Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Public Lands, Boondocking and ...

Open Roads Forum  >  Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping

 > Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/25/21 02:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

45 mph! There is no way that I can go more than 10 mph on those rough forest roads. But based on your advice (and I know you have been there and done that!), I will do my best to keep my speed up, rather than crawling into the sandy wash at 2 mph.


2012 Fun Finder X-139 "Boondock Style" (axle-flipped and extra insulation)
2013 Toyota Tacoma Off-Road (semi-beefy tires and components)
Our trips -- pix and text
About our trailer
"A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single list."


valhalla360

No paticular place.

Senior Member

Joined: 08/19/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 03/25/21 03:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If it's a relatively smooth entry and exit, keep moving. If you stop, is when you are dead.

On the other hand, check it out ahead as mentioned. Hitting a 12" drop off at 20mph is not a good thing.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
Gemini Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and RV


FWC

The Wilderness

Senior Member

Joined: 09/12/2020

View Profile



Posted: 03/25/21 03:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If there has been other traffic (which there will have been at this sort of site) then the easiest way to tell how soft the sand is to look at the previous tire tracks. If you can still make out the tread pattern of the tire, then the sand is firm (or at least was when they crossed). If you can see the tread pattern on the road, but in the sand in the tracks is largely flat on the bottom with no tread pattern, then it is getting soft - use your discretion. If the tracks in the sand look like V-shaped valleys, then stay out unless you really know what you are doing.

Can you give us an example of what you are looking at?

* This post was edited 03/25/21 03:30pm by FWC *

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 03/25/21 03:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rough forest road? By the description I was seeing a wide sand bar maybe 100 yards of sand to cross in the UT desert to cross a dry wash bed. Or maybe crossing the flatish edge of a sand dune area maybe 1/4 mile in length. By all means go slow-slow when needed.

If this is a bit of a narrow rocky creek bed you will be going slow but I don't see much sand.

All part of the adventure is not really knowing. [emoticon]


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

2oldman

NM

Senior Member

Joined: 04/15/2001

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/25/21 03:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

All part of the adventure is not really knowing. [emoticon]
Yeah, I gave up most of the 'adventure' part years ago after getting stuck. If I don't know what's ahead I'll scout it by walking or a scooter, not with the train I'm driving.

Nothing quite as exciting as getting to where you cannot turn around.

profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/25/21 05:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I will for sure scout on foot before plunging ahead. And FWC, that was a great point about looking at the tire tracks. The problem, of course, is that when I am crossing a stream bed, recent storms will have erased the tracks.

Here is a sample of what I am talking about -- although this stream crossing is more, well, extreme than what I would probably attempt -- this stream looks to be about 80 feet wide.

In this photo, the main BLM road is on the left. The access road drops down at the center. You can then see where the access road continues, on the other side of the stream:

[image]
[image]Click For Full-Size Image.

As I said, this particular crossing is too tough for me, but I am thinking about sites that involve easier sandy stream beds.

profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/25/21 06:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is a better version of the image -- this time, instead of using Google Earth's "save image" utility, I used the new screenshot app on my Mac -- the pin labels are clearer. If you are running Mojave, the shortcut is shift-command-5.

Anyway, here is the picture:

[image]
[image]Click For Full-Size Image.

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 03/25/21 07:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Looks easy with hard large granular sand. BLM road looks like an Interstate. Forest? lol

The shadows on the lower side indicate a bit of a shelf but looks like a good ramp to the left of that large bush. That is what I am talking about on following the tracks to lead you to the easiest exit point. If it looks bad walk that part first as you may not want to stop short in the middle. Could be small or could be a 2' lip to get up. Easy in the vehicle alone but a bit more complex with the trailer. Bring a small shovel for if you want to take the edge off.

Looks like some semi deep ruts at the top entrance to the wash but I doubt that will slow you down.

I would take this.

FWC

The Wilderness

Senior Member

Joined: 09/12/2020

View Profile



Posted: 03/25/21 07:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

These rarely run, and when they do it is apt to be with a storm during the monsoon, if it is a legal numbered road there will almost certainly be tracks - Utah is crazy busy already.

PS I have to admit I never knew anyone planned a dispersed camp site in advance, we always see where we end up and wander down a road.

Yosemite Sam1

Under the pines.

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2018

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 03/25/21 07:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just remember the old adage: If it’s starting to get bad, it ain’t going to be any better out there.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping

 > Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Public Lands, Boondocking and ...


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.