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jaycocreek

Idaho

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Joined: 12/28/2013

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Posted: 04/20/21 01:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Do a Google search on Ford V-10 pinging,there's a ton of post and other people with the same issue..

wing_zealot

East of the Mississippi

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Posted: 04/20/21 02:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well said Scott.

ScottG

Bothell Wa.

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Posted: 04/20/21 03:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

"Also, Knock, ping are all exactly the same thing. You are alone in your suggestion that they are anything else."

Not really. (I'm with Gdetrailer here) Clearly pre-ignition and detonation can have similar symptoms/effects, but, their origins are different.

Forget Wikipedia, I suggest you obtain/read a copy of "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 2E" by John Heywood, 2019 edition. The above is a college level required textbook for most accredited Mechanical Engineering Programs/students. Reviewing some Schlieren photography of active internal combustion chambers would also be helpful.

To the OP, you can check your catalytic converter by tapping it lightly (when cold) with a soft mallet. If it sounds like marbles rattling in a tin can, . . . . you need a new one.

Chum lee


I understand your post but respectfully disagree. In both cases the root cause is heat in the wrong place and both causes and results are characterized in the trade school text books we used as knocking, pinging, etc. and much of this was from manufacturers. They weren't the product of any one persons opinion.
In the OP's case that could be caused by anything from an EGR valve to a sensor to mechanical damage.
What ever the case, none of this is helping the OP at all.

Chum lee

Albuquerque, NM

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Posted: 04/20/21 04:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ScottG wrote:

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

"Also, Knock, ping are all exactly the same thing. You are alone in your suggestion that they are anything else."

Not really. (I'm with Gdetrailer here) Clearly pre-ignition and detonation can have similar symptoms/effects, but, their origins are different.

Forget Wikipedia, I suggest you obtain/read a copy of "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 2E" by John Heywood, 2019 edition. The above is a college level required textbook for most accredited Mechanical Engineering Programs/students. Reviewing some Schlieren photography of active internal combustion chambers would also be helpful.

To the OP, you can check your catalytic converter by tapping it lightly (when cold) with a soft mallet. If it sounds like marbles rattling in a tin can, . . . . you need a new one.

Chum lee


I understand your post but respectfully disagree. In both cases the root cause is heat in the wrong place and both causes and results are characterized in the trade school text books we used as knocking, pinging, etc. and much of this was from manufacturers. They weren't the product of any one persons opinion.
In the OP's case that could be caused by anything from an EGR valve to a sensor to mechanical damage.
What ever the case, none of this is helping the OP at all.


Thank you for your response. I'm not talking about "trade schools" or, information from "the manufacturer." I'm talking about information from the highest level "engineering schools" which I graduated from. (with highest honors) There is a difference in the curriculum.

I agree that the problem here is heat related. What's causing it, and, how to fix it is the issue.

Please, . . . read the book I referenced.

Chum lee

ScottG

Bothell Wa.

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Joined: 02/25/2005

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Posted: 04/20/21 05:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

"Also, Knock, ping are all exactly the same thing. You are alone in your suggestion that they are anything else."

Not really. (I'm with Gdetrailer here) Clearly pre-ignition and detonation can have similar symptoms/effects, but, their origins are different.

Forget Wikipedia, I suggest you obtain/read a copy of "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 2E" by John Heywood, 2019 edition. The above is a college level required textbook for most accredited Mechanical Engineering Programs/students. Reviewing some Schlieren photography of active internal combustion chambers would also be helpful.

To the OP, you can check your catalytic converter by tapping it lightly (when cold) with a soft mallet. If it sounds like marbles rattling in a tin can, . . . . you need a new one.

Chum lee


I understand your post but respectfully disagree. In both cases the root cause is heat in the wrong place and both causes and results are characterized in the trade school text books we used as knocking, pinging, etc. and much of this was from manufacturers. They weren't the product of any one persons opinion.
In the OP's case that could be caused by anything from an EGR valve to a sensor to mechanical damage.
What ever the case, none of this is helping the OP at all.


Thank you for your response. I'm not talking about "trade schools" or, information from "the manufacturer." I'm talking about information from the highest level "engineering schools" which I graduated from. (with highest honors) There is a difference in the curriculum.

I agree that the problem here is heat related. What's causing it, and, how to fix it is the issue.

Please, . . . read the book I referenced.

Chum lee


Sorry but your book doesn't trump my schooling, associated text books and lifetime of experience. You think I don't understand your point - I do but is disagree with assigning what are generic terms to be specific references.
And we're still revolving around someones ego rather than helping the OP.

