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 > Understanding towing weights?

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thomas201

Eastern Panhandle WV

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Posted: 06/18/21 08:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You will only know for sure by scaling your rig, but read the manufactures' information very carefully. Ford, in their info, includes a 150# passenger at each seat belt location when figuring payload. There will be other things included/deleted that will adjust the printed numbers.

All that being said, buy a 350/3500 unless you need a 250/2500, usually registration, HOA rules, hammer lanes and parkways. There are reasons for 250/2500 I just gave you my four. Next, buy a dually if you want the best towing experience. However, they stink for driving in the mud, they cannot climb out of ruts and those wide hips cannot go down a narrow two track. You also must pry out rocks from the duals, unless you want holes in the fenders and the risk of killing someone. They are not the best on snow, but boy do they tow sweet.

Me? F250 diesel for the 4 reasons above, plus a little mud work. I have a small 5er. Loaded for a long trip, us in the cab: Truck Front: 4800, Rear: 4850, Trailer: 8050;;; Calculated Truck: 9650, Trailer: 9650, Pin: 1600, Combined: 17,700. So, those numbers are honest, but a little strange with the tuck and trailer weighing the same. She is light on the pin at 16.6%, but it tows easy, no wagging tail.

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 06/18/21 08:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some on RV websites typically say get a one ton DRW/SRW as a 3/4 ton can't tow a 5th wheel trailer...or nothing but a TT...or other opinions based on.....thats 'nother topic.

As Biscuit says the bottom line for any LDT payload will be its RAWR numbers. RAWR number can be the lessor of the tires...wheels...rear spring pack.

Having towed GNs for a living I learned 40 years ago never make a statement that a truck/trailer combo is overloaded without first looking at its scales axle loads.

Anywayz the new GM 2500 trucks have up to 11550 gvwr and 6600 rawr. A 3553 lb payload sticker when all placed in the bed will put the 2500 GM close to max axle/tire/rear spring pack ratings. A 5th wheel trailer (pin weight zero over the trucks rear axle) on a short bed truck adds little to no weight on the trucks front axle.

The new 2500 GM you mention will have no problems pulling a 13k 5th wheel trailer or carrying its pin weight all safely/legally.

The 3500 srw gm with its 7050 rawr vs 6600 rawr may have another 400-450 lb payload advantage.

The 3500 drw has those huge 10500 rawr number is a huge over kill for a 12k/13k 5th wheel trailer. BTDT and I'm not a fan of RV website silly sayings that "you can't have too much truck". BTDT and know the difference doesn't make cents/sense.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

'03 2500 QC Dodge/Cummins HO 3.73 6 speed manual Jacobs Westach
'97 Park Avanue 28' 5er 11200 two slides

wing_zealot

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Posted: 06/18/21 12:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

thomas201 wrote:

You will only know for sure by scaling your rig, but read the manufactures' information very carefully. Ford, in their info, includes a 150# passenger at each seat belt location when figuring payload. There will be other things included/deleted that will adjust the printed numbers...
That is simply not true. The weight as shown on the door sticker (payload rating) is there by federal law; and it is the GVWR minus the curb weight as it left the factory door.

thomas201

Eastern Panhandle WV

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Posted: 06/18/21 01:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

From the 2022 Ford Towing Guide: "Cargo Weight Rating shown in chart is maximum allowable, assuming weight of a base vehicle with required camper option content and a 150-lb. passenger at each available seating position."

Don't forget, our friend, the OP, does not yet have his truck, thus he cannot see a yellow sticker for his machine. He is trying to pick a model and spec it out. The towing guide is his best bet at this stage in the game.

However the towing guide also says that the towing numbers use: "Maximum towing capabilities are for properly equipped vehicles with required equipment and a 150-lb. driver and passenger and vary based on cargo, vehicle configuration, accessories, option content and number of passengers. See label on door jamb for carrying capacity of a specific vehicle. For additional information, see your Ford Dealer."

So, for towing use 2 passengers, but for cargo carrying (pin weight) they assume 3 to 6 depending on the truck. Is it any wonder that people are confused? The yellow sticker is great, but it becomes worthless when you meet the real world of tools, me(I beat that 150#), wife, dog and all my junk in the cab. You have to scale a truck and then compare it to all the max numbers on the yellow sticker, wheels, tires, axles, and registration, plus any components I forgot.

This is why so many say get a 1 ton, or a dually. They want to avoid a 10 to 20 thousand dollar mistake, if you think the manufactures numbers mean anything. Others say a 3/4 ton can tow anything, just ignore Chevy/Ford/Ram. Me, I can drive nails with a pipe wrench, but I would rather use a hammer. Buy the truck to suit your needs, but consider all of your needs.

Lwiddis

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Posted: 06/18/21 01:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Now, I am starting to think there's a lot of rigs overloaded out there on the roads."

A lot of rigs? At least 50% are overloaded IMO.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watt solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL flag pole. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist14 yr. Army vet-11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


wing_zealot

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Posted: 06/18/21 01:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

thomas201 wrote:

From the 2022 Ford Towing Guide: "Cargo Weight Rating shown in chart is maximum allowable, assuming weight of a base vehicle with required camper option content and a 150-lb. passenger at each available seating position...

That would be the page that talks about slide in campers; not at all what we are talking about here.

towing guide Page 11, second paragraph

There are no "Payload" numbers in the towing guide.

* This post was edited 06/18/21 02:11pm by wing_zealot *

thomas201

Eastern Panhandle WV

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Posted: 06/18/21 02:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok, Wing I give up. Tell me how to estimate the amount of weight a pickup can carry, before you buy it and can see the yellow sticker? That is what the OP needs to know.

Probably the most important number when buying a PU to tow a 5er is the payload, carrying capacity, pin weight. Give the OP advice on how to pick that very important number. Can he use a 3/4, SRW 1 ton, or a dually?

I spec an F250 out for carrying a truck camper, because it gives me the overload springs of an F350. It does nothing for the yellow sticker, but it sags less and drives better. Anything better, I will use your idea and give you credit.

wing_zealot

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Posted: 06/18/21 03:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So you trying to tell me I should use numbers from the towing brochure that having nothing to do with towing a fifth wheel? Thanks but that won’t work for me; especially seeing as I can go to the dealer and open doors on a few hundred trucks to get real numbers.

garyp4951

TN

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Posted: 06/19/21 07:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

These charts help sometimes

[image]
[image]Click For Full-Size Image.

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 06/19/21 07:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

have you scalled your truck yet? the 3553 payload is an aproximation and realy only a number for estimation, what is thw most accurate is to get it scalled with a full talk of gas to get your seperat axel weights. then you know how much weight you can add to the axel. so you think you might have 3553 of payload available but depening on your options on the truck and such you might only have 3000 or maybe 3800. only axtualy scaling th truck will tell you exactly. if you normaly have your wife and dog with you when you travel you could even have all of them with the full tank of gas and that gives you the weight you can add related to the trailer and hitch.

Steve


2014 F350 6.7 Platinum
2016 Cougar 330RBK

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