended up buying 10 new lugnuts and replacing them all. Truck has another 200K on it since then, still going strong.

Charles

* This post was edited 03/22/21 10:39am by CharlesinGA *


'03 Ram 2500 CTD, 5.9HO six speed std cab long bed Leer top and 2008 Bigfoot 25B21RB.. previously 2008 Thor/Dutchman Freedom Spirit 180. SOLD - 2007 Winnebago View 23H Motorhome.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 03/22/21 09:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Since the primary duty of a trailer tire is supporting a vertical load, rather than gripping an automobile through turns, trailer tires do not have to be dynamically balanced like passenger car tires do. Steering and cornering are less of a concern on a trailer tire than they are on an automotive tire."

I haven't balanced any of my trailer tires nor was ever asked to have it done by the tire shops. Is there a difference in a balanced tire? Asked this question, and read

multiple responses from tire manufacturers etc. Interesting.

CharlesinGA

South of Atlanta, Georgia

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Posted: 03/22/21 10:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

klutchdust wrote:

"Since the primary duty of a trailer tire is supporting a vertical load, rather than gripping an automobile through turns, trailer tires do not have to be dynamically balanced like passenger car tires do. Steering and cornering are less of a concern on a trailer tire than they are on an automotive tire."

I haven't balanced any of my trailer tires nor was ever asked to have it done by the tire shops. Is there a difference in a balanced tire? Asked this question, and read

multiple responses from tire manufacturers etc. Interesting.


I absolutely insist on tires for anything, including trailers to be balanced. Balancing has to do with ride quality and vibration, and if you have out of balance wheels, its like the trailer is being driven on a dirt or gravel road 100% of the time. It loosens electrical connections, it makes things move around in cabinets, cabinet doors to come open and things to fall out, can cause water leaks, and generally wreak havoc on the trailer and everything in it. You also suffer from additional suspension wear, bolts and bushings, shocks if you have them, all take a beating with out of balance tires.

Airstreams for example, will pop rivets if they have a rough ride, and so Airstreamers are very attuned to having the smoothest possible ride for the trailer.

Wheel balancing has nothing to do with cornering ability on any vehicle, but has everything to do with the life of your trailer. Think what condition your house would be in if you suffered minor earthquakes every day? Cracked sheetrock, cabinets coming loose from the walls, etc.

Charles

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 03/22/21 10:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CharlesinGA wrote:

klutchdust wrote:

"Since the primary duty of a trailer tire is supporting a vertical load, rather than gripping an automobile through turns, trailer tires do not have to be dynamically balanced like passenger car tires do. Steering and cornering are less of a concern on a trailer tire than they are on an automotive tire."

I haven't balanced any of my trailer tires nor was ever asked to have it done by the tire shops. Is there a difference in a balanced tire? Asked this question, and read

multiple responses from tire manufacturers etc. Interesting.


I absolutely insist on tires for anything, including trailers to be balanced. Balancing has to do with ride quality and vibration, and if you have out of balance wheels, its like the trailer is being driven on a dirt or gravel road 100% of the time. It loosens electrical connections, it makes things move around in cabinets, cabinet doors to come open and things to fall out, can cause water leaks, and generally wreak havoc on the trailer and everything in it. You also suffer from additional suspension wear, bolts and bushings, shocks if you have them, all take a beating with out of balance tires.

Airstreams for example, will pop rivets if they have a rough ride, and so Airstreamers are very attuned to having the smoothest possible ride for the trailer.

Wheel balancing has nothing to do with cornering ability on any vehicle, but has everything to do with the life of your trailer. Think what condition your house would be in if you suffered minor earthquakes every day? Cracked sheetrock, cabinets coming loose from the walls, etc.

Charles


I posted this for those that have limited knowledge so they can decide for themselves. It comes from engineers not me.

As far as Airstreams "popping rivets" I built Great dane trailers back in my youth and we used the same rivets that are used to build Airstreams using the same methods. Big rig trailers carry 40,000 pounds and have unbalanced tires and we did not see broken or popped rivets on units that were many many years old.

I have never heard of this happening or had issues with any trailers i owned vibrating nor could I feel it with my tow vehicle and I have pulled many different trailers thousand of miles. Some RV's use pop rivets for their paneling, Airstreams use "bucked" rivets like aircraft use.

I am glad that you have found a smooth ride for your travels.
I just don't know of anyone, personally, that balances their trailer tires.

crawford

Dandridge Tenn.

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Posted: 03/22/21 04:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I look at it this way it is you money if you feel better doing it do it. Don't listen to no one but your self.

Tvov

CT

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Posted: 03/23/21 04:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have my TT camper tires balanced, but I don't bother with my landscaping equipment trailers.

I tow my TT at 65mph routinely. My equipment trailers are usually local, and usually 40mph or slower.

Years ago I asked my local shop to balance my TT tires... he said they don't bother balancing trailer tires. I asked again, saying that I tow it at 65mph, so I don't want vibration to be an issue. He said "hmm... I never thought of it that way".

I don't think it is a critical issue at all, but for the minimal cost (usually included with new tire or maybe $10 each) it makes me happy.

Why balance motor vehicle tires? Mostly because of the vibration at higher speeds. You can travel all day long on mildly unbalanced tires at 40mph. Go 65+, it gets annoying real fast.


_________________________________________________________
2008 F-250 CrewCab 5.4L,
2004 21' Forest River Surveyor


klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 03/23/21 10:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

crawford wrote:

I look at it this way it is you money if you feel better doing it do it. Don't listen to no one but your self.


Sure, but it is also important to post fact based information.

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