Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Best stabilization upgrade(s)?
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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  Modifications and Accessories

 > Best stabilization upgrade(s)?

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GrandpaKip

Flat Rock

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Posted: 05/05/21 08:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I still think that it’s a bad idea, unless you have a really stout frame. The vast majority of trailers do not.
The BAL brochure basically says to use their scissor jack as a stabilizer, and not as a jack to prevent frame damage.
So, how much weight can be taken off the suspension? I don’t know and I’m not going to try and find out.
In my opinion, it’s a much better idea to add a stabilizer in the middle.


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LarryJM

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Posted: 05/05/21 05:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The factory installed stabilizer jacks are simply in the wrong locations. I had four of the aluminum stack jacks that I kept from my last trailer and with some experimenting I found that if I put them about 6' in front and in back of the axles I didn't even need the factory ones which I removed and don't even have them on my trailer anymore. Now if you have a long trailer say 30' and have a major living area at the rear you might need something at that end, but all I have is a bedroom that is only used to sleep in so there is almost no walking around in the last 8' or so of my trailer.

I had used these jacks on my previous 26' TT for over 25 years for a rock solid setup so I just felt their use had to help the poor stabilization with what came on our new trailer. As far as the forward/back movement I've never had that since I make sure my little cheapo wheel chocks and well planted against both sides of the wheels on both sides of the trailer (4 chocks total).

IMHO the secret to stabilizing a trailer is the proper support locations and getting a good pressure on the jacks ... not lifting the trailer, but doing a similar procedure that even things like the Strong Arm site recommends with their product. I found the only way to do this was to use the tongue jack.

Larry


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BackOfThePack

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Posted: 05/13/21 06:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LarryJM wrote:

The factory installed stabilizer jacks are simply in the wrong locations. I had four of the aluminum stack jacks that I kept from my last trailer and with some experimenting I found that if I put them about 6' in front and in back of the axles I didn't even need the factory ones which I removed and don't even have them on my trailer anymore. Now if you have a long trailer say 30' and have a major living area at the rear you might need something at that end, but all I have is a bedroom that is only used to sleep in so there is almost no walking around in the last 8' or so of my trailer.

I had used these jacks on my previous 26' TT for over 25 years for a rock solid setup so I just felt their use had to help the poor stabilization with what came on our new trailer. As far as the forward/back movement I've never had that since I make sure my little cheapo wheel chocks and well planted against both sides of the wheels on both sides of the trailer (4 chocks total).

IMHO the secret to stabilizing a trailer is the proper support locations and getting a good pressure on the jacks ... not lifting the trailer, but doing a similar procedure that even things like the Strong Arm site recommends with their product. I found the only way to do this was to use the tongue jack.

Larry
m

A long premium TT like mine came with (4) double stabilizers. Each end, and near the tandems. (8) points of contact. That, plus a set of inter-tire set wheel chocks. Tires and springs (body) have to be treated separately.

Shock absorber kit if you don’t have it, plus axle crossmembers (MOR/ryde) to keep leaf bushings unstressed. This trailer came with all of this.

The JT Strong-arm (Lippert) might be worthwhile. The aluminum A-frame jacks are great for long-term parking.


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Huntindog

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Posted: 05/18/21 08:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The JT strong arms work..... BUT, if you have the electric jacks where both legs come down with one switch and adjust to uneven ground automatically.... One should think it over.
That style of jack has a huge advantage in that it keeps even pressure on both legs. Even when settling into the ground. This makes it impossible to rack the frame causing the doors to stick etc.
Using JT strongarms with these jacks interferes with the equal pressure feature. So using them together on a surface which will allow settling could be a bad thing. Using them on a solid surface slab would work fine.



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allen8106

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Posted: 05/20/21 10:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TFin04 wrote:

We have a 31ft TT and when fully set up, still get some trailer rocking when someone is walking through the trailer.

I know we won't ever make it 100% solid, but I'm wondering what you found the best stabilization upgrades to be.

We have manual stabilization jacks and I know they sell larger versions.

I've also seen that a simple "X Chock" between the two tires can make a big difference.

I'm just wondering if you guys have used one or both of these, and which you think is the best value for performance.

Thanks!


JT Strongarms are the best stabilization upgrade I've done. because of this I no longer use a kingpin tripod.


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Kavoom

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Posted: 05/23/21 05:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One that kind of surprised me was when people installed suspension upgrades and in particular Sumo Springs. People put them on for one reason but often mention they improve the kinds of things you are noting.

Cocky_Camper

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Posted: 05/26/21 01:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some block or wood for under the jacks. The less you have to lower the jacks to the ground, the less movement you will feel. Also, make sure your tires are chocked good! Back on the back chock and hammer the front one under the tire. Several hours after the tires have cooled off, hit them again with the hammer to snug them up.


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Campinfan

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Posted: 05/28/21 12:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I cannot remember the brand but I had a cheaper version of the JT Strongarms on2 of my trailers. I actually would put 2 on each stabilizer (90 degrees to each other) and they worked great. They were BAL 23216. I just looked them up.


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Campinfan

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Posted: 05/28/21 12:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

duplicate

LVJJJ

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Posted: 05/29/21 08:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use the sledge hammer method. Take two tire chalks (I know its chocks), drive them under the tires with a small sledge, problem solved. I tried those X things between the tires, but I kept forgetting about them when hooking up and heading out so ruined a couple. You can have them. A little trailer shake is part of the pleasures of trailer camping.


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