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 > can a ford ranger tow trailer on steep mtns rds?

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wing_zealot

East of the Mississippi

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Posted: 04/21/21 09:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

The Ranger comes with a 10 speed automatic transmission. It can be shifted manually. USE IT ! Down shift early going up hill or down hill.
If it has the 10 sp transmission you don't have to shift manually. It has a Tow/Haul mode which incorporates engine braking and it works great. No need to overthink it, use Tow/Haul.

mkirsch

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Posted: 04/21/21 10:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What is all this malarkey about "engine braking?"

I've owned several full size pickup trucks, all with small block V8's except my '03 Chevy 3500, and NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM could hold ITSELF back on any sort of incline using the engine alone. Downshift downshift downshift, rev rev rev, faster faster faster... I ALWAYS had to control the descent with brakes.

The ONLY truck I've ever owned that would control itself on a hill is the '03 Chevy 3500 with the 8.1L and Allison. Turn on tow haul mode, hold the brakes for 3 seconds, and the hill would have to be EXTREMELY steep to need brakes, and then only a brief tap. However, the truck still needs frequent application of brakes to maintain speed with any sort of trailer behind.

Unless you're throwing out a ship's anchor at the top of the hill, you're using brakes.


Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

wing_zealot

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Posted: 04/21/21 11:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'll just leave this right here 10 spd transmission and engine braking
Enough Said

jshupe

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Posted: 04/21/21 11:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mkirsch wrote:

What is all this malarkey about "engine braking?"

I've owned several full size pickup trucks, all with small block V8's except my '03 Chevy 3500, and NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM could hold ITSELF back on any sort of incline using the engine alone. Downshift downshift downshift, rev rev rev, faster faster faster... I ALWAYS had to control the descent with brakes.

The ONLY truck I've ever owned that would control itself on a hill is the '03 Chevy 3500 with the 8.1L and Allison. Turn on tow haul mode, hold the brakes for 3 seconds, and the hill would have to be EXTREMELY steep to need brakes, and then only a brief tap. However, the truck still needs frequent application of brakes to maintain speed with any sort of trailer behind.

Unless you're throwing out a ship's anchor at the top of the hill, you're using brakes.


That's my experience with gas engines, not diesels with exhaust brakes. My current truck does a great job managing 25K+ GCW on 6-7% grades without having to use the brakes. The EB in my Duramax was considerably weaker, but still much better than any gas engine I've used.


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time2roll

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Posted: 04/21/21 11:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My truck needs to use brakes if descending 6% or better grades. Been down plenty of long 9%-10% grades without issue. Some engine braking helps and the brakes work fine. Some of these commenters need to have their brakes checked if they are having issues.


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noteven

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Posted: 04/21/21 11:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Put actuators on the solar panels that can stand them up facing forward on downgrades. More frontal are with light weight works wonders for downgrade braking.

valhalla360

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Posted: 04/21/21 02:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mkirsch wrote:

What is all this malarkey about "engine braking?"

I've owned several full size pickup trucks, all with small block V8's except my '03 Chevy 3500, and NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM could hold ITSELF back on any sort of incline using the engine alone. Downshift downshift downshift, rev rev rev, faster faster faster... I ALWAYS had to control the descent with brakes.

The ONLY truck I've ever owned that would control itself on a hill is the '03 Chevy 3500 with the 8.1L and Allison. Turn on tow haul mode, hold the brakes for 3 seconds, and the hill would have to be EXTREMELY steep to need brakes, and then only a brief tap. However, the truck still needs frequent application of brakes to maintain speed with any sort of trailer behind.

Unless you're throwing out a ship's anchor at the top of the hill, you're using brakes.


Obviously, it will depend on a few factors (total weight, engine size & grade).

I was shocked how good the V10 in our 2008 is as an engine brake (F250 towing around 7500lb trailer).

Sure if we are doing a 8-10% downgrade, I have to hit the brakes every so often but far less than if we just relied on the wheel brakes.

With a 4-5% grade, I generally don't have to touch the brake pedal at all.

Of course a smaller engine will provide less engine braking but it should still be your first line of defense as it can provide it's braking power pretty much constantly and indefinitely.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
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JRscooby

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Posted: 04/22/21 04:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mkirsch wrote:

What is all this malarkey about "engine braking?"

I've owned several full size pickup trucks, all with small block V8's except my '03 Chevy 3500, and NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM could hold ITSELF back on any sort of incline using the engine alone. Downshift downshift downshift, rev rev rev, faster faster faster... I ALWAYS had to control the descent with brakes.

The ONLY truck I've ever owned that would control itself on a hill is the '03 Chevy 3500 with the 8.1L and Allison. Turn on tow haul mode, hold the brakes for 3 seconds, and the hill would have to be EXTREMELY steep to need brakes, and then only a brief tap. However, the truck still needs frequent application of brakes to maintain speed with any sort of trailer behind.

Unless you're throwing out a ship's anchor at the top of the hill, you're using brakes.


Just for snots, on a stop you make every day, slip into neutral as you start to stop. Bet you need more brake than normal.

jshupe wrote:


That's my experience with gas engines, not diesels with exhaust brakes. My current truck does a great job managing 25K+ GCW on 6-7% grades without having to use the brakes. The EB in my Duramax was considerably weaker, but still much better than any gas engine I've used.


One thing many don't understand how much the high-speed rearends have reduced the effectiveness of engine braking.
I would still like to see a side by side comparison, same gears/loads/displacement, the whoa power of restricting air going in the engine compared to restricting the air coming out.
I will never forget the first load on the first diesel I bought. That 6-71 did not have any add-ons to help slow the load.

mkirsch

Rochester, NY

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Posted: 04/22/21 07:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

mkirsch wrote:

What is all this malarkey about "engine braking?"

I've owned several full size pickup trucks, all with small block V8's except my '03 Chevy 3500, and NOT A SINGLE ONE OF THEM could hold ITSELF back on any sort of incline using the engine alone. Downshift downshift downshift, rev rev rev, faster faster faster... I ALWAYS had to control the descent with brakes.

The ONLY truck I've ever owned that would control itself on a hill is the '03 Chevy 3500 with the 8.1L and Allison. Turn on tow haul mode, hold the brakes for 3 seconds, and the hill would have to be EXTREMELY steep to need brakes, and then only a brief tap. However, the truck still needs frequent application of brakes to maintain speed with any sort of trailer behind.

Unless you're throwing out a ship's anchor at the top of the hill, you're using brakes.


Just for snots, on a stop you make every day, slip into neutral as you start to stop. Bet you need more brake than normal.


Not really. At slow speeds the truck is basically coasting.

This "engine braking" isn't as effective as people claim it is. You're not going to downshift and cruise on down the hill with your feet flat on the floor towing a trailer. Most vehicles won't even do that empty.

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

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Posted: 04/22/21 07:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Scooby
Something to think about on gears. The 6, 8 and 10 so transmissions have a 4, 4.3 and 4.5-1 1st gear ratios. With a 3.42 in pumpkins they are lower geared than the majority of older 3 and 4 sp auto rigs with 1st being in the 2.48 to 3.1 range. I have better engine braking in my 2014 1500 with a V6, than ANY of my SB/BB setups in 25/35 setups in past years. Better starting abilities too.
Along with an overall taller ratio for better mpg's.
As the article mentions, the newer transmissions are what generally makes the newer trucks better overall from a driving experience.
Hence my feelings the OPs truck will do fine!
Marty

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