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RambleOnNW

Pacific Northwest

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Posted: 05/05/21 02:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:



Read HERE

"The trouble is how to make it in the first place. Most hydrogen today is generated by heating coal and natural gas with steam, but that process emits a lot of carbon dioxide, nullifying hydrogen’s eco-credentials."

...



A green hydrogen plant will be built in your state of Pennsylvania. Check it out:

https://www.wesa.fm/environment-energy/2........lvania-to-get-first-green-hydrogen-plant


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Reisender

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Posted: 05/05/21 02:25pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc.


Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.

time2roll

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Posted: 05/05/21 02:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

One industry source told Oilprice that the production of one ton of hydrogen through electrolysis required an average of nine tons of water. But to get these nine tons of water, it would not be enough to just divert a nearby river. The water that the electrolyzer breaks down into constituent elements needs to be purified
This is basic chemistry with 9 tons of water made up of 1 ton of hydrogen and 8 tons of oxygen. No water is getting wasted or polluted. The pure water comes back when the hydrogen is "burned".

The real question might be what to do with the 8 tons of oxygen....


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RambleOnNW

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Posted: 05/05/21 02:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc.


Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.


May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries.

dedmiston

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Posted: 05/05/21 02:58pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

From the start, this didn't feel like an RV thread to me. And while the discussion has been interesting, I'm moving this from General RVing to Around The Campfire.


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Reisender

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:05pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc.


Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.


May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries.


Fair enough. But not everybody is as constrained for time. The extra 20 -30 minutes in an EV for that trip might be worth it to some as an EV has a lot of advantages. I think in your case a bigger challenge would be is if the infrastructure is in place on the route you need to go. We are very fortunate in that infrastructure is pretty good on the routes we travel, but at least for the near future that may not be the case for some or even many people depending on where they are and where they are going. That will take time.

Jmho.

time2roll

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:12pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RambleOnNW wrote:

May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries.
I think we may see a 500 mile battery before we see 500 mile hydrogen vehicle.
Also battery charging makes heat so the snow and cold should not disrupt charging. Hydrogen makes cold and currently tends to freeze up the connectors when used back to back to back. The defrost time could take even longer when it is below freezing. One more thing to work out.

RambleOnNW

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

Reisender wrote:

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc.


Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry.


Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.


May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries.


Fair enough. But not everybody is as constrained for time. The extra 20 -30 minutes in an EV for that trip might be worth it to some as an EV has a lot of advantages. I think in your case a bigger challenge would be is if the infrastructure is in place on the route you need to go. We are very fortunate in that infrastructure is pretty good on the routes we travel, but at least for the near future that may not be the case for some or even many people depending on where they are and where they are going. That will take time.

Jmho.


You must take into account that electric cars lose significant range in cold temperatures particularly the temperatures I am talking. Running the electric heat pump takes energy also. Hydrogen fuel cells generate heat as a part of the hydrogen and oxygen combining. Also right now there is hydrogen at the Amazon and Walmart warehouses fueling hydrogen forklifts every 3 seconds across the country. Hydrogen forklifts moved 1/3 of US groceries in the US in the last year and don’t have any performance degradation in cold warehouses.

RambleOnNW

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

RambleOnNW wrote:

May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries.
I think we may see a 500 mile battery before we see 500 mile hydrogen vehicle.
Also battery charging makes heat so the snow and cold should not disrupt charging. Hydrogen makes cold and currently tends to freeze up the connectors when used back to back to back. The defrost time could take even longer when it is below freezing. One more thing to work out.


Hydrogen fuel cells generate heat not cold.

We’ll likely see a 1000 mile hydrogen truck before a 500 mile battery electric truck:
https://tfloffroad.com/2021/02/glickenha........ered-pickup-truck-in-the-2023-baja-1000/

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Posted: 05/05/21 03:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Folks, let's stop with the quotes within quotes within quotes within quotes within quotes please. Just quote the member to which you are responding to, and if it is the post directly above you, you do not need to quote at all. Thanks.

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