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wa8yxm

Wherever I happen to park

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Posted: 05/08/21 04:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Most Generator stores and larger RV stores have the needed adapter

Any electrician or electrical shop can make one.

You can as well if you know what the Bleep you are doing

NOTE.. You may need to do somethign "illegal" if you have a hard wired surge guard in your RV.. and you should have one (One of the top end ones that monitor voltage and turn you off if it's not right)(

That something is connect green and white together to teh white screw on the generator end of the adapter . Green is often Not Connected in the Generator,


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NRALIFR

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Posted: 05/08/21 05:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You anti-generator bigots need to slow down and read what the OP posted......TWICE.

The OP said he is wanting this generator “for emergency home use and maybe boondocking”. In his second post (which I’m not going to quote because it’s already been quoted and ignored once), he’s described usage that is totally home emergency use. So I would say that his intended usage is PRIMARILY home use.

Neither situation will bother you or any other campers. The OP is from Texas, and I’m inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt that “boondocking” means nobody else will be around that will give a shyte.

As for home emergency use, he said he will be running it on NG, which is a good plan for obvious reasons. Using NG as the fuel source will de-rate the generator output to about 7KW though, so that should be kept in mind. I don’t consider it to be over-kill for a unit that is primarily for home standby use.

It has 240 volt circuits, so it could be used for a small central air system, but you’ll have very little capacity left of you do. Since the OP has NG available at home though, if he has gas furnaces, the generator can be used to run those. I’m sure he’s very well aware of this now after the power problems Texas just experienced, staying warm can be critical in a winter power outage. If he experienced a long outage in the summertime, it has enough excess capacity that it could be used to run a portable or window mounted AC.

It’s also large enough to run all of the critical loads in a typical house, and allow you to live more or less normally during an extended outage. You need to consider powering things like refrigerators, freezers, pumps, fans, garage door openers, hair dryers, microwaves, washers and dryers, and probably a few things I’m forgetting during an extended power outage.

Raife, just for comparison sake, I have a 10KW home standby generator installed at my house. It uses NG for the fuel, so its de-rated to 9KW. It has the ability to provide 240 volts, but I’m not using it for any 240 circuits because that reduces the number of 120 volt circuits the transfer switch panel can support. It’s powered us through several extended outages over the years, most of them in the wintertime. We’ve had a couple of long summertime outages though, and I’ve had to use a portable AC to give us a cool place to sleep, and cool the room the boss uses as a home office. It’s run for as long as a week continuously, and will add about $100 to our gas bill after running that long. I remember one of those summertime outages that the daytime temperature was getting over 100* every day, which also de-rates its output, and the generator was running very close to overload for several hours each day.

Now having said all that, for strictly RV use I prefer the quieter inverter based units, even if nobody else is around to hear it. My TC has a 3600 LP generator built in that is an inverter type, but it’s used so seldom that at 20 years old it has less than 150 hours on it. I also carry a Yamaha 1000 that’s much quieter than the built-in, and I use the snot out of it. It has no hour meter on it, but I use it all the time both at home and camping.

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Bobbo

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Posted: 05/08/21 06:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wa8yxm wrote:

NOTE.. You may need to do somethign "illegal".....That something is connect green and white together to teh white screw on the generator end of the adapter . Green is often Not Connected in the Generator,

It's not "illegal" on a generator. It is only "illegal" in a subpanel connected to the grid.


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wanderingaimlessly

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Posted: 05/08/21 08:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have used a construction type genny for years as a home backup and a couple times to power my camper. If the op is somewhere that his home has a well instead of city water, he likely has to have a 240 connection to power the well. I made a cord and cutoff for that purpose with the old Honda, and then used a 15 amp extension cord to power the fridge and a couple lights along with it.
If that is not the case and he wants a larger genny for dual use the 4500 watt from Westinghouse may be a great compromise although IF the natural gas connection was a major attraction, this may not meet your wishes.

valhalla360

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Posted: 05/08/21 09:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

For what you plan to run 8000 watts is overkill.


We got caught in that same storm in Texas one of the big problems was down south, a lot of the houses didn't have furnaces, so there was a run on electric space heaters (of course ours crapped out the day before temps dropped but at least we still had the furnace in the RV, so only a minor hassle of keeping up on propane).

8k watts isn't overkill to run 3-4 1500w space heaters in the house.

That said, it's a pretty poor choice to take camping.


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Raife

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Posted: 05/08/21 10:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you for the last couple of posts/responses...very helpful. I will amend my earlier statement regarding boondocking and requalify the trailer use as "to live in during an extended power outage while the trailer is parked in our driveway."

It is true that my primary at this point is for home emergency use.

I was actually looking at the Westinghouse first, but they were NOWHERE in stock...I am on alerts from several retailers and even Westinghouse themselves. However, I see that Amazon has them in stock now.

The natural gas is still very appealing as I can use it for an extended time without needing to refuel and it is a minimal cost (thank you NRALIFR for your perspective).

If we ever decide to actually boondock (which is likely rare) I will look into getting a quiet generator.

Thank you for everyone's perspectives.

pianotuna

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Posted: 05/08/21 11:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360,

A house without a furnace never occurred to me--so thanks for pointing that out.

If you wished to run electric heaters, where I live 8000 watts would not be enough--and would barely do my RV where my peak load is 7300 watts, and continuous load is 5400.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

NRALIFR

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Posted: 05/08/21 11:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That’s why I mentioned that the generator could be used to run a gas furnace. Furnace fan motors are typically 120 volts, and will require much less wattage than electric heaters, so if at all possible you should make it possible to use your gas furnace in a power outage. Letting your house freeze up is not a good idea at all.

That kind of cold doesn’t happen often in TX, but as we just saw, when it does happen, it’s bad. I’m “next door” in AR, and it got cold enough here that I was having to pay very close attention to how cold the vulnerable water pipes in my house were getting. Some of my neighbors didn’t pay attention and had frozen/broken water lines.

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Raife

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Posted: 05/08/21 11:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a heat pump system, so I will have to look into if we are able to run it. I plan on buying a couple electric heaters now while demand is low. When we lived in CO, we had a 2 zone system, 2 dedicated furnaces and 2 dedicated AC units...it was awesome.

Grit dog

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Posted: 05/09/21 04:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Raife, man I was down in the Texas mess at our boys hockey tournament!
It was a 5 alarm madhouse down there.
Finally ended up ditching the hotel with no power for 2 + days and hijacking our rental car to Albuquerque to get a flight home.
Buy that genny and a pallet of space heaters and then you can guarantee that weather will never happen again!
Actually told my buddy in Albuquerque he should pull out every penny he had in the bank and fill his race trailer with generators, space heaters and gas cans and hump it down there. He would have made a fortune!
That said, you don’t need near that big of generator to wait out a little power outage. With the odds against what happened this year happening again. If your camper doesn’t have a genny I’d think about getting a smaller dual purpose unit.

We have a 7k generator for power outages. Pretty common occurrence here in the coastal PNW. I plug it in and we just keep going like the power was on.
But for even more occasional use and versatility, I’d be thinking smaller honestly. JMO.

* This post was edited 05/10/21 09:07pm by an administrator/moderator *


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