* This post was edited 04/20/21 05:11pm by ScottG *

Chum lee

Albuquerque, NM

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Posted: 04/20/21 05:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ScottG wrote:

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

"Also, Knock, ping are all exactly the same thing. You are alone in your suggestion that they are anything else."

Not really. (I'm with Gdetrailer here) Clearly pre-ignition and detonation can have similar symptoms/effects, but, their origins are different.

Forget Wikipedia, I suggest you obtain/read a copy of "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 2E" by John Heywood, 2019 edition. The above is a college level required textbook for most accredited Mechanical Engineering Programs/students. Reviewing some Schlieren photography of active internal combustion chambers would also be helpful.

To the OP, you can check your catalytic converter by tapping it lightly (when cold) with a soft mallet. If it sounds like marbles rattling in a tin can, . . . . you need a new one.

Chum lee


I understand your post but respectfully disagree. In both cases the root cause is heat in the wrong place and both causes and results are characterized in the trade school text books we used as knocking, pinging, etc. and much of this was from manufacturers. They weren't the product of any one persons opinion.
In the OP's case that could be caused by anything from an EGR valve to a sensor to mechanical damage.
What ever the case, none of this is helping the OP at all.


Thank you for your response. I'm not talking about "trade schools" or, information from "the manufacturer." I'm talking about information from the highest level "engineering schools" which I graduated from. (with highest honors) There is a difference in the curriculum.

I agree that the problem here is heat related. What's causing it, and, how to fix it is the issue.

Please, . . . read the book I referenced.

Chum lee


Sorry but your book doesn't trump my schooling, associated text books and lifetime of experience. You think I don't understand your point - I do but is disagree with assigning what are generic terms to be specific references.
And we're still revolving around someones ego rather than helping the OP.


Oh for God's sake, IT'S NOT MY BOOK, IT'S A READILY ACCEPTED/ACCREDITED TEXTBOOK FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING STUDENTS. (CLEARLY, THAT'S NOT YOU) Your schooling is what it is. Mine is what it is.

Go waste someone else's time.

Chum lee

ScottG

Bothell Wa.

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Joined: 02/25/2005

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Posted: 04/20/21 06:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

Chum lee wrote:

ScottG wrote:

"Also, Knock, ping are all exactly the same thing. You are alone in your suggestion that they are anything else."

Not really. (I'm with Gdetrailer here) Clearly pre-ignition and detonation can have similar symptoms/effects, but, their origins are different.

Forget Wikipedia, I suggest you obtain/read a copy of "Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 2E" by John Heywood, 2019 edition. The above is a college level required textbook for most accredited Mechanical Engineering Programs/students. Reviewing some Schlieren photography of active internal combustion chambers would also be helpful.

To the OP, you can check your catalytic converter by tapping it lightly (when cold) with a soft mallet. If it sounds like marbles rattling in a tin can, . . . . you need a new one.

Chum lee


I understand your post but respectfully disagree. In both cases the root cause is heat in the wrong place and both causes and results are characterized in the trade school text books we used as knocking, pinging, etc. and much of this was from manufacturers. They weren't the product of any one persons opinion.
In the OP's case that could be caused by anything from an EGR valve to a sensor to mechanical damage.
What ever the case, none of this is helping the OP at all.


Thank you for your response. I'm not talking about "trade schools" or, information from "the manufacturer." I'm talking about information from the highest level "engineering schools" which I graduated from. (with highest honors) There is a difference in the curriculum.

I agree that the problem here is heat related. What's causing it, and, how to fix it is the issue.

Please, . . . read the book I referenced.

Chum lee


Sorry but your book doesn't trump my schooling, associated text books and lifetime of experience. You think I don't understand your point - I do but is disagree with assigning what are generic terms to be specific references.
And we're still revolving around someones ego rather than helping the OP.


Oh for God's sake, IT'S NOT MY BOOK, IT'S A READILY ACCEPTED/ACCREDITED TEXTBOOK FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING STUDENTS. (CLEARLY, THAT'S NOT YOU) Your schooling is what it is. Mine is what it is.

Go waste someone else's time.

Chum lee


THERE'S the Chum Lee I expected LOL. [emoticon]

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Joined: 08/16/2006

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Posted: 04/20/21 08:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would check the timing first and see if the base line timing is correct. If correct I would then check the knock sensor.

Dave H M

IL

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Joined: 08/11/2006

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Posted: 04/21/21 09:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If it were mine, I would pay the freight to get a FORD computer hoked up to it. Why not start there first?

